David Cay Johnston poses for a portrait.

In “It’s Even Worse Than You Think” David Cay Johnston chronicles the unprecedented actions — many covert — that President Trump has taken to upend the structures of American government. Johnston argues that the administration’s attempts to alter federal policies, from immigration to education, threaten modern democracy. Johnston joins us to discuss the potential long-term effects of Trump’s presidency.

David Cay Johnston: Donald Trump is Dismantling Democracy 14 February,2018Michael Krasny

Guests:
David Cay Johnston, author, “It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What the Trump Administration Is Doing to America”; tax professor, Syracuse University College of Law

  • Curious

    Hysterical, ignorant leftie.

    • BioMeister

      Curious is a Serial Troll – here to disrupt. Best to ignore him.

      • Noelle

        Johnston has investigated DJT for over 30 years so we should listen to what he’s talking about, instead of calling him hysterical.

        • BioMeister

          Noelle – It’s your choice, of course, but engaging “Curious” in any way whatsoever only plays into his intention to disrupt and deflect intelligent discussion. Completely ignoring the content of his posts, no matter how intentionally provocative, is ultimately the only way to keep him from ruining these conversations.

        • Vern

          So he is a stalker. You’re going to trust such a person?

      • jamiebronson

        Yeah, he posted a comment even before the show began. He must have had some other site/show to troll over this one.

  • Another Mike

    If I could ask a tax question:

    Now that our corporate tax rate has been cut, will this have, first, any effect on corporate efforts to shift revenue to still lower tax countries, or second, any effect on corporate efforts to shift jobs overseas? If neither, will it have any positive effects at all?

  • EIDALM

    Totally agree with the guest, the Trump presidency could be the worst nightmare that have ever faced this country, it is like having the creature from the black lagoon setting in the White house it truly bringing in the dark ages back in our time, while shifting trillions of dollars to himself and his paymasters billionaires, the goons of the Wall Street, multinational corporations, and foreign interests, while robing the poor from their meager subsidies and basic life necessities, destroying what ever little left of the once was the great American middle class before Reagan, destroying all rules and regulations that protected our environment, consumer protection guards, education, sending millions of Americans to their early death from lack of health care, totally misguided and dangerous foreign policies, bringing back and promoting racial hatred and divisions after decades of reconsideration and harmony, adding trillions of dollars to our national debt. even the conservative Heritage Institute in recent article stated that Trump and the Republicans are bankrupting America.

  • Skip Conrad

    I would think the election of Donal Trump is a vindication of our modern democracy. A statement that our democracy may be finally working. I thought many of Obama’s actions threatened democracy. As far as education, the federal government doesn’t run education in this country. It does in France. The control of education is held locally, with the states, and with private enterprise. Every since Daniel Webster argued before the Supreme Court and won the Dartmouth College case, education in America has been all about free enterprise.
    As far as immigration, Obama did very little to enforce our laws. This again became a role of the federal government after Trump was elected. We’ll see how the Supreme Court rules about the matter this Friday, February 16.

    As a side note, I don’t believe our form of government is democratic. Consider the great democracies on the planet: The Democratic Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of Somalia, the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, the Democratic Republic of Korea. Frankly, I’d rather not be a democracy.

    • Noelle

      The Dept of Education does sponsor grants to schools, they pushed the Common Core(until at end of Obama admin when they conceded it was not a good policy), it doesn’t “run” education here, yes, but it doesn’t mean there is no influence.

      Our form of government has deformed into a “pay to play” system. We actually have experienced this before, during the Gilded Age, and this inspired the Progressive Era where many reforms were passed to counter the influence of the oligarchs of the day.

      • Skip Conrad

        I agree. The Feds can influence education, but not control. NCLB has been a failure. Most federal education programs fail. The Feds run the service academies, the School of the Americas, and maybe some consulate schools. That’s about it.

    • BioMeister

      Trump has done far more to threaten Democracy in any given month of his Presidency than Obama did in 8 years. I am no fan of Obama, and even less one of Hillary Clinton, but Donald Trump is dramatically worse.

      • Skip Conrad

        That might be true if you consider the USA is a actually a Democracy. The constitution is not democratic.
        You would need to innumerate the threats to democracy Trump has committed in the past 30 days. Can you do that, please?
        Obama threatened democracy, as well.

  • jakeleone

    Sounds like Godwin’s law in action.

