Silicon Valley ZIP Codes Top List of 2016’s Highest U.S. Home Prices

The 16,468 square feet house would come with a monthly mortgage more than most families make in a year.

This 16,468-square-foot Atherton mansion would come with a monthly mortgage more than most families make in a year. (Alain Pinel Realtors)

Here’s a migraine for would-be Bay Area homebuyers and a source of probably undeserved self-congratulations for those who bought a place here in, say, the 1990s, and have stuck around to build up some equity: An updated tally of U.S. home prices finds that 38 of the 100 most expensive ZIP codes in the nation are in our nine-county region.

Real estate research firm PropertyShark.com says ZIP code 94027, in the Silicon Valley suburb of Atherton, is the most expensive in the Bay Area, based on 2016 sales prices, and No. 2 in the entire country with a median property price of $5.425 million.

The top area on the national list, 11962, is Sagaponack, New York, in Long Island’s wealthy Hamptons, with a 2016 median sales price of $5.5 million. (A math reminder: median is the midpoint in a range of values — here, we’re talking home prices — with half the values below that point and half above.)

The PropertyShark list shows that eight of the 10 top Bay Area ZIP codes are in or adjacent to Silicon Valley, including two areas in Palo Alto and two in Los Altos. Twelve ZIP codes in the region have recorded median sales prices of $2 million or more this year.

In terms of national and state bragging rights — if having so much housing stock rise beyond the reach of all but the most wealthy or daring is anything to brag about — the San Francisco Bay region appears to have the most ZIP codes (38, remember) in the national Top 100. Los Angeles and Orange counties, which as ignorant norteños we’re treating as a single metro area, have 28 ZIP codes in that top tier.

The report also finds that 70 of the top 100 ZIP codes nationwide are in California and 20 are in New York state. The remaining 10 include two each in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Jersey and one each in Florida, Maryland, Nevada and Washington state.


Here’s the list of Bay Area ZIP codes. You can find PropertyShark’s full list here.

Bay Area RankNational RankZIP CodeCityMedian Sale Price

1 2 94027 Atherton $5,425,000
2 8 94301 Palo Alto $2,935,000
3 9 94022 Los Altos $2,831,250
4 10 94028 Portola Valley $2,815,000
5 13 94957 Ross $2,771,250
6 15 94024 Los Altos $2,637,500
7 22 94010 Burlingame $2,234,000
8 23 94306 Palo Alto $2,227,500
9 24 94123 San Francisco $2,210,000
10 25 95030 Los Gatos $2,180,000
11 28 95070 Saratoga $2,160,000
12 31 94920 Tiburon $2,100,000
13 33 94970 Stinson Beach $1,950,000
14 37 94118 San Francisco $1,860,000
15 38 94025 Menlo Park $1,850,000
16 39 94305 Stanford $1,818,000
17 42 94528 Diablo $1,785,000
18 55 95014 Cupertino $1,600,000
19 57 94507 Alamo $1,565,000
20 58 94087 Sunnyvale $1,565,000
21 59 94062 Redwood City $1,560,000
22 62 94041 Mountain View $1,535,000
23 63 94114 San Francisco $1,525,000
24 69 94705 Berkeley $1,505,000
25 70 94402 San Mateo $1,502,000
26 71 94939 Larkspur $1,500,000
27 73 94040 Mountain View $1,500,000
28 75 94070 San Carlos $1,491,000
29 82 94108 San Francisco $1,437,500
30 84 94002 Belmont $1,425,000
31 85 94127 San Francisco $1,420,000
32 87 94946 Nicasio $1,410,000
33 90 95032 Los Gatos $1,400,000
34 91 94117 San Francisco $1,400,000
35 92 94131 San Francisco $1,397,500
36 96 94904 Greenbrae $1,365,000
37 99 95129 San Jose $1,350,000
38 100 94563 Orinda $1,350,000

Source: PropertyShark.com

  • Hillary Clintub

    Let’s hope the government plops a large public housing project right in the middle of each of those zip codes. Boy, wouldn’t that make those uber rich liberals scream. Those projects should be at least twenty stories high, too, so the residents could watch all those swimming pools for cheap entertainment.

Author

Dan Brekke

Dan Brekke is a blogger, reporter and editor for KQED News, responsible for online breaking news coverage of topics ranging from California water issues to the Bay Area's transportation challenges. In a newsroom career that began in Chicago in 1972, Dan has worked as a city and foreign/national editor for The San Francisco Examiner, editor at Wired News, deputy editor at Wired magazine, managing editor at TechTV as well as for several Web startups.

Since joining KQED in 2007, Dan has reported, edited and produced both radio and online features and breaking news pieces. He has shared in two Society of Professional Journalists Norcal Excellence in Journalism awards — for his 2012 reporting on a KQED Science series on water and power in California, and in 2014, for KQED's comprehensive reporting on the south Napa earthquake.

In addition to his 44 years of on-the-job education, Dan is a lifelong student of history and is still pursuing an undergraduate degree.

Email Dan at: dbrekke@kqed.org

Twitter: twitter.com/danbrekke
Facebook: www.facebook.com/danbrekke
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/danbrekke

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor