Welcome to yet another episode of DACA drama.

On Tuesday, a federal judge in San Francisco temporarily blocked the Trump administration’s decision announced in September to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program by early March 2018.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco ruled that the administration must temporarily “maintain the DACA program on a nationwide basis” at least until lawsuits filed by California and other states play out in court.

In his ruling, which Trump wasted no time assailing, Alsup wrote that lawyers for the immigrants’ “have clearly demonstrated that they are likely to suffer serious, irreparable harm,” unless the court steps in with an injunction.

Introduced as an executive action by President Obama in June 2012, DACA was intended to give temporary protection against deportation to certain groups of young undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children. DACA recipients can also obtain work permits and driver’s licenses, although the program offers no path to citizenship or permanent residency.

Since 2012, nearly 800,000 young people have received DACA status.

Critics call the Trump administration’s actions unjust, arguing that most DACA recipients have lived most of their lives in the U.S. and were brought here through no fault of their own. But proponents of the recent decision argue that Obama’s action was an abuse of executive power. Some also claim that at DACA recipients take jobs away from native-born Americans and drive up crime. This argument, however, has been generally refuted.

Scroll through this interactive timeline to see DACA’s tumultuous path since it took effect five years ago. Below that, listen to our recent interview with a UC Berkeley student and DACA recipient.

 

Nava in a recent photo taken from the U.S.-Mexico border. (Courtesy Dalia Nava)

In 2003, at the age of 8, Dalia Nava and her mother and sister left their native Mexico and crossed illegally into the United States, settling in East Los Angeles. After graduating from high school, Dalia received DACA status. Today she is a senior at UC Berkeley, majoring in political science. KQED’s Stephanie Thatcher spoke with Dalia just days after the Trump administration announced plans to end the program.

TIMELINE: Inside the Epic, Ongoing, Battle over DACA 10 January,2018Matthew Green

  • Curious

    Illegals are a huge financial and social drain on this country and must be deported.

    • yuliana cortorreal

      No

      • yuliana cortorreal

        Incorrect

        • ^^

        • KeViN RiLeY

          shut up

        • yuliana cortorreal

          how do i delete a comment

          • Irad

            you press delete

    • paola C

      no because if you think about it it has helped so many people and we have immigrants that have helped in society and all these people have contributed to the world

    • Carissa_Godinez

      No, the illegals are not a huge financial drain. Maybe you think you have the right to say stuff like that because you have the freedom of speech but just think about all the families that would be torn apart. If you were undocumented and had to be deported, without your family. Just think of how this DACA program helps other.

  • iemci lozada

    The DACA program is really important for the students that didn’t born in the U.S, and that they don’t have a legal document in orden to get in to college, to get a job, and this people had to live in the shadows for a long time because they feel scared to get deported and to get to a bad life in Mexico, or from the country where they originally immigrated from, some people want to take DACA away, they wanna take it because they ever had to pass threw all this things that “illegal” people had to pass, they don’t know how is the feel to live day to day with fearfully to be deported, to not being the person who they want to be, to have a educations, a career, a degree, and to be an example that if you want to you can, even being “illegal” a lot of American people they had all the doors opened, and they didn’t take the opportunity to be someone in life, they ended being in prison, homeless, and a lot of people from different countries come here to have better opportunities in life, they come o America having a dream they are good people they just want a chance to be a someone in life, and to prepared for life, I think those persons that want to take DACA should think about it twice, and i want they to think what would you do if someone closed to you, or someone from your family, or you are illegal, what would you do, how would you feel about it?.

    • bianca gudino

      I agree with what you said about how they wanna take out DACA just because they don’t know how it feels to be Illegal just in general the struggles .

    • Itzia Gutierrez

      I completely agree with this, everyone should be allowed to live freely.

    • Desirae.g

      You mentioned a lot of important points and I agree with what you’ve said.

  • Pedro Rivera

    George Bush doesn’t care about black people.

    • Irad

      I agree

      • yuliana cortorreal

        Yeah

  • paul guerrero

    DACA is important but it does take a lot to maintain daca and its 800,000 recipients

    • KeViN RiLeY

      are u dumb

    • Yovani Arce

      That’s true but, the government has enough power to make this act happen. This is what Obama did when he made the DACA act during his presidency.

