“Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day” was on February 25, 2016 and to celebrate we’ve curated a list of some inspiring women in engineering—right here in the Bay Area.

Alishia Ballard, civil engineer
Alishia Ballard is a civil engineer with San Francisco Public Works. One of the things she likes most about being an engineer is being able to help people by working on projects that benefit the community.

Maria Bualat, robotics engineer
In seventh grade, after reading a newspaper article about female engineers at NASA, Maria Bualat knew that was what she wanted to be when she grew up. Fast forward to today. Bualat is now a robotics engineer NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California where she develops robotics systems for space exploration.

Monica Barin, industrial engineer
Monica Barin works for a start-up company that helps people buy solar panels for their homes. Industrial engineers help optimize complex processes or systems. Barin manages, organizes and optimizes all the complex financial information required to connect solar panel sellers with solar panel buyers.

Jessica Mong, software engineer
Jessica Mong works for SurveyMonkey, a company that creates and designs custom online surveys. Mong works on the billing side, writing code to ensure that customers can access and pay for surveys.

Amy Pickering, environmental health engineer
Amy Pickering gets to travel the world working to reduce the spread of disease. She develops low-cost and low-tech solutions that can help minimize illnesses in areas with poor water quality.

Vi Rapp, mechanical engineer
Vi Rapp is a mechanical engineer and research scientist working on improving combustion systems. One aspect of her work is designing cleaner, more efficient cookstoves, particularly for people in developing countries that traditionally cook over fire. Indoor air pollution from those fires is harmful to human health and the environment.

Author

Lauren Farrar

Lauren has a background in biology, education, and filmmaking. She has had the privilege to work on a diverse array of educational endeavors and is currently a producer for KQED Learning's YouTube series Above the Noise. Lauren's career has taken her to the deepest parts of the ocean to film deep sea hydrothermal vents for classroom webcasts, into the pool to film synchronized swimmers to teach about the pH scale, and on roller coasters to create a video about activation energy. And, she’s done it all for the sake of education. Lauren loves communicating science! Follow her on twitter @LFarrarAtWork

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