Elderly ladies pick over red envelopes at the Chinese New Year Flower Market Fair. The market is held before Chinese New Year proper in order for people to buy flowers, fruit, candy and plants before the new lunar year.

Elderly ladies pick over red envelopes at the Chinese New Year Flower Market Fair. The market is held before Chinese New Year proper in order for people to buy flowers, fruit, candy and plants before the new lunar year. (Alyssa Jeong Perry/KQED)

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor

Red and gold decorations covered stall-lined streets as preparations for the Year of the Dog began this weekend.

Chinese New Year isn’t until Feb. 16, but the festivities in San Francisco’s Chinatown have already started. Saturday kicked off the start of the Flower Market Fair with a procession and performances.

The market gives people a chance to buy flowers, fruit and more to decorate their homes ahead of Chinese New Year. Performances by acrobats, folk dancers and musicians will take place throughout the month, with a parade taking place Feb. 24.

Local restaurants are also serving up special menus this month. There are a number of other Chinese New Year events planned around the Bay Area.

Hundreds of people flocked to the Flower Market Fair's last day to pick up supplies for Chinese New Year celebrations. Festivities began in San Francisco's Chinatown this weekend and will run until March 4, 2018.
Hundreds of people flocked to the Flower Market Fair’s last day to pick up supplies for Chinese New Year celebrations. Festivities began in San Francisco’s Chinatown this weekend and will run until March 4, 2018. (Alyssa Jeong Perry/KQED)
Merchandise featured motifs for the Lunar New Year of the Dog. Stalls selling decorations, plants and more lined a red and gold bedecked street in Chinatown.
Merchandise featured motifs for the Lunar New Year of the Dog. Stalls selling decorations, plants and more lined a red and gold bedecked street in Chinatown. (Alyssa Jeong Perry/KQED)
Mascots for the festival walked today's fair. The costumes can be seen in action again at the Chinese New Year's Parade on February 24th.
Mascots for the festival walked around the fair. The costumes can be seen in action again at the Chinese New Year’s Parade on Feb. 24. (Alyssa Jeong Perry/KQED)
The main attraction at today's fair were the flowers. Plants symbolize growth and are an important part of decorating homes during Chinese New Year.
The main attraction at today’s fair were the flowers. Plants symbolize growth and are an important part of decorating homes during Chinese New Year. (Alyssa Jeong Perry/KQED)
PHOTOS: S.F. Chinatown Prepares for the Year of the Dog 11 February,2018Bianca Hernandez

Author

Bianca Hernandez

Bianca Hernandez is an Interactive Producer at KQED. She has produced at KGPE, KSEE24 and Sierra Magazine. In 2011 she received an undergraduate degree in Journalism and Anthropology fromĀ CSU, Chico . She earned a Master’s from the University of Southern California in 2013, where she completed a documentary on teenage farmworkers. She is an avid Jane Austen fan and takes lightsaber combat class for fun. You can reach her at bhernandez@kqed.org or @bookhoarding on Twitter.