“Mini Geek-Fest” Meeting Tonight for Educators

You’re not necessarily a geek if you like technology, but that’s what this group of educators is calling its monthly meeting: the Mini Geek-Fest. Every month, they meet online to talk about their most interesting discoveries in classroom teaching tools, websites, and other subjects as they come up. Teachers who participate even get one professional … Continue reading “Mini Geek-Fest” Meeting Tonight for Educators →

College Professors and Students Jump into the Wiki World

Picking up the thread of the past few days about Wikipedia‘s standing as a reliable source of information, more news surfaced in the past week surrounding the issue. USA Today reported that nine professors from prominent colleges including Harvard and Georgetown “agreed to make creating, augmenting, and editing Wikipedia entries part of their students’ coursework.” … Continue reading College Professors and Students Jump into the Wiki World →

Blogs: Another Great Teaching Tool

Middle-school and high-school teachers are using blogs as a way to enhance communication, develop lessons taught in class, solicit responses, and introduce best practices in the multimedia world to their students. Heather Wolpert-Gawron, aka TweenTeacher, has mastered the nuances of teaching her students how to blog. Among some of the tips, she suggests showing them … Continue reading Blogs: Another Great Teaching Tool →

How to Read the News: Journalists’ Perspective

As journalists, we’re taught to find multiple sources to support a fact — or at the very least one highly reliable source. And so it goes with teaching students how to read and interpret “news.” Information comes at us from all manner of sources — blogs, websites, institutions, newspapers — and even the most discerning … Continue reading How to Read the News: Journalists’ Perspective →

New Stanford Program for Innovators

Flickr: Jeff Pearce Last year, after attending Stanford University’s Summer Institute for Entrepreneurship, one of the students came away with a pending iPhone app for an educational math game called Motion Math. Though he’d conceived of the idea before starting the program, he was able to connect with collaborators from Stanford’s School of Education, as … Continue reading New Stanford Program for Innovators →

The Value of Technology in Education

The response to the KQED Forum show yesterday about the use of technology in education has been lively. One commenter believes that “edutainment, gizmos, and gadgetry do not belong in the classroom,” while another wrote, “It’s apparent we’ll always be more enamored with our tech toys than with doing the work of developing emotional/relational skills.” … Continue reading The Value of Technology in Education →

Online-Only Classes Get Mixed Reviews

I linked earlier today to a story in the New York Times about a recent report that found a group of students did “noticeably worse” in online classes than their in-classroom counterparts. According to the report, 312 university undergrads were divided into two groups: one online and one in classroom lectures. From the article: Hispanic … Continue reading Online-Only Classes Get Mixed Reviews →

Milton Chen and MindShift on KQED’s Forum

In a discussion with Michael Krasny earlier today on the KQED program Forum, Milton Chen and I discussed a wide range of subjects, including Milton’s new book “Education Nation: Six Leading Edges of Innovation in our Schools,” the role of open-source information such as Wikipedia in the classroom, and how technology affects creativity in kids, … Continue reading Milton Chen and MindShift on KQED’s Forum →

Treasure Trove of Tech Tools for Teachers

Anthony Armstrong is an eighth-grade social studies teacher at Del Mar Middle School in Tiburon, Calif. I’ve asked him to check in regularly about all the ways in which he uses the benefits of technology in his classroom. Here’s his first guest blog. By Anthony Armstrong The Internet provides a wealth of digital assets for … Continue reading Treasure Trove of Tech Tools for Teachers →

School 2.0: How Learning is Changing

Educators must help their students be critical consumers of information. So says Jeff Livingston, Senior Vice President of McGraw-Hill Education Group, where he’s responsible for product development and marketing in curriculum areas, including developing Web 2.0 tools and resources. I spoke with Jeff recently about changes brewing in the education space. Q. How do you … Continue reading School 2.0: How Learning is Changing →

Online Word Games with Distant Pals

Last week, a reader asked about playing Scrabble-type word games online with a friend who moved to a different city. As one who’s stayed up late into the night strategizing the highest value words against friendly opponents, I can make a few recommendations. If you’ve got a Facebook account, you can sign up for the … Continue reading Online Word Games with Distant Pals →

The World Wide Web: Accessible to All Students

While it’s important to protect students from danger at school, some in the education community also recognize that giving them access to all the benefits of the web is just as integral to their education. Two interesting articles have come up in this vein. – The Racine Unified School District recently removed the firewalls that … Continue reading The World Wide Web: Accessible to All Students →

To Skip or Not to Skip (a College Class)?

Skipping college classes is par for the course when it comes to higher learning, especially if you think of the experience as a four-year continuum. Who among us has not decided — for better or for worse — to forgo a lecture for an afternoon of productive studying, unavoidable appointments, or even just simple decompressing. … Continue reading To Skip or Not to Skip (a College Class)? →

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