    • Miguel Moreno

      yeah

    • Sergio

      I agree

  • Alex Rangel

    The DACA program has given life opportunities to approximately 800,000 undocumented people in the United States. It is in charge of giving work permits, giving education and allowing them to live as an American, to those who were brought to the United States at a young age but is not documented. It is very important to consider that DACA has not only helped people, but also the country financially. Since they have allowed more people to come into the United States, everyone has contributed socially and economically which essentially helps the county develop. The DACA program is a life saver for many.

    • yuliana cortorreal

      I agree

      • Ximena Rojas-Arvide

        i agree, it gives people who enter the country as minors opportunities to build a better life.

      • Linda R.

        I agree with you, not only has DACA helped undocumented people, but also help our country financially.

    • Jennifer G.

      Agreed, people say immigrants are negatively affecting our society and economy but they are honestly not.

    • daniela navarro

      “The DACA program is a life saver for many”, I agree.

    • paola C

      I agree because it has helped so many people have a better life and helped them have a better education than they would of had and all the opportunities that were given to them were a huge help

  • Yovani Arce

    The DACA act is a very crucial thing that wouldn’t be a good idea to end because many immigrants have benefited from this act. Many people now live way better lives than they used to before coming the the U.S and joining the DACA act. With this act many immigrants have gained confidence in this country. Therefore this has given these immigrants some hope and confidence.

    • Alex Rangel

      i totally agree with you! It has given hope and confidence to all people who felt like they had nothing.

      • Ximena Rojas-Arvide

        i agree

    • Abel Hernandez

      I agree with you

    • Carissa_Godinez

      i agree with your statement, i agree that the program gives them hope to be with their families.

  • KeViN RiLeY

    Deport 2pac

    • yuliana cortorreal

      He’s in vegas

  • Sergio

    DACA is the acronym in English of a program launched by then President Barack Obama to protect from deportation and grant work permits to immigrants brought to the United States without authorization.

  • Diego Avila

    The DACA organization is very beneficial to the people who were brought into the country when they were children and are now searching for jobs or college educations. Without DACA, these people are threatened with getting deported from their homes every day.

  • KeViN RiLeY
    • Irad

      I agree w u

  • Miguel Moreno

    DACA, which was passed as part of the Obama administration’s immigration policy in June 2012, allowed some individuals who entered the country illegally as minors to receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and be eligible for a work permit.

    • Diego Avila

      These permits are allowing people to pursue their dreams and giving them the same opportunities citizens are getting.

  • vanessa paredes

    DACA is a foundation that helps individuals as minors come to America

    • Ximena Rojas-Arvide

      i agree with you

  • Jennifer G.

    DACA has been a protection for many immigrants. It prevents undocumented people from being deported from the United States. Donald Trump wants to take this program away. If he does this then many students might lose their work permits, health care, and might even get deported. Some people do not have anywhere to go if they get sent back to their home country. 800,000 recipients use the DACA program and it is hard to help all but it is better to try since we say America is “great”. This program should not removed because it gave many people good opportunities that they did not get in their home country. They deserve to live feeling safe and comfortable.

  • Ximena Rojas-Arvide

    DACA is the program that helps the people who enter the U.S as minors, and they enter the country illegally, they give them opportunities to go to school, or work like everybody else.

    • vanessa paredes

      I agree with your statement

  • Linda R.

    DACA has helped nearly 800,000 young adults pursue their dreams of attending college, getting work permits, getting a driver’s license, and overall just have a better life in this country. DACA protects them from being deported because they’re illegal. However, Trump now wants to rescind DACA. This leaves the 800,000 DACA recipients in fear. They fear deportation back to the country the originally came from. Ending DACA would leave these people without anything.

    • Samantha

      I agree with you because its something related to what I commented and you’re right ending DACA would leave people without anything.

  • Pedro Rivera

    DACA protects young undocumented immigrants who were brought to the united states as children. It temporally protects them from deportation

    • Irad

      are you dumb, pay attention

  • KeViN RiLeY
  • Irad

    DACA protects a lot of illegal immigrants. 800,000 people want to go chase their dreams of going to college etc. DACA protects them from being deported and it basically protects them. They fear deportation. Ending DACA would leave these people without anything. We should leave it up to protect them.

