4 Ways to Keep up with MindShift

Sometimes we need prompts to remind us to check in on websites we like. To that end, here’s a list of ways you can have those pleasant reminders appear in web spaces you already inhabit. Bookmark the site on your browser, so it’s front and center on your Bookmark Toolbar. Subscribe to the RSS feed. … Continue reading 4 Ways to Keep up with MindShift →

“Waiting for Superman”: Coming Soon

Next week, the movie “Waiting for Superman” will be released to much fanfare and media attention. Made by the director of “An Inconvenient Truth,” this documentary is a call-to-action for everyone in the education community to start instituting major reform within what’s known as the broken public education system. I haven’t yet seen the film, … Continue reading “Waiting for Superman”: Coming Soon →

New York Times Magazine Highlights Education

I’m excited this weekend to receive the tell-tale blue bag on my doorstep — the New York Times, which will be bundled with the Sunday magazine’s Education Issue. Though I’ll probably read most of the articles online (I linked to the story about teaching with video games on Wednesday), the print issue’s a keeper. Here’s … Continue reading New York Times Magazine Highlights Education →

No Facebook for a Week?

It was, indeed, an ambitious goal: to ban the very lifeblood of modern-day students — their access to Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, and AOL Messenger — for an entire week. But that’s what Eric Darr, the provost at the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, did this week, and according to a USA Today article, it … Continue reading No Facebook for a Week? →

Detecting Plagiarism with Online Tools

The Internet has made everything easier — and more complicated — including plagiarism. In addition to being able to buy completed research papers online, students can also copy and paste directly from websites to their assignments (instead of copying reference books from the library). But teachers have their tricks, too. Online tools (balancing out that … Continue reading Detecting Plagiarism with Online Tools →

Use of E-Textbooks to Grow With iPads

Interesting quote by a prescient analyst about the future of textbooks, in this article in ABC News about the growth of iPad in classrooms. “Long term, the biggest threat to publishers will be if there’s some kind of major adoption of open access (free course material), meaning there is a change in how college instructors … Continue reading Use of E-Textbooks to Grow With iPads →

College Credit for Video Games

Video games are not just rich school curriculum for sixth graders, as I posted yesterday. As U.C. Berkeley did last year, the University of Florida is offering a two-credit class called “21st Century Skills in StarCraft” to teach resource-management and decision-making skills, as well as critical thinking and adaptive decision-making. As an ecampus news article … Continue reading College Credit for Video Games →

Video Games in the Classroom? Yes!

What place do video games have in a classroom? Aren’t they just a distracting waste of time for kids who should be memorizing multipication tables? Sara Corbett eloquently answers these questions in her illuminating article in the New York Times, which aptly sums up some of the controversies around bringing technology into the education system. … Continue reading Video Games in the Classroom? Yes! →

Online Word Games for Home or School

Last week, I wrote a post about word games like Scrabble that friends can play with each other online. But for those who want to practice on their own at home, or for teachers who can display a computer monitor on a projector or has a SmartBoard, there are some addictive online games. I found … Continue reading Online Word Games for Home or School →

Tony Smith: Technology Will Make the Need for Human Interaction Stronger

Yesterday, I posted the first part of my interview with Tony Smith, Superintendent of Oakland Unified School District, who said that content offered through California’s Digital Textbook Initiative is not yet transformative. Here, he talks about all the ways in which teachers are taking initiative in bringing technology to the classroom, and the importance of … Continue reading Tony Smith: Technology Will Make the Need for Human Interaction Stronger →

“Secrets of College Admission” Webcast Today

WSJ On Campus, a college information resource from The Wall Street Journal and Unigo.com, will present a free, interactive webcast called “The Secrets of College Admissions: What You Need to Know To Get In” today at 7:00 PM EST.  The 90-minute webcast will stream live on the homepage of WSJ On Campus: http://wsj.unigo.com. “The Secrets … Continue reading “Secrets of College Admission” Webcast Today →

Will College Bookstores Become Obsolete?

There’s been some controversy brewing over at ZNet Education, where blogger Christopher Dawson has raised the ire of college bookstores. Last Friday, Dawson went into detail about what he calls “the textbook racket,” and suggested that, to save money, college students forgo their campus bookstores in favor of renting books, buying used ones from Amazon, … Continue reading Will College Bookstores Become Obsolete? →

6 Easy Ways to Protect Your Data

The more time we spend working, learning, and living, the more data we amass. We’ve been warned to back up our hard drives religiously — and for good reason. You never know when your screen will suddenly go black, never to return to life. For students of all ages who’ll be creating important content that … Continue reading 6 Easy Ways to Protect Your Data →

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