Katrina Schwartz

Katrina Schwartz is a journalist based in San Francisco. She’s worked at KPCC public radio in LA and has reported on air and online for KQED since 2010. She’s a staff writer for KQED’s education blog MindShift.

Empathy: the Key to Social and Emotional Learning

Educators are aware that social problems like poverty, unsafe neighborhoods, violence, and family trauma can affect how students learn when they come to school. Though teaching subjects like math and literacy are the biggest part of their job, in many cases they’re also called on to attend to their students’ emotional health as well, incorporating … Continue reading Empathy: the Key to Social and Emotional Learning →

Experimenting and Innovating: How to Find the Best Tools and Tactics

New York City is experimenting with new tools and tactics with its Innovation Zone, a devoted unit for trying out new approaches to learning and sharing best practices with like-minded educators. The iZone, as it’s commonly called, started in the 2010-11 school year with 81 schools, and since then, they’ve more than doubled that number … Continue reading Experimenting and Innovating: How to Find the Best Tools and Tactics →

Shifting Tactics: Rocketship Will Change its Computer Lab Model

Rocketship Education, a network of charter schools based in California, is changing the way students will use computers in its Learning Labs. Rather than spending chunks of time in computer labs with divided computer stations, students will be using computers in their classrooms, with the help of teachers and aids. “The integration between the classroom … Continue reading Shifting Tactics: Rocketship Will Change its Computer Lab Model →

Where Are All Those Ed Tech Dollars Going?

Getty The largest segment of the $7.76 billion ed-tech market, according to the industry group SIIA is “instructional support,” which accounts for up to 38 percent of the market — and that’s increased by 12 percent over the previous year. Companies within the “instructional support” space earned $892 million, with assessment and testing products registering … Continue reading Where Are All Those Ed Tech Dollars Going? →

Faces of the New Higher Ed: Learning By Working

Enstitute Going to college used to be the prescribed path to success, but today, students are considering different options. The cost of a college education is soaring and many students are graduating with tens of thousands of dollars in debt. One response to the high cost of secondary education are Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) … Continue reading Faces of the New Higher Ed: Learning By Working →

Girls and Games: What’s the Attraction?

Games are increasingly recognized by educators as a way to get kids excited about learning. While the stereotype of a “gamer” may evoke the image of a high school boy holed up in a dark room playing on a console, in reality 62 percent of gamers play with other people either in person or online, … Continue reading Girls and Games: What’s the Attraction? →

Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying

Getty Getting enough sleep is an under-valued but crucial part of learning. Contrary to students’ belief that staying up all night to cram for an exam will lead to higher scores, truth is, the need for a good night’s rest is even more important than finishing homework or studying for a test. A recent study … Continue reading Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying →

How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World?

Educators are always striving to find ways to make curriculum relevant in students’ everyday lives. More and more teachers are using social media around lessons, allowing students to use their cell phones to do research and participate in class, and developing their curriculum around projects to ground learning around an activity. These strategies are all … Continue reading How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World? →

How Simple Ideas Lead to Scientific Discoveries

In this TED-Ed video “How Simple Ideas Lead to Scientific Discoveries,” Adam Savage, best known for Mythbusters fame, explains how some of the most fundamental discoveries in science came from simple and creative ideas about how to solve problems. We’re all “meat and water,” he says, and we all have the capacity to work at … Continue reading How Simple Ideas Lead to Scientific Discoveries →

What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t

Screenshot/High Tech High The term “project-based learning” gets tossed around a lot in discussions about how to connect students to what they’re learning. Teachers might add projects meant to illustrate what students have learned, but may not realize what they’re doing is actually called “project-oriented learning.” And it’s quite different from project-based learning, according to … Continue reading What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t →

Online Privacy: Parents Worry Advertisers Know Too Much

The Federal Trade Commission recently reprimanded makers of mobile apps targeted at children for failing to provide enough information to parents about the kinds of data being collected. The announcement raises a long-standing concern many parents have about how to keep kids safe online. A recent study from the Pew Center’s Internet and American Life … Continue reading Online Privacy: Parents Worry Advertisers Know Too Much →

Top 10 Posts of 2012: Deep, Meaningful and Creative Learning

Flickr: CriCristina It may come as no surprise that the ideas that are top-of-mind for educators, parents, and policymakers are the very topics conveyed in the most popular MindShift posts this year. Giving kids the tools to create, teachers the freedom to innovate, making students’ work relevant in the real world, giving them access to … Continue reading Top 10 Posts of 2012: Deep, Meaningful and Creative Learning →

For Low-Income Kids, Is More Time in School the Answer?

TB To help disadvantaged kids who are struggling to keep up in school, some education advocates believe that extending the school day could give them the extra boost they need. They argue that many parents can’t afford to send their kids to the varied extracurricular activities that wealthier children enjoy – leaving poorer kids with a sparse … Continue reading For Low-Income Kids, Is More Time in School the Answer? →