  • paola C

    Daca is an American immigration policy that permits people who entered the us as minors and have stayed in the country as illegals. The amount of time that is given is two years where they can stay in the us and have the ability to have an American education and work. About 800,000 people enrolled in daca. The daca program has worked to benefit so many people that have come to the united states to have a better life.

    • Alexis

      I agree with all you have said

    • daniela navarro

      I 100% agree.

    • nasir kelly

      i agree

  • Since 2012, nearly 800,000 young people have received DACA status. DACA protects illegal immigrants, and gives them a chance to become whom they would like to be.

  • KeViN RiLeY
  • yuliana cortorreal

    DACA has presented many opportunities to immigrants in the United States. I am thankful for DACA since it has helped our community, and it has given people a chance to have their American freedoms. It also allows them to live without the fear of being deported.

    • Irad

      I think the same.

  • bianca gudino

    Ik that DACA Is a program were it allows most people who enter the U.S as minor and been there undocumented .I think its important because it helps the children that have know one from they re family to have a opportunity to be successful in life .Now that the DACA person is accepted they can now use their security to prroof your sge.

    • iemci lozada

      I agree with you! the DACA program is very important for a lot of people that come here in the U.S having a dream for a better life, and now they are about to be deported.

  • Desirae.g

    The DACA program is great because it helps illegals gain work permits and driver’s license but what does it matter…if they can still get deported back to where they came from? I believe more should be done to help them gain citizenship.

  • Alexis

    DACA has given their program members the chance to make a better life for themselves by giving them the power and encouragement to go to school without the fear that they are going to get deported. If DACA is taking away, the president is taking away the chance for the people to make a better life for themselves and their family.

  • Abel Hernandez

    Taking away the DACA act means that it would change the undocumented people forever. Those people have gotten a chance of education and do to much more with DACA and if you take away the act that means no more opportunities. It would be sad for the DACA program to be taken down because it has given the undocumented hope of becoming something big in this country. They also take more advantage of the education than the people who are already legalized in the United States. Those illegal people will be the one’s to change the success of the United States.

    • Paola Hernandez

      i agree

  • Samantha

    DACA is very important and helpful for people who are undocumented and want an education. For example about 800,000 people have gotten good things out of it for example getting jobs and attending school , college etc. Also it could prevent people from getting deported.

  • daniela navarro

    DACA helps other people to change the world, this program give you opportunities to work or study like the other people, 800,000 people are in DACA program.

  • Paola Hernandez

    DACA is a program that temporarily protects young immigrants from being deported and offers opportunities such as work permits and drivers license. Trump states that immigrants take the jobs of American workers but this statement is false and generally refuted because immigrants contribute to the economy whether they are here legally or not. Immigrants provide labor for American employers and take the jobs no rich American wants to have. American employers also create jobs for Americans by opening businesses.

  • Carissa_Godinez

    I feel bad that There is young kids that will only have temporary protection, and Alsup wrote that lawyers for the immigrants’- “have clearly demonstrated that they are likely to suffer serious, irreparable harm.” The DACA act is a very important program so it wouldn’t be a good idea to end it because many immigrants or so called dreamers have benefited from this act. By getting rid of this program, they would be ruining many lives for many have benefited from The program DACA.

  • Irad

  • Itzia Gutierrez

    DACA isn’t harming anyone, I don’t see why the president felt the need to terminate the program. Illegal immigrants do no harm to the United States, it’s the government who’s doing harm to them by taking away their basic rights.

  • nasir kelly

    Overall, The purpose of DACA is to protect eligible immigrant youth who came to the United States when they were children from deportation. In addition, the Daca program is very critical for immigration because it defends them from having to get deported. In addition, DACA gives them the ability to have both a job and the education needed in America.

Author

Matthew Green

Matthew Green produces and edits The Lowdown, KQED’s multimedia news education blog, an online resource for educators and the general public. He previously taught journalism at Fremont High School in East Oakland, and has written for numerous local publications, including the Oakland Tribune and San Francisco Chronicle. Email: mgreen@kqed.org; Twitter: @MGreenKQED

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