    What about the fact that the FBI used a fake dossier, paid for by the Clinton campaign, to authorize the bugging of each and every member of the Trump transition team. As part of a strategy to trap people when they couldn’t remember every conversation and detail, when questioned by the FBI. And then to use that entrapment (now obstruction of justice) to try to get them to turn on the Trump administration.

    If that isn’t the sickest attempt at a coup of a duly elected President, What. Is. ?.

    • geraldfnord

      Yes and they developed secret time machine technology to go back in time to open that investigation before they had the Steele dossier, and their orbital mind-control lasers to hide Steele’s motivations even as they disclosed them—which they had to do, because noöne hostile to someone ever found anything actually wrong about them, and judges are incapable of theory-of-mind.

      • jakeleone

        No what they did was far more insidious they used false evidence to bypass the 4th amendment.

        You don’t need to build up some paper-tiger geraldfnord. You know full well that the bias of this phony dossier was never revealed to the court. An important fact that was withheld and led to an entrapment case against a Trump team member. But it was deeper than that, they bugged every single phone conversation, and only could come up with an entrapment case.

        That’s nothing but a big Witch hunt and you know it. It is exactly the kinds of things that occur in Banana Republics. The end does not justify the means.

        And the whole purpose of indicting Flynn was to get him to turn someone else in for some fake reason to escape a conviction. Which he never did, because there is nothing else.

  • Noelle

    Another reason for the Electoral College was to prevent unqualified people from being elected president. It’s not democratic. We have too much worship of the Constitution and are afraid to change it.

    • Vern

      Dangerous idea. You say “we” as though you know it will be changed to suit your interests. Are you a member of the .01%? If it is changed it will be to their benefit primarily.

      • Noelle

        I think many people would say parts of the Constitution are outdated and could be revised. But with how our politics are run it could be a pay to play situation as well and I can agree with you on that. No I am not part of .01%

        • Vern

          Pandora’s box.

    • Skip Conrad

      Yes, if we were a democracy, we would not have the electoral college, rather there would be direct election of the president.

    • chriswinter

      I’m not convinced we have to amend the Constitution to fix this problem. A number of states have laws which punish “faithless electors.” If those could be modified to allow for good-conscience reversal on the part of electors, I think it would go some way toward buttressing this duty of the Electoral College.

  • geraldfnord

    In some ways, I prefer those Rightists like Peter Thiel who are openly anti-democratic, believing that economic power is the only measure of fitness to govern—democracy immorally gives, in their eyes, equal weight in decision-making to Harvey Weinstein and some obviously less wise teacher or home health aide.

  • Vern

    The US elites who comprise the Establishment have earned much bad karma due to excessive importation of unneeded workers, the export of manufacturing to poor countries, and their recent attempt to dismantle democracy using the Trans Pacific Partnership. Those who accuse trump of dismantling democracy are in fact the biggest proponents replacing democracy with fascism, run by the 1%, executed by multinationals and the security apparatus.

    • Ben Rawner

      Is that why his administration has multiple billionaires whose aim is obviously privatizing the American government got the gain?

      • Noelle

        DJT’s budget is the Koch Bros. ideal

        • Vern

          Real question is, who benefits from bankrupting America?

          • Noelle

            If corporations replace workers with robots how are Americans going to have enough money to buy stuff? Borrowing from Henry Ford. Corporate overlords may be benefitting in the short term, but not in the long run, it will not end well.

      • Vern

        Because trump has a deep sycophantic need to be a part of the Establishment. He wants to be in the rich boys club. Hence the exit of the breitbart guy.

        • Ben Rawner

          That contradicts your earlier statement.

          • Vern

            Poor little Ben cannot hold two thoughts in the head at once.

          • BioMeister

            Vern, I think the thoughts in YOUR head are worse than holding NONE at all.

    • BioMeister

      Vern, tighten up your tinfoil hat and adjust your meds. Trump IS the 1%, and his Tax Bill is a gift to himself and his obscenely wealthy peers.

  • Noelle

    Does he think that after Reagan’s ending of the Fairness Doctrine we have had worse coverage of the news by the media? And then with the rise of the internet in media people can be siloed into echo chambers of what they want to hear? Can Americans still create enough of a consensus to keep our democratic institutions strong, like when the Watergate scandal led to Nixon’s resignation?

  • William – SF

    The worsening of this country by DJT and Republicans in Congress is less an anticipation of how bad things can get than a continual bracing for gut punches to our humanity.

