Preliminary Marin Election Results

With 100% of precincts reporting and some mail-in ballots counted:

Measure A (55% needed)

Yes – 66.30%
No – 33.70%

Measure B (55% needed)

Yes – 67.08%
No – 32.92%

Measure C

Yes – 72.90%
No – 27.10%

Measure D

Yes – 59.40%
No – 40.60%

Measure E

Yes – 58.18%
No – 40.82%

Measure F

Yes – 62.71%
No – 37.29%

Measure G

Yes – 98.92%
No – 1.08%

Measure H

Yes – 79.85%
No – 20.15%

Measure I (2/3rds needed)

Yes – 73.74%
No – 26.26%

Find complete results for Marin County.

Guide to Measures A-I

Ballot measures in Marin County range from school district bonds to a parcel tax to provide parks and open space to tax extensions to fund city services. Voting takes place on Nov. 3, 2015. Find your polling place and complete voting information at the Marin County Registrar of Voters website.

School District Measures

Measure A – San Rafael Elementary School District Bond

How the ballot reads: To upgrade and repair school with local funding that cannot be taken by the State, shall San Rafael City Elementary School District update, renovate/construct science, technology, engineering, math/core academic classrooms, replace aging electrical, plumbing/HVAC systems, make classrooms accessible for students with disabilities, repair, construct, acquire/equip classrooms, sites and facilities by issuing $108,225,000 of bonds at legal rates, with citizen oversight, no money for administrators’ salaries, benefits or pensions, and all funds used for San Rafael schools?

In a nutshell: Measure A, if approved, would allow the San Rafael Elementary School District to issue up to $108,225,000 in general obligation bonds for renovations and construction purposes. The measure requires 55 percent voter approval to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

Measure B – San Rafael City High School District Bond

How the ballot reads: To upgrade and repair schools with funding that cannot be taken by the State, shall San Rafael City High School District update, renovate/construct science, technology, engineering, math/core academic classrooms, replace aging electrical, plumbing/HVAC systems, make classrooms accessible for students with disabilities, repair, construct, acquire/equip classrooms, sites and facilities by issuing $160,500,000 of bonds at legal rates, with citizen oversight, no money for administrators’ salaries, benefits or pensions, and all funds used for local high schools?

In a nutshell: Measure B, if approved, would allow the San Rafael High School District to issue up to $160,500,000 in general obligation bonds for renovations and construction purposes. The measure requires 55 percent voter approval to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

City Measures

Measure C – City of Novato Sales Tax Extension

How the ballot reads: To continue funding, that cannot be taken by the State, for general city services including, but not limited to, protecting neighborhood police patrols, 9-1-1 emergency response, crime prevention/gang intervention services; fixing potholes, streets, parks; attracting/retaining qualified police officers; supporting the local economy/increasing jobs; and providing youth, senior, recreation programs, shall the City of Novato extend the existing voter approved sales tax, reducing the rate from 1/2 cent to 1/4 cent, requiring oversight and audits?

In a nutshell: If approved, a voter-approved sales tax set to expire on March 31, 2016, would be extended. The current sales tax of 0.5 percent would also drop to 0.25 percent if the measure is adopted. Funds can be used for general city services. Measure C requires majority voter approval to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

Measure D – Town of San Anselmo

How the ballot reads: Shall an ordinance be adopted to amend the San Anselmo General Plan to do the following: prohibit the use of Memorial Park as a flood detention basin; prevent any non-recreational uses that adversely affect or reduce Memorial Park’s current recreational amenities; and require voter approval before the park can be sold or transferred by the Town?

In a nutshell: Measure D, if approved, would permit only recreational activities in Memorial Park. The measure prohibits use of the park as a flood detention basin. Measure D is competing against Measure E. Measure D requires majority voter support to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

Measure E – Town of San Anselmo

How the ballot reads: Shall an ordinance be adopted to amend the Town’s General Plan to affirm continued use of Memorial Park as primarily a recreational facility and to permit accessory use of Memorial Park for flood control by way of a detention basin only if a majority of voters approves a specific plan detailing development of the park for flood control following environmental review?

In a nutshell: Measure E, if approved, would reserve Memorial Park as a place primarily for recreational uses, but would also allow the space to be used as a flood detention basin. Measure E is competing against Measure D. Measure E requires majority approval to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

Measure F – City of Sausalito

How the ballot reads: City of Sausalito No-Tax-Increase Park Improvement/Safety Measure. To bring Robin Sweeny Park, Southview Park, Dunphy Park and the MLK site to current health/safety standards; repair unsafe children’s playground equipment, upgrade safety lighting, pathways and play courts; add needed restrooms; restore wetlands/natural areas, shall the City of Sausalito enter into an agreement with the Sausalito Financing Authority and permit revenue from the MLK site to be used as revenue financing, with no increase in taxes?

In a nutshell: If approved, Measure F would allow Sausalito to lease the MLK site and use revenue to fund local parks. Measure F requires majority voter approval to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

Measure G – Inverness Public Utility District

How the ballot reads: Shall the appropriations limit established for the Inverness Public Utility District pursuant to Article XIIIB of the California Constitution be adjusted to include the combined total of all applicable revenue sources for the fiscal years 2015/2016 through 2017/2018 in order to ensure an adequate funding base for the Inverness Public Utility District?

In a nutshell: Measure G, if approved, would increase the spending cap of the Inverness Public Utility District for two years. The measure needs majority voter approval to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

Measure H – Marinwood Community Services District

How the ballot reads: Shall the appropriations limit established for Marinwood Community Services District pursuant to Article XIIIB of the California Constitution be increased over the appropriations limit established by said article for each of the four fiscal years 2016-2017 through 2019-2020 in the amount equal to the revenue received from the special tax for fire protection and emergency services previously approved by the voters in November, 2011?

In a nutshell: Measure H, if approved, would increase the spending cap of the Marinwood Community Services District for four years. The measure requires majority voter approval to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

Measure I – Marinwood Community Services District

How the ballot reads: “To provide park, open space and street landscape maintenance, shall an ordinance be adopted to replace the existing special tax of $189.56 per parcel with a special tax of $189.56 per unit on each parcel within the Marinwood Community Services District, with an annual cost of living adjustment, and to increase the District appropriations limit by the amount of the proceeds received from the special tax?”

In a nutshell: Measure I, if approved, would change an existing $189.56 parcel tax from a “rate per parcel” to a $189.56 “rate per unit.” Thus, a parcel with multiple units would be taxed at $189.56 times the number of units on the parcel. The measure would also increase the Marinwood Community Service District’s spending cap. Measure I needs two-thirds voter approval to pass.

Read the full text with arguments for and against

Results for Marin County 2015 Ballot Measures A to I 4 November,2015Don Clyde

Author

Don Clyde

Don Clyde is an online producer, reporter and copy editor for KQED News. Before venturing into journalism, he worked as a medical device engineer and scientist for nearly a decade after earning a degree in physics from UC Berkeley. He loves travel, reading, living in Oakland, and most importantly, a good walk. Email him at dclyde@kqed.org or follow him @clydedon.

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