Dave Iverson

Michael Flynn

Michael Flynn resigned as President Trump’s national security advisor on Monday night amid allegations that he misled Vice President Mike Pence on conversations he had with the Russian ambassador about American sanctions in December — before Trump’s inauguration. Trump has named Lt. Gen. Joseph Kellogg acting national security advisor. Forum discusses Flynn’s resignation and its national security implications as Democrats demand a broader investigation into Russian ties.

This aerial view from a California Department of Water Resources drone shows water flowing over the auxiliary spillway at Oroville Dam on Saturday, February 11, 2017, after the lake level exceeded 901 feet elevation above sea level.

Evacuations of over 100,000 people near Oroville Dam remained in effect Monday, as engineers worked to repair damage to an emergency spillway that threatened to send torrents of water into nearby towns. State officials say that the 770-foot dam itself is not in danger and the threat of flooding lessened Monday as Lake Oroville’s water level dropped. But more storms are expected this week, prompting officials to continue to drain water from the lake. We discuss the state of the dam, the ongoing impacts on surrounding communities and the condition of the California’s water infrastructure.

Police Conduct Major Prostitution Sting

Many Bay Area agencies have made fighting sex trafficking a top priority in recent years. But the Oakland Police Department’s sexual misconduct scandal involving several officers and an underage sex worker has raised concerns over law enforcement’s ability to effectively enforce trafficking. In the wake of this scandal at the Oakland Police Department, we’ll take a look at the state of sex trafficking in the Bay Area and talk with some local experts about the latest efforts to combat it.

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Michael Kirst

California Board of Education President Michael Kirst has worked in education policy for over 50 years. Kirst joins us in-studio to discuss his career in education, including taking the lead in crafting the state’s new education funding formula. We’ll also get his thoughts on the state’s new history and social sciences curriculum — which now includes LGBT history — and how to close the enormous academic performance gap between schools in low-income communities and those in wealthy ones.

teeth

Since 1979, the federal government has recommended flossing daily to help prevent gum disease and cavities. But according to a new report by the Associated Press,  there’s little scientific evidence to support that advice. We’ll drill down into the data, and we want to hear from you: Will the news affect your oral hygiene routine?

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The Masumoto Family

The Masumoto peach farm near Fresno has been in David Masumoto’s family since 1948, after his Japanese grandparents were released from a WWII internment camp and worked the land until they could afford to buy it. Now David is preparing to pass the farm onto the fourth generation — his daughter Nikiko — as he deals with the effects of climate change on crops and struggles to recover from triple bypass surgery. David and Nikiko join us to talk about the family’s rich agricultural legacy, and the economic and environmental challenges facing the farm — the subject of their new book and the documentary, “Changing Season.”

 

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Zika Virus

The Center for Disease Control advised pregnant women on Monday to avoid a neighborhood in Miami where 14 cases of Zika have been found. This marks the first time the CDC has ever warned against travel inside the United States. Nearly 100 people in California have been found to be carrying the Zika virus, but all were infected while traveling outside the country. Forum discusses the spread of Zika and efforts to contain it.

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Crew Team for Forum

At the cusp of the opening ceremony for the 2016 Olympics in Brazil, we’ll look back at an extraordinary victory 80 years ago. During the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games,  an American rowing team of nine young working-class men unexpectedly defeated Adolf Hitler’s elite German athletes, serving as an inspiration to a nation in the depths of the Great Depression. A new documentary on PBS’ American Experience, inspired by Daniel James Brown’s “The Boys in the Boat”, tells the story of these young men and the obstacles they had to overcome to win gold.

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Ballot Box

This November, California voters will be asked to decide on a whopping 17 initiatives — and that doesn’t even include local ballot measures. The deluge comes despite recent reforms aimed at streamlining the state’s initiative process. We’ll talk with experts about this year’s bloated ballot and whether direct democracy is working for California.

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money CROPPED

A recent study found that while 81 percent of people report they handle their finances very well, only 37 percent could pass a financial literacy quiz. The survey, from the FINRA Investor Education Foundation, looked at more than 25,000 people and found many were running up credit card fees, overdrawing from bank accounts, and had not set aside money for their children’s education. We’ll discuss the study’s findings and look at ways to improve our financial know-how.

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The chapel building at the Asilomar State Beach and Conference Grounds designed by architect Julia Morgan.

Julia Morgan may be best known as the architect who spent nearly 30 years working on Hearst Castle. But Morgan was a trailblazer — at the turn of the twentieth century, she was the first woman admitted to a renowned architecture program in Paris and she became the first woman licensed to practice architecture in California. Over the course of her career, Morgan designed and built more than 700 buildings, including rebuilding San Francisco’s Fairmont Hotel after the 1906 earthquake. We’ll explore Morgan’s legacy and look at her role as a leader in the Bay Area’s Arts and Craft movement. Tell us: what’s your favorite Julia Morgan building?

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A woman doing laundry.

When does someone truly become an adult? Is it when they graduate from high school? The first time they pay their own rent? Or maybe it’s an emotional shift that happens after the death of a loved one? We discuss what it means to be an adult and how it’s being redefined in the Bay Area, where CEOs wear hoodies and employees go to work on skateboards. We want to hear from you: When do you feel you became an adult … or are you not there yet?