Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.
raindrops on a window

A storm that began over the weekend has brought more torrential rain to an already saturated Northern California, with flash flood warnings across the region. The Lake Tahoe area was expecting up to five feet of snow, with an avalanche warning in effect through 7 AM Tuesday.  And at Don Pedro Reservoir near Turlock, the reservoir exceeded capacity, forcing the use of a spillway for the first time since 1997. We’ll get the latest on the most recent storm to hit the region

US President Donald Trump shakes hands with U.S. Army Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster in Palm Beach, Florida, on February 20, 2017

Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster will be President Trump’s new National Security Adviser, according to a White House announcement Monday. McMaster will assume the post vacated by General Michael Flynn, who was forced to resign for misleading Vice President Mike Pence about talks he held with Russia’s ambassador. McMaster is known for his counter-terrorism expertise and criticism of President Bush’s execution of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.   We discuss how McMaster may shape foreign and national security policy under the Trump administration.

George Shultz

In November, former Secretary of State, Labor, and Treasury George P. Shultz offered this advice for President-elect Donald Trump, a man he declined to endorse: “Without allies, you won’t get anywhere.” Shultz has more advice for the new president and Congress in a new Hoover Institution publication, “Blueprint for America,” which covers everything from diplomacy to nuclear proliferation to healthcare reform. He joins us to talk about the book and his career in public life.

U.S. Congressman Eric Swalwell

Democratic Congressman Eric Swalwell, who represents California’s 15th District in the East Bay, joins Forum to discuss his legislative priorities, including reducing student loan debt and fighting the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. We’ll also talk to the Congressman  about his bill to set up a bipartisan commission to investigate Russian interference in the U.S. election and about the fallout from the resignation of National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. The interview is the first in Forum’s series featuring Bay Area members of Congress.

A Greek coast guard captain, Kyriakos Papadopoulos, pulls refugees from the water.

Between 2015 and 2016, 600,000 migrants crossed the water between Turkey and the Greek island of Lesbos, many on small, dangerous inflatable rafts. In her short film “4.1 Miles,” UC Berkeley Journalism alumna Daphne Matziaraki documents the Greek Coast Guard’s overwhelming struggle to save these refugees from drowning. She followed a ship captain for three weeks as he “pulled family after family, child after child, from the ocean and saved their lives,” and looks at his own struggle to make sense of the trauma. Matziaraki joins us in-studio to discuss her film and the ongoing refugee crisis in Greece.

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Mountain-Bike-for-Forum

Mountain biking advocates in Marin County are frustrated at what they see as the slow pace of new trail openings, promised in a 2014 Marin County road and trail management plan. They say that the sport is growing at an annual rate of more than 11 percent and they need more technically challenging trails. But hiking and equestrian groups argue that they are the biggest users of the open space and that the bikers travel too fast for safety and disrupt nature. Forum discusses the issue and hears from both sides of the debate.

Anthony Rendon

Several weeks after the election of President Donald Trump, California Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon said in a speech to lawmakers that the state faced a “major existential threat.” Rendon has since taken vocal stands against the Trump administration’s immigration raids and travel ban, which is now on hold. We’ll talk to Speaker Rendon about the challenges California may face under President Trump and the Assembly’s priorities for this term.

Walter Murch stands behind a laptop.

Prolific film editor and sound designer Walter Murch has been in Hollywood for over half a century, working on such films as “Apocalypse Now,” “The Godfather” and “The English Patient.” But the three time Oscar-winner has another hobby: astrophysics. In his spare time, Murch steps away from the big screen and tries to prove Bode’s Law, a 240-year-old theory on the spacing of the planets in the solar system. Murch joins us to discuss his work in astrophysics and the connections he sees between astronomy and sound editing.

George Saunders poses for a portrait.

Award-winning author George Saunders joins Forum to talk about his debut novel, “Lincoln in the Bardo.” Set in a graveyard at the outset of the Civil War, the story centers on Abraham Lincoln as he grieves for his son Willie, who died of typhoid was he was eleven years old. “Bardo” refers to the Tibetan concept of purgatory, a state Lincoln finds himself in as he mingles with spirits and tries to make sense of his son’s death. We’ll talk to Saunders about the novel, its Buddhist themes and what inspired it.

U.S. President Donald Trump reads from an executive order he signed in the Oval Office of the White House February 9, 2017 in Washington, DC.

In the March issue of The Atlantic, senior editor David Frum imagines an America under President Donald Trump four years from now, when protests have foundered, the media have allied with the President and a weary public has grown indifferent to the loss of individual liberties. Frum says that all of this and worse could come to pass unless people exercise their “duty to resist” President Trump’s authoritarian tendencies. We speak to Frum, who was a speechwriter for President George W. Bush, about the vulnerabilities of democracy under the current administration and what we can do to protect it.

Read: How to Build an Autocracy by David Frum (TheAtlantic.com)

California Aqueduct

On Wednesday, the State Water Resources Control Board voted to extend, through September, California’s existing emergency water conservation regulations and prohibitions against wasting water. We’ll discuss the decision with KQED Science Editor Craig Miller.

Firefighters inspect the Ghost Ship warehouse on December 3, 2016.

The Ghost Ship warehouse in Oakland, site of the December 2016 fire that killed 36 people, had amassed dozens of code enforcement and police visits in the years before the fire, records released Wednesday by the City of Oakland show. Police visited the warehouse to investigate a rave in March of 2015 and code complaints stretch back to 2004. This comes as Oakland’s Fire Chief, Teresa Deloach Reed, is on family leave with no specific return date. Reed had been criticized for the department’s spotty fire safety inspection record. . We’ll discuss the findings with KQED reporter Dan Brekke.