    The core values of this country are not those being realized by the policies of DJT, his minions, Republicans in Congress, right-wing media, or their aging conspiracy minded supporters, regardless, the damage they are causing will take years to recover from.

  • Noelle

    Part of the reason democratic society is atrophying is partly due to fewer Americans being in unions. People who are in unions learned about democracy by being active in their union. But then of course there were corrupt union leaders which eroded that ideal. Since then we seem to let the professionals take over being active in the electoral process in general, and big money has also swept into the vacuum.

    • Alo Moj

      Unions were and are still demonized by corporate interests. Of course there were bad apples. But there were bad many many bad apples in corporations and politics as well.

      • Noelle

        at least unions are still supposedly democratically run. But if you’re in a corporation there is no democracy.

      • Debbie Neff McKee

        agreed…..unions protect workers….businesses do not need protection…

    • BioMeister

      Unions are basically the alt-left, and just as bad in many cases as the alt-right. I have nothing against the workers at all, but Union LEADERSHIP has in fact become part of the Left’s 1%, in cushy, entitled positions, consorting with criminals, spending union dues with both hands to maintain their power and push the Democrats too far Left to win elections. I think that Trump is the worst thing to happen to the USA since the Civil War, but it is in part the excesses of the Unions and of the Dems on their behalf that made Trump possible.

      • Alo Moj

        Emplyees have no chance against corporations without unions. There is strength in numbers.

        • BioMeister

          I agree there is a need for Unions, I just think that they are as badly broken as the Federal Government under Trump and BOTH Parties in Congress.

          • Noelle

            Yes. Maybe more people should start cooperative businesses to counter this trend. It’s not going to solve everything but at least for some workers in co-ops they can run them cooperatively and democratically.

      • marte48

        extremists on the right create extremists on the left.

        • BioMeister

          I’m not talking about extremists – extremists built the Unions, virtually by definition, and at the time Unions first rose, they were much more necessary than they are today. I am talking about political corruption and greed and criminality among Union LEADERS, which is rife.

      • marte48

        All of the advances of human rights for workers are due to the unions. If you work a 40 hour week, you are benefiting from the unions.

    • jurgispilis

      There is no incentive to deal with unions, because most businesses can bypass this, and hire docile foreign workers. Naturally, unions like SAG, BAR association, AMA, and perhaps the airlines pilots union (ALPA) have survived. Guess why.

      • BioMeister

        Where there is a profit motive, under current U.S. Labor Laws, management and labor will either reach an equitable agreement, whether there are Unions or not, or, if they don’t, management will pick up and move the business to another State or another country. If workers demand too much, capital is mobile, unlike the situation at the birth of the Labor Movement. And if employers offer too little, LABOR is also mobile, and employers will not be able to maintain any continuity in their workforce.

        Where there is NO profit motive and little or no effective management, Unions thrive in spite of any real need for them. This is why the strength of Unions today is not in the private sector, it is in Teacher’s and Government Employees, where they strive to minimize any sort of consequences connected with performance, grow employment regardless of need, and bankroll Democrats who will let them keep their cushy jobs. (EDIT: I mean the LEADERS’ cushy jobs; some public-sector employees are hard-working and dedicated, but the Unions protect the ones who aren’t, too)

  • William – SF

    The motivations for the policies of this administration are less a mystery than the unrelenting support of DJT’s supporters who aren’t at all benefiting from DJT’s redistribution of America’s assets.

    So, short of the dissolution of two marriages and the wedding announcement of DJT and Nancy Pelosi (or Chuck Schumer), what would it take for the majority of DJT supporters to change their allegiances?

  • Pontifikate

    You say people are not involved civically. To what extent do you believe this is because of long work hours, long commutes. If not those reasons, why, and what can we do to change it?

    • Noelle

      Good point.

    • Vern

      The hysteria on TV 📺 from the fake news like fox cnn msnbc, might discourage many people.

      • BioMeister

        The mainstream media is far from perfect, but they’re a lot closer than Fox or Breitbart. Trump Trolls’ calls of “Fake News” are the ultimate case of people in glass houses throwing stones.

  • Alo Moj

    Sadly, I don’t know if the US will ever recover from Trump.

    • Vern

      Then please leave. Emigrate to Sweden.

    • Curious

      I never thought we would recover from Barry, but Trump has turned the country around and we are headed in the right direction.

      • BioMeister

        Curious is a serial troll here – it only disrupts intelligent conversation to engage him at all.

        • jakeleone

          The term “Troll” is sometimes used racially as a way to nazify those who we disagree with.

          • BioMeister

            I have no idea what race “Curious” is, but his non-contributions here over a period of at least many months definitely qualify him as a Troll. His dismissive “Barry” in reference to Obama is only the tip of this grungy iceberg.

          • jakeleone

            You know why we have the Fox (conservative) and CNN (liberal) divide. Because people can’t stand the gestalt wrought by some. We have special terms for those kinds of people who annoy us, example “Troll” is commonly used. But really what you are doing is putting your mind into a stasis box (Star Trek reference). You have to take the statement and disprove it, otherwise just let it stand and write your opinion in a new one.

            All the time people critique my statements, if there is nothing I can (or want to refute), just let them be, no need to create a partition.

          • BioMeister

            Again I will say, look back at his history here. I’m happy to debate opposing points of view. Curious is a Troll, here solely to provoke people and disrupt the conversation. I’m happy with the justification for the label.

            Also, let’s remember that the Right loves their derogatory labels, starting with the despicable Donald Trump with “Fake News” and a demeaning, typically unjustified adjective for anyone he doesn’t like at any given moment. So Senile Donny and his Moronic Minions, I will say, deserve all the schoolyard insults they have earned in the past few years,

          • BioMeister

            Also, I disagree with your apparently placing Fox and CNN at some sort of equivalency. I’ll grant CNN is left-leaning, but Fox is virtually the propaganda arm of the Trump WH, completely laughable as a serious news organization. They were bad enough before, but since they learned that they have a virtual direct line to Trump’s limited intellectual equipment through his constant TV watching, they have formed a mutual-admiration society. Playing that sort of favoritism with a particular media company is another move in the direction of the destruction of democracy.

    • jakeleone

      The economy will. But apparently Democrats won’t, but for some illnesses you have to want to recover first.

  • Ben Rawner

    As more and the more officials resign, will it even be possible to remove Trump from office?

    • BioMeister

      WH employees take an oath to the Constitution, not the President. The problem is ever getting enough people who really adhere to that in the White House at any given time, which seems unlikely in Trump’s Cult of Personality.

    • Curious

      For what??? Because you don’t like him? No.

  • marte48

    Thanks, Mr. Johnston, for your good work, and thanks to Michael for having him on Forum. I have been aware of David Cay Johnston since his book, “Perfectly Legal.”

  • Judy Zakrajsheck Reeves

    If every presidential candidate would be required to undergo a security clearance, I don’t believe our country would be in this mess today. Trump would not be given a green light.

    • Curious

      We would have been spared the 8 disastrous years of the Obama regime.

      • BioMeister

        Curious is just a serial troll and nothing more. Engaging with him only disrupts the discussion, which is what he is here to do.

      • marte48

        Donald Trump made a fool of himself by accusing Obama of not being born in the USA. Try to pay attention.

        • Curious

          That was after Hillary alleged it.

      • marte48

        Obama inherited the disasters – wars and economic crash – created by the Bush administration.

        • Curious

          Created by Clinton.

      • marte48

        Trump inherited a much-improved economy from Obama.

        • Curious

          False.

    • chriswinter

      That’s for sure. Also, if every president, as Commander in Chief, were subject to the same approval process as the military service members in the missile silos, Trump would have been rejected as mentally unfit. This is a recommendation from The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump.

  • Curious

    Johnston, not satisfied with making an absolute fool of himself with the Trump tax return nothingburger, is back trying to sell his latest book of fiction.

    • BioMeister

      Curious is a serial troll and nothing more. Engaging with him only disrupts the discussion, which is what he is here to do.

    • marte48

      curious fool.

  • Debbie Neff McKee

    I told everyone in early 2016 that Donald would win because he is the best snake oil salesman I had ever seen…
    Michael Moore also stated the same in the summer of 2016 and was almost booed off the Bill Maher program…

  • jdoubleu

    Why hang-up on the caller about Oprah? He had an excellent point: Oprah is one of the most “trusted” people in the U.S. If she’s propping-up people who lie or make-up “fake” news/information, it is important. Shame on you for hanging-up on him mid-sentence.

    • Olivia

      He was off topic. We’re talking about Trump, not Oprah. Also this is live, he can’t let callers take over.

