Health

Employees of the online review site Yelp watch as New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks at the new East Coast headquarters of the tech company on October 26, 2011 in New York City.

Soon-to-be parents have a new tool to help decide where to have a baby: Yelp. The San Francisco-based consumer review site now includes clinical data on pregnancy procedures such as C-sections, episiotomies, and breastfeeding rates for hospitals. Yelp partnered with the California Health Care Foundation to provide the data for every hospital in the state. Forum discusses the partnership and the effort to make information on health care providers more transparent and accessible.

Yelp Wants to Help You With Your Birth Plan (KQED News)

A man lies in bed with his hands covering his face.

Stress is inevitable. But psychologists are learning more about how to keep it from becoming overwhelming. Midlife, in particular, can bring with it many stressful events: divorce, the death of a parent, a stagnating career. In this hour, we’ll discuss how to develop the coping skills needed to meet the challenges of midlife.

Guests:
Barbara Bradley Hagerty,
author, “Life Reimagined: The Science, Art and Opportunity of Midlife”; former religion correspondent, NPR

Karen Reivich, director of resilience training services, Positive Psychology Center at University of Pennsylvania; author, “The Resilience Factor: 7 Essential Skills for Overcoming Life’s Inevitable Obstacles”

Steven Southwick, professor of psychiatry, post-traumatic stress disorder and resilience at Yale Medical School

When Bay Area primary care doctor Vanessa Grubbs discovered that her boyfriend wasn’t getting the donated kidney that he desperately needed, she decided to give him one of her own. During the process, Grubbs discovered racial disparities in the way donated kidneys are allocated: Approximately 1 in 3 transplant candidates are African American, but they receive only 1 in 5 of all donated kidneys. Grubbs joins us in studio to tell the story of her journey from kidney donor to, ultimately, kidney doctor. We’ll also hear about the dialysis industry and why critics think it is overly aggressive and in need of further regulation. We’ll also check in with a Washington Post reporter about the latest with the health care debate on Capitol Hill.

Guests:
Vanessa Grubbs,
associate professor of medicine and a nephrologist, University of California San Francisco; author, “Hundreds of Interlaced Fingers: A Kidney Doctor’s Search for the Perfect Match
Mike DeBonis, congressional reporter, Washington Post

When Matt Hay found out he was going to lose his hearing permanently, he decided he would memorize all the songs and sounds he didn’t want to forget. So he made the ultimate playlist — from his girlfriend’s voice to songs from his favorite road trip. KQED’s April Dembosky documented his story, and the soundtrack of songs he chose. She joins us to discuss. And we want to hear from you: If you knew you would lose your hearing forever, what songs or sounds would you want to remember?

The Soundtrack of Silence (KQED’s Q’ed Up)

Matt Hay’s Playlist:

Guests:
April Dembosky, health reporter, KQED’s The California Report

How would you celebrate your 80th birthday? If you’re the Dalai Lama, you invite your friend Archbishop Desmond Tutu to your home to talk about joy, peace and the state of the world today. The two spiritual icons met to celebrate the Dalai Lama’s birthday with a week of conversations. Doug Abrams moderated the talks and documented them in “The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World.” He joins us this hour to talk about those conversations and why the two men still find reason to be joyful amid unspeakable atrocities.

teenager holding a phone

Neuroscientist Frances Jensen says that when her two sons became teenagers, she marveled at their ability to stay focused for a test, yet still commit major lapses in judgment almost daily. The contradictions, she explains, have both emotional and physical roots: teens are more affected by stressful situations than adults, and their brains are years from being fully developed. Jensen joins Forum to talk about her book ‘The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults.’

a man bends over in pain

The cost of treating back pain in the U.S. exceeds $100 billion each year — and a good chunk of that money gets spent on worthless treatments. That’s according to journalist and investigative reporter Cathryn Jakobson Ramin, who suffers from chronic back pain herself. Ramin’s new book, “Crooked,” pulls back the curtain on the back pain industry and provides strategies for navigating the plethora of treatment options. What questions do you have?

Cathryn Jakobson Ramin’s Website (mentioned on-air)

teenager holding a phone

Neuroscientist Frances Jensen says that when her two sons became teenagers, she marveled at their ability to stay focused for a test, yet still commit major lapses in judgment almost daily. The contradictions, she explains, have both emotional and physical roots: teens are more affected by stressful situations than adults, and their brains are years from being fully developed. Jensen joins Forum to talk about her book ‘The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults.’

Analyst Corey Weiss, who was disgnosed with Autism as a young boy, works at Mindspark on August 24, 2016 in Santa Monica, California.

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that one percent of the global population has autism spectrum disorder. And while events like Autism Awareness Month have raised the disorder’s profile, a Drexel University study found that about 40 percent of young adults with autism are unemployed. But some tech giants like SAP, Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard Enterprise are actively trying to hire employees with autism. In this hour, we’ll look how employers and employees can both benefit from closing the employment gap for those on the autistic spectrum.

Resources Mentioned on Air

a male doctor and patient look at a screen and talk

All men between the ages of 55 and 69 should have the option of being screened for prostate cancer. That’s according to new guidelines from the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force. It’s a departure from 2012, when the task force discouraged screening for cancer with the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test. The procedure has a significant problem with false positives, which can lead to more testing, which in turn can cause impaired sexual functioning and incontinence. We’ll discuss the new recommendation, which is open for public comment until May 8.

A small fridge for storing breast milk at KQED in San Francisco.

Supervisor Katy Tang wants to make pumping at work easier for breastfeeding moms in San Francisco. Tang introduced legislation last month that would expand current law by requiring employers to provide a lactation space that is private, not a bathroom, has access to electricity and contains a flat surface and a chair. Current law requires employers make reasonable efforts to provide breaks and a location for pumping, but doesn’t contain such specific requirements. Studies have found links between early breastfeeding and health.

Journalist Don Lattin

Over the past 40 years, author Don Lattin has been writing about the beneficial uses of psychedelic drugs. In his new book, “Changing Our Minds: Psychedelic Sacraments and the New Psychotherapy,” the former San Francisco Chronicle religion writer shares stories of neuroscientists, volunteer research subjects and others searching for safe uses of psychedelics. He also recounts his own search for an alternative treatment for depression, which took him from Switzerland to a South American jungle.

Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (Mentioned on Air)

Frank Ostaseski is the author of "The Five Invitations."

While death is inevitable, many of us choose not to think about our own mortality or that of our loved ones. This is not true of Frank Ostaseski, cofounder of San Francisco’s Zen Hospice Project, who has accompanied more than 1,000 people through the intimate process of dying. From a bedside vantage point he has listened to countless regrets and revelations, lessons that he passes on in his new book, “The Five Invitations.” Ostaseski joins us in the studio to talk about what death can teach us about living full lives.

More Information on Frank Ostaseski’s Events

House Republicans, led by Speaker Paul Ryan, released a long-awaited plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Monday. The new legislation, entitled the American Health Care Act, would keep intact the Obamacare provisions for pre-existing conditions, but would eliminate the mandate that all Americans have health insurance and would roll back Medicaid expansion. We discuss the proposed ACA replacement, which still faces some major challenges from both sides of the political aisle.

Read the American Health Care Act

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