A United Airlines plane takes off from San Francisco International Airport on June 10, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

An Aeromexico plane almost landed on a runway occupied by another commercial jet at San Francisco International Airport last week, marking the third close call at the airport in the past six months. And in response to two incidents at SFO last year, Air Canada has begun a comprehensive safety review of all operations. We’ll discuss recent incidents and passenger safety at the airport.

Related links:

FAA Investigates Another Near Miss at SFO, Air Canada Launches Review 18 January,2018Michael Krasny

Guests:
Patrick Smith, airline pilot, host of www.askthepilot.com
Matthias Gafni, investigative reporter, East Bay Times and The Mercury News

  • Robert Thomas

    Since when have journalists with little or no understanding of technical issues been able to resist “running around with hair on fire” wherever there’s opportunity to engender public outrage?

    • fefi fofum

      We must do more to prevent FATAL CRASHES, like the recent one at SFO runway that KILLED MANY! And was not even Mentioned in the KQED forum show!

      sir, don’t try to hide it behind “it’s too technical for the public to understand” next to highly educated Silicon Valley.
      Head in the sand is Not a popular position, at least in this State on the coast.

      • Robert Thomas

        Unlike hypocritical, anonymous posters here, I hide nothing behind anything.

        Since scheduled flights commenced in 1934, SFO has suffered these fatalities on its grounds:

        February 20, 1959; a Pan American DC-7C crashed and burned on the runway. The three crew members on board survived.
        February 3, 1963; Slick Airways Flight 40, a Lockheed L-1049H Super Constellation, crashed and burned after striking approach lights on runway 28R, killing the four people on board.
        July 6, 2013; Asiana Airlines Flight 214, a Boeing 777-200ER, crashed while landing. The crash occurred due to mistakes made by the aircraft’s flight crew, which had selected an incorrect autopilot mode when attempting to descend, followed by placing the thrust levers into “idle” which disabled the autopilot from maintaining speed as the aircraft approached the seawall. There were three fatalities.

        I assume the latter three terrible deaths constitute the “MANY KILLED” to which you hysterically refer.

        I’m neither a pilot nor a civil engineer but I have had a successful forty-year electrical engineering career in Santa Clara Valley and I’ve learned to value the opinions of experienced workers in other technical professions – such as those here of Captain Smith (whose blog “Ask the Pilot” was described as “always excellent” by James Fallows of The Atlantic Monthly) – more than I do the opinions of poorly informed, poorly educated crusading reporters.

  • jdoubleu

    When the economy collapsed in 2008-2009, SFO and SF stopped their analysis to move SFO’s parallel runways further into the Bay. The lack of distance between the 4 parallel runways (which cross in the middle) is why SFO continues to have ATC delays in fog…. (SF/SFO could have bought other land along the Bay and created an equal amount of “new” Bay in exchange for any new landfill.) SFO’s poor runway config impacts on-time performance across the West Coast. (Flights from Europe, Asia, Hawai’i, etc., are given priority for landing in bad weather.) It was only “luck” the UA captain saw and notified Air Canada — and prevented that disaster. How much longer do we rely on luck?

    • fefi fofum

      I totally agree.
      The NTSB seems to mainly,,, wait for Fatal Disasters, GAG any News, and public publish way too late!
      We Must be More Proactive!

      Both pilots were just “apologists” for the Airlines and the way things are,,, Getting Worse!
      That is,,, TOTALLY UNSATISFACTORY!

  • niek vroom

    We must do more to prevent FATAL CRASHES, like the recent one at SFO runway that KILLED MANY! And was not even Mentioned in the KQED forum show!sir, don’t try to hide it behind “it’s too technical for the public to understand” next to highly educated Silicon Valley. Head in the sand is Not a popular position, at least in this State on the coast

  • galacticmenchi

    When the economy collapsed in 2008-2009, SFO and SF stopped their analysis to move SFO’s parallel runways further into the Bay. The lack of distance between the 4 parallel runways (which cross in the middle) is why SFO continues to have ATC delays in fog…. (SF/SFO could have bought other land along the Bay and created an equal amount of “new” Bay in exchange for any new landfill

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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