  • Debbie Neff McKee

    Thank you David…read all your books…always on point and correct…very enlightening and educational…

  • Olivia

    Trump is president because our election process has been rigged by BOTH parties, and our media outlets are owned by corrupt, power obsessed white men that decide what points of views and information gets out there. Let’s face it, if the nation actually listened to NPR rather than Fox news and other such biased networks, our government would look VERY different, and Trump would have never made it through the primaries because people would have known the FACTS!!

    • marte48

      even NPR was reluctant to cover Bernie Sanders.

    • Curious

      NPR and the MSM are part of the DNC.

      • Sanford Sklansky

        I am guessing there are a lot of conservatives that listen to NPR

        • Curious

          We are paying for it so why not?

  • Mark Bouquet

    That’s narcolepsy, not sleep apnea, that causes one to involuntarily fall asleep.

    • marte48

      True, sleep apnea is akin to snoring – it interrupts breathing, and thus causes one to waken.

      • Noelle

        and to not get enough sleep at night, thus many train operators nod off when they are conducting the train and it crashes.

  • InabaML

    Thank you, thank you, thank you. Trump is the fever, not the disease. We have morphed from being citizens, to consumers, to spectators needing to be entertained constantly by media. We are a Celebrity Culture. Trump has always been willing to state exactly who he is. We choose to ignore the fact that his agenda is to always act from self-interest, risk and spend “other people’s money”, promote and insure the wealth and position of his own family. Your guest is right. Trump’s pathology insures that his decisions will be self-serving, grandiose, and based in dishonesty.

    • Noelle

      Some people like being conned, or else they want to hear what they want to hear. Johnston is saying the emperor has no clothes.

  • marte48

    as for the corporate taxes, what is to stop other countries from lowering theirs?

    • William – SF

      And one only need look to …the U.S. to see States competing for business by lowering their corporate tax rates. It’s a fool’s game to think there is a bottom to a corporate tax rate that could not be had by any country. By passing their tax plan, DJT and Republicans in Congress simply handed free money to wealthy corporations and gave the country the bill.

  • BDN

    I just hear Michael use the term “op·pro·bri·ous”, which you can tell I had to look up — what is the difference between opprobrious and egreggious?

    • marte48

      “I just hear” is not correct syntax.

      • BDN

        it’s called a typo

        • BioMeister

          Opprobrious is an adjective meaning EXPRESSING criticism or scorn of something. Egregious is also an adjective basically meaning “extremely bad.” Used in a sentence:

          “A single-letter typo in a posted comment is not egregious, and therefore not deserving of an opprobrious response.”

          • jakeleone

            That’s what I love about Forum.

          • BDN

            yes. exsellent!

          • BioMeister

            Well playd.

    • BDN

      i don’t think Michael’s gonna chime in here but i betcha the difference is noun vs adjective, and cuz i prolly heard him say “op·pro·bri·um” and not “op·pro·bri·ous”, that and the fact that there’s no part of speech or noun called “e·gre·gium”. Anybody?

  • Olivia

    I love this caller!! I love that he brought up gerrymandering!!!

  • Debbie Neff McKee

    Just saw this for the de Young exhibit…..

    Casanova: The Seduction of Europe

    Through May 28 | Legion of Honor

    “The man of the world is wholly his mask. What he is, is nothing. What he appears to be, is everything.” —Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  • Noelle

    Politicians don’t want voters to know history. Especially when they want to lead us into war. Lots of parallels with the run up to the Iraq invasion when I hear the politicians talking about N. Korea threat. This administration reminds me a lot about what happened in the Reagan Admin.

  • Annie Smart

    This is driving me crazy. Every single thing discussed was predicted, perfectly intelligently, by those who follow this stuff seriously. BEFORE Trump was elected. We KNOW current republicans equate any kind of restrictive legislation and social support systems as “Socialism”. The dragon that must be slayed. What is SO annoying has been the inability of the press etc to articulate this clear situation to voters. THAT is the problem.

    • Noelle

      Maybe a symptom of the repeal of the Fairness Doctrine under Reagan. But with all these internet media outlets there are so many cacophonous voices now. Koch Bros. like this chaos to implement their plans through politicians like Paul Ryan.

      • Annie Smart

        Could not agree more. These crooks are past-masters at distraction and disruption and many editors still chase the shiny balls they fling up. I do wish they would be more focused and responsible and hold on to the longer story.

