Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during the final night of the Republican National Convention at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, July 21, 2016.

Forum provides analysis on the latest political news, including an update on the immigration debate, the status of federal budget negotiations and a look at continued fallout from President Trump’s disparaging comments about Haiti and African nations.

Monday Morning Political Roundup 15 January,2018Michael Krasny

Guests:
Scott Detrow, political reporter. NPR
James Taylor, professor of political science and director of African American studies, University of San Francisco
Harmeet Dhillon, national committeewoman for California, Republican National Committee; former vice-chair, California Republican Party

  • jakeleone

    If you come to the U.S. for economic reasons, you should be admitted on a merit system.

    If you come to the U.S. for family, refugee, or because we do need a diverse population, then the merit system need not be rigidly applied or applied at all.

    Business guys, like Trump, like the merit system because it will help them get more workers, and while that make us rich, we might lose our hearts in the process.

    • geraldfnord

      0.) Thank-you for making distinctions.
      1.) Thank-you for noting the Orwellian character of ‘chain migration’—I would hold that its usage is particularly intended to make the process sound as if it were something new, when it in fact has been a or even the main mode of economic migration because it makes sense—until 1914, up to half the initial male immigrants from Italy and the Germanies decided that things weren’t working-out well enough in the U.S. to bring their families, or had sent enough money home to build an house or a sister’s dowry, or were no longer subject to arrest or vendetta, or were now above the age of conscription, and returned home. (In a couple of those cases, they were technically what we’d now call ‘illegal immigrants’ as they had had to lie about having committed a crime in the home country.) (Jews had much lower return rates because government-encouraged lynch-mobs always potentially a day away were waiting back home—as Russia failed to make early capitalism work for anybody much, hatred of ‘not-us’ became a vital part of the upper classes’, aristocrats’, and royalty’s security proposition.)
      2.) Your appeal to ‘the heart’ is subject to the mockery of a notable component of the populace who’ve been taught to view ’empathy’ as a snarl-word—Real Men don’t even feel their own feelings (modulo anger, lust, triumph, hatred, and sullen resentment).

      • Noelle

        Yes, my great great grandparents came to Marysville, CA in the 1860s. My gr-gr grandfather started a clothing store, and the other merchants in the town let their relatives in what was Posen province of Prussia know this was a good place to settle. My gr gr grandmother and her sisters came and married the other merchants in the town and who became successful in this country. This is chain migration and it’s not a dirty word to me.

        • geraldfnord

          Unfortunately, circumstances alter cases—’moron’ and ‘retarded’ used to be fairly neutral, technical, terms, and there are old synagogues with swastika decorations.

    • Curious

      Every civilized country in the world restricts immigration to merit based. So should we.

      • Noelle

        Canada.

      • bear_in_mind

        Do you have a list of “every civilized country”?

      • jakeleone

        I don’t have any issue with some (even if that winds up to be 80% at times for lack of persecution and war) of the immigration being merit based. We don’t really have that now. The Green Card process is filled with loopholes that basically allow anyone to get in. The H-1b visa, rarely results in a Green Card. And Green Card holders themselves don’t make any pledge to become citizens.

        So my question is, yes to merit based immigration, as part of an overall immigration strategy that includes, refugees, family members, and people who are being perscecuted in their homeland.

        And a bigger question, when is the U.S. going to actually have “Merit” based immigration as part of our overall immigration strategy. I mean we don’t really have it now. Yes you can get a visa, but you are under no obligation to seek a Green Card or citizenship.

        I want more fully franchised citizens. I can’t stand the fact that there is a population in the United States (about 10 million) that is afraid to go to the local police, because they are not fully franchised. That just leads to contempt and disrespect for our country and our laws.

        Every country has an immigration system, not all are merit based. Even if all were merit based, we could still have a heterogenous mix of factors in our system, we don’t have to copy everyone else. Let feel free to think and consider what might work best for U.S.

      • dj

        That is not what has happened recently in Germany and some of the other EU countries. Given all the turmoil and security problems, we can debate about whether it has been a good thing or not. But the facts are there.

        • Curious

          Germany admitted refugees. It is not the standard policy. And the cost of that mistake is there for everyone to see.

    • bear_in_mind

      If this was such a grand idea, why did the country wait 240 years to consider adopting it?

    • dj

      The topic of merit-based immigration obscures some of what goes on in our economy. For example, Mr. Trump apparently used undocumented migrants as construction workers for a project in New York (perhaps more than one). He was fined for not providing them with rudimentary safety equipment, like hard hats.

      He also apparently uses Haitian immigrants as workers at Mar-A-Lago.

      When I lived in Houston, the estimate I heard was that about fifty percent of construction workers were undocumented Mexicans. Where demand outstrips supply, there will be inward migration to fill the need.

      The incentive here is fairly clear: use workers who will accept low wages, regardless of the legality of their immigration status. We can conceive of a merit-based argument here – there is a demand for these workers because of what they contribute to Mr. Trump’s bottom line. But that is not what the Republicans mean by merit-based immigration.

      • Curious

        “Where demand outstrips supply, there will be inward migration to fill the need.”

        No. Supply is there at a higher wage. Illegals depress wages. Employers get cheaper labor. Tax payers get stuck with the bill.

  • Skip Conrad

    Whether or not a country be a shithole, we certainly don’t want to accept folks from countries who will not accept back their deportees. These countries would be put on an excluded list (like Qatar, Yemen, Somalia, Iraq, etc.), until an extradition treaty is negotiated.
    Every non-citizen is subject to deportation, including DACA recipients, including LPR’s (e.g. John Lennon), including H1-B visas holders. They all know that when they enter the US, whether legally or without inