Good Read: The Risks And Rewards Of Growing Up Gaming

“What are video games doing? If you have an age-appropriate game that’s not too easy or too hard, a video game is teaching a child how to cope with failure, deal with frustration, delay gratification, and often doing it in a social context, where they’re learning to negotiate with their friends, working as a team, … Continue reading Good Read: The Risks And Rewards Of Growing Up Gaming →

Is Gaming the New Essential Literacy?

TB By Aran Levassur “When people learn to play video games,” said James Paul Gee, “they are learning a new literacy.” This is one of the reason kids love playing them: They are learning a new interactive language that grants them access to virtual worlds that are filled with intrigue, engagement and meaningful challenges. And … Continue reading Is Gaming the New Essential Literacy? →

“Gaming” the College Admissions Process

Dave Herholz For many high school students, the fall semester means it’s time to get serious about the college admissions process. While some graduating seniors have a good idea of which school they’d like to attend, many don’t. And even if the student has a stellar academic record and hopes to score an acceptance letter … Continue reading “Gaming” the College Admissions Process →

Here Comes the Gaming Revolution: Notes from GLS7

Big thinkers and innovators in education have gathered at the Games & Learning Society Conference in Madison, Wisconsin this week. I wish I could’ve gone to this conference, but here’s just a taste of what’s happening on day one. We’ll continue updating throughout the day.

Gaming and Learning: Canterbury Tales Meets World of Warcraft

It’s always gratifying to hear from students commenting on MindShift articles. The Huffington Post’s publishing of “Ten Surprising Truths About Video Games,” received a slew of responses. My two favorites: One who pointed to a video putting James Gee’s theories of gaming and learning to action by creating a movie made from World of Warcraft … Continue reading Gaming and Learning: Canterbury Tales Meets World of Warcraft →