        • BioMeister

          I agree, and I feel the mainstream media is STILL handling Trump with kid gloves. They politely point out contradictory evidence or suggest impropriety timidly in the face of the most outrageous lies and the most egregious attempts to obstruct justice, not to mention Trump’s clear racism and misogyny. They need to treat this 3rd-rate tabloid celebrity as such, and keep doing it until his behavior changes or we are rid of him.

  • jakeleone

    The guest today is so biased most of the innuendo presented is political bias. The country duly elected Trump but liberals can’t get over it (Republican or Democratic liberals). The fake dossier on Trump is an example the waste and damage such hysteria can cause.

    What about the complete loss of 4th amendment protection that was caused when Comey and FBI used a Phone Dossier prepared by the Hillary campaign to obtain a FISA warrant to bug every single telephone conversation coming out of Trump tower and the transition team?

    I mean what about that? Can we please talk about that? Can we please realize how aweful this whole episode is?

    Democrats need to stop whining and start developing a better economic strategy.

    Look to the past for some inspiration people, the internet was a government program that has had great economic success.

    We can do the same in other areas:

    – We can develop better servant robotics, as a prelude to getting samples back from Mars (proving that it is safe to send and return people from Mars).
    – We can develop and organ replacement industry, that maybe grows organs artificially.

    “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.”

    Get it together Democrats stop whining!

    • BioMeister

      I generally agree, but I’d agree more if you substituted “George W. Bush” for “Donald Trump.” Bush was a political defeat and a setback for Democratic party principles in general. He was also dangerous in some ways. Despite his many flaws, the Dems failed to beat him the first time or to deny him reelection. (And please no cries of “Florida!” “Florida!” Bush vs. Gore in Florida was a statistical tie, and a partisan Republican majority in the Supreme Court handed it to Bush on purely political grounds. But let’s be honest, if there had been a DEMOCRATIC majority, they would have handed it to GORE on purely political grounds.)

      Trump, on the other hand, is such a clear and present danger to life, liberty, prosperity, and democracy that he demands a degree of resistance out of all proportion to conventional partisan politics. He is the worst thing to happen to America since the Civil War, and if we can possibly reduce his power through the 2018 Elections, Impeachment, the 25th Amendment, etc., we surely must strive to do so. And of course a Trump reelection in 2020 would be a total catastrophe. I didn’t like “W” much, but unlike Trump, he was not an existential threat to all living things everywhere.

      • Kurt thialfad

        “Trump … is such a clear and present danger to life, liberty, prosperity, and democracy”. I could not disagree with you more.

        • BioMeister

          Trump is a childish, thin-skinned, vindictive, ignorant, narcissistic, demented buffoon with his finger on the nuclear trigger. Trading public insults with the nuclear-armed leader of the most unstable, unpredictable regime on Earth? Or I don’t know, maybe North Korea is the SECOND MOST unstable, unpredictable regime on Earth since Jan. 2018. Disagree all you want — Trump is an existential danger.

    • Kurt thialfad

      That’s right. Trump Tower was bugged. Trumps did not lie about that.

      • Sanford Sklansky

        It was not bugged to listen in on Trump

  • Sanford Sklansky

    I have listened to a bunch of interviews with David since he is out selling his book. So I have pretty much heard the same questions asked. It is hard to come up with new stuff. I did read the Making of Donald Trump. It was an excellent book. Every one should read it even if you are not a Trump voter. I don’t know if it makes a difference if he hasn’t been on the Sunday shows or not. Not one big paper has written about what he has had to say about Trump. I would love to see him on Hannity. He would give him a beat down. He has been on Lawrence O’Donnell but with 2 other people. Not enough time to say any thing. He has been on Democracy Now where he gets more time to talk. I am guessing that the few people who complained about him in this interview have not read one thing he has written

  • jake3_14

    For a guy so well-informed and articulate, Johnston sure is naive about what this country actually stands for. Ever since the end of WWII, the U.S.A. has been about projecting American influence abroad (Read “In the Shadow of the American Empire,” “The Brothers,” and “The Devil’s Chessboard) and and promoting oligarchy at home. The latter was cemented in the 1976 SCOTUS ruling of Buckley v. Valeo, which declared money equivalent to speech, which led directly to the Citizens United decision, two generations later. America can never be the kind of place Johnston claims it could be; it’s actions on the world stage as a leading and moral force has been tarnished and actively trashed by this country’s wealthy and the politicians they’ve bought.

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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