race

Invited guests watch the film 'Black Panther' in 3D which featuring Oscar-winning Mexico born Kenyan actress Lupita Nyongo during Movie Jabbers Black Panther Cosplay Screening in Nairobi, Kenya, on February 14, 2018.

In a recent article for The New York Times Magazine, Oakland-based writer Carvell Wallace describes the significance of Ryan Coogler’s “Black Panther.” The film depicts the mythical African country of Wakanda and was inspired by ideas of the continent as a place of self-realization for Black Americans. Wallace joins us in the studio to discuss how the film challenges conventional representations of race in the media and why, as he writes, the movie “must also function as a place for multiple generations of black Americans to store some of our most deeply held aspirations.”

Why ‘Black Panther’ Is a Defining Moment for Black America (New York Times)

Haroon Moghul is the author of "How to Be a Muslim: An american Story."

In 2001, Haroon Moghul was a student at NYU and a founder of the university’s Islamic Center. But after a crisis of faith he had plans to leave his leadership role. Instead, the 9/11 attacks thrust him into the spotlight as a spokesperson for American Muslims. Now, Moghul is out with a memoir titled “How to Be a Muslim: An American Story.” Moghul joins us to talk about his struggles with bipolar disorder and the “burden” of being a “professional Muslim.”

Guests:
Haroon Moghul,
fellow in Jewish-Muslim Relations, The Shalom Hartman Institute; author, “How to Be a Muslim: An American Story”

A black and white photo of Julie Lythcott-Haims, author of "Real American: A Memoir." She has dark, curly hair and is wearing a necklace.

Julie Lythcott-Haims sold Girl Scout cookies and later ran track in high school. But as a black and biracial woman, Lythcott-Haims says her identity was often questioned, even though she felt as American as her peers. As the descendant of a South Carolina slave and her owner, Lythcott-Haims writes, “I’m so American it hurts,” She joins Forum to talk about her book “Real American: A Memoir”, what it means to be a real American and the racism and microaggressions she faced throughout her life.

Guest:

Julie Lythcott-Haims, author & public speaker, “Real American: A Memoir” and “How to Raise An Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kids for Success”

Related Links:

KQED’s MindShift: Stepping Back from Overparenting: A Stanford Dean’s Perspective

A black and white photo of Julie Lythcott-Haims, author of "Real American: A Memoir." She has dark, curly hair and is wearing a necklace.

Julie Lythcott-Haims sold Girl Scout cookies and later ran track in high school. But as a black and biracial woman, Lythcott-Haims says her identity was often questioned, even though she felt as American as her peers. As the descendant of a South Carolina slave and her owner, Lythcott-Haims writes, “I’m so American it hurts,” She joins Forum to talk about her book “Real American: A Memoir”, what it means to be a real American and the racism and microaggressions she faced throughout her life.

Guest:

Julie Lythcott-Haims, author & public speaker, “Real American: A Memoir” and “How to Raise An Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kids for Success”

Related Links:

KQED’s MindShift: Stepping Back from Overparenting: A Stanford Dean’s Perspective

When Bay Area primary care doctor Vanessa Grubbs discovered that her boyfriend wasn’t getting the donated kidney that he desperately needed, she decided to give him one of her own. During the process, Grubbs discovered racial disparities in the way donated kidneys are allocated: Approximately 1 in 3 transplant candidates are African American, but they receive only 1 in 5 of all donated kidneys. Grubbs joins us in studio to tell the story of her journey from kidney donor to, ultimately, kidney doctor. We’ll also hear about the dialysis industry and why critics think it is overly aggressive and in need of further regulation. We’ll also check in with a Washington Post reporter about the latest with the health care debate on Capitol Hill.

Guests:
Vanessa Grubbs,
associate professor of medicine and a nephrologist, University of California San Francisco; author, “Hundreds of Interlaced Fingers: A Kidney Doctor’s Search for the Perfect Match
Mike DeBonis, congressional reporter, Washington Post

UC Davis sociology professor Bruce Haynes’ comes from a prominent African American family: his grandfather founded the National Urban League and was a protege of W.E.B Dubois. His grandmother was a prominent social scientist and children’s author. Yet, the succeeding generations struggled. Hayne’s book, “Down the Up Staircase,” tells the story of three generations of his Harlem-based family and explores the tenuous status of middle class African Americans. Despite looking like the model black family, Haynes writes that his family was “never secure in our futures, each generation walking a tightrope, one misstep from free fall.”

white lives matter protest

White supremacists who believe Christianity has been diluted by non-whites are turning to an ancient religion called Odinism, where worshipers embrace ancient Norse gods like Thor and Odin. According to Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting, Odinists have been convicted of six cases of domestic terrorism since 2001. Will Carless, a correspondent for Reveal, joins us to explain why the religion is holding wider appeal, particularly for today’s white supremacists.

Read “An Ancient Nordic Religion is Inspiring White Supremacist Jihad” by Will Carless

Guest:
Will Carless, correspondent, Reveal, from the Center for Investigative Reporting

Four Albany High School students who were suspended in March for “liking” or commenting on racist Instagram posts sued the Albany Unified School District last week, accusing it of violating their free speech rights. The posts included a photo of the school’s African-American basketball coach with a noose drawn around his neck, and photos of apes placed side by side with those of students of color. The lawsuit, which follows weeks of emotionally charged exchanges among school community members, also claims that the district failed to provide security for the suspended students, two of whom were assaulted during a restorative justice session. We discuss the lawsuit and student speech in the digital age.

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