Some social networks, including Nextdoor, have changed their policies after a number of racial profiling incidents between real-life neighbors. One controversy broke out at a neighborhood in Oakland, California, focused on Nextdoor’s “neighborhood watch” function. Some residents got upset when they realized the “suspicious” people white members posted about tended to be people of color. Hear from two Oakland neighbors who dealt with the problem head-on and found more neighborly ways to behave online.

Online Racial Profiling Divides Neighbors of Color 2 November,2016Joshua Johnson

Author

Joshua Johnson

Joshua Johnson is the creator and host of Truth Be Told, a special series on race from KQED and PRI. Prior to creating the show, he served as the station’s morning news anchor for five-and-half years.

Prior to joining KQED, Joshua spent six years as an anchor/reporter for WLRN Miami Herald News. He’s a native of South Florida, with degrees from the University of Miami. His reporting and newscasting have won awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association and from the National Association of Black Journalists. Joshua is also active in his union, SAG-AFTRA. He lives in San Francisco.

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