Big Ideas

The latest findings from experts in the field related to the future of learning.

Doomed or Lucky? Predicting the Future of the Internet Generation

Looking into the proverbial crystal ball, a slew of technology experts weighed in on the Future of the Internet V survey conducted by Pew Research and Elon University, and came up with a predictably mixed scenario: It’s complicated. Asked to consider the future of the Internet-connected world between now and 2020 and to choose from … Continue reading Doomed or Lucky? Predicting the Future of the Internet Generation →

A Look Inside the Digital Lives of Tweens

Getty The following are excerpts from from “Kids Closer Up: Playing, Learning, and Growing with Digital Media” by Lori Takeuchi, International Journal of Learning and Media, Spring 2011, Vol. 3, No. 2, Pages 37-59. To protect the children’s identities, all names are pseudonyms, and location details have been altered. While large-scale surveys have documented the … Continue reading A Look Inside the Digital Lives of Tweens →

What’s On the Horizon in Higher Education

Flickr: Dexterwas How will college life be different in five years than it is today? In its recently released 2012 NMC Horizon Report on Higher Education, New Media Consortium predicts there may be more gesture-based computing, and lots of inter-connected (and Internet-connected) objects packed with useful information. Video games will become more commonplace in classrooms, … Continue reading What’s On the Horizon in Higher Education →

Beyond Strategy and Winning, How Games Teach Kids Empathy

Getty By Annie Murphy Paul Until I had children, I couldn’t be bothered with playing games. Couldn’t stand poker, pinochle or gin rummy. Bored out of my mind by Sorry! and Stratego. Never understood the appeal of chess, checkers or backgammon. But once I had kids, games took on a new appeal. Apart from entertaining … Continue reading Beyond Strategy and Winning, How Games Teach Kids Empathy →

Discovering How to Learn Smarter

Getty By Annie Murphy Paul It’s not often that a story about the brain warms the heart. But that’s exactly what happened to me when I read an article last month in the Washington Post. It’s about how teachers in many schools in the D.C. area are foregoing empty praise of the “Good job!” variety, … Continue reading Discovering How to Learn Smarter →

How to Judge if Research is Trustworthy

B. Gilliard [UPDATE Feb. 3, 2012: Please see additional clarification from both of the researchers of the studies cited in this article below.] Scientists are notorious for questioning the veracity of publicized research — and with good reason. They want to know: Who conducted the research? Where was it published? What were the survey questions? … Continue reading How to Judge if Research is Trustworthy →

With Media, Parents and Kids Learn More Together

Most of what we read about kids and screen time revolves around whether or not it’s good for them. But one aspect of media use with kids that’s worth examining closer is how co-viewing affects their experience. Whether kids are watching TV, creating digital media, reading, searching, or playing video games with parents, siblings or … Continue reading With Media, Parents and Kids Learn More Together →

What’s So Great About Schools in Finland?

Finland has been hailed for exemplifying the ideal model of a thriving, innovative education system that prioritizes the most important stakeholders: students. International and American media are fascinated by the Scandinavian country’s approach to designing the education system. The fact that Finland manages to score among the top three countries on the PISA survey is … Continue reading What’s So Great About Schools in Finland? →

Girls and Math: Busting the Stereotype

Do girls need special attention when it comes to science, math, and technology topics? In response to last week’s article about Techbridge, the after-school science program specifically geared to girls, some readers strongly refuted the notion that girls need the extra nudge. “‘Steering’ something suggests directing it in a path it would not normally, of … Continue reading Girls and Math: Busting the Stereotype →

Kids Online: the Risks and the Realities

TB The Internet seems like another member of the family sometimes. It lives in our home and follows us wherever we go, it vies for our attention, and it entertains us. The habits we fall into around our online lives has a profound effect on our family relationships, especially when it comes to parents and … Continue reading Kids Online: the Risks and the Realities →

Educators: Define Achievement!

Audiophilage In the discussion over learning styles and measuring achievements, it’s important to take into account what educators see first-hand in class. To get a sense of their perspective on the subjects, I asked educators who are part of the Powerful Learning Practice to weigh in on what they’ve observed in their classrooms. Here’s what … Continue reading Educators: Define Achievement! →

Scratching that (Incessant) Technology Itch

Lenny Gonzales Our love-hate relationship with technology is the subject of research psychologist Dr. Larry D. Rosen’s new book iDisorder. From his perspective, “tech gadgets and applications are turning us into basket-cases suffering from versions of obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit syndrome,” according to a recent HechingerEd blog. Rosen also spoke at last year’s Learning & … Continue reading Scratching that (Incessant) Technology Itch →

Three Goals to Spark Innovation and Collaboration

Flickr: Spacepleb It’s been roughly two months since the launch of the Department of Education’s Digital Promise, and though it’s still very early in the process, a few pointed goals are emerging. The main premise behind Digital Promise is to serve as a national center for research to spur innovation that will improve learning through … Continue reading Three Goals to Spark Innovation and Collaboration →

Why Aren’t Students Using E-Books?

Kathryn Though we keep hearing about a huge increase in sales of e-books, a recent survey shows that, for students, that needle has not really moved much. The library e-book provider eBrary released some of the preliminary results from its 2011 Global Student E-Book Survey last week. Among its findings: that students’ e-book usage has … Continue reading Why Aren’t Students Using E-Books? →