Matt Cain struck out 14 batters on his way to the first perfect game in Giants franchise history. Photo: Jason O. Watson/Getty Images

Matt Cain has thrown the 22nd perfect game in major league history, and the first by a Giants’ pitcher. The Giants won the game against the Houston Astros 10-0. The Chronicle and Mercury News have stories up now.

You can watch Gregor Blanco’s seventh-inning, perfection-saving catch in right-center here. Plus more video highlights and Cain’s post-game interview.

Below is a live blog of the last few innings…

9:20 p.m. : Blanco just made a Willie Mays-like catch in center to preserve the in-progress perfect game. Click on the video link at this site to see it. SB Nation also has video of the catch here.

9:34 p.m. Nice play by Arias on a slow roller to third. He’s out!

9:37 p.m. Called strike three! Two outs now in the eighth. That’s a big 14 strikeouts for Cain.

9:39 p.m. Crawford ranges to his left at short, not an easy play…but he’s out! 24 straight for Cain, and we get a breather before the dramatic 9th.

9:42 p.m. Duane Kuiper is talking about the pressure on the defense in a situation like this. Kuiper played second during Len Barker’s perfect game for the Indians in 1981.

9:45 p.m. How many perfect games have their been? Twenty-one since 1880, including one this year by the White Sox’ Philip Humber. No Giant has ever thrown one.

9:48 p.m. Here we go. Bogusevic, Snyder, and maybe a pinch hitter for the pitcher are due up.

9:50 p.m. Fly out to left! That’s one.

9:51 p.m. Fly out to left again! That’s two! The hitter is now Jason Castro, a Bay Area kid.

9:52 p.m. It’s over! He did it! Another tough play at third ends it!

9:56 p.m. This play right here is the one people will be talking about in terms of defense.

  • TomSeaver

    Way to jinx it, dude. 

  • TomSeaver

    I hate that Jimmy Qualls. 

Author

Jon Brooks

Jon Brooks writes mostly on film for KQED Arts. He is also an online editor and writer for KQED's daily news blog, News Fix. Jon is a playwright whose work has been produced in San Francisco, New York, Italy, and around the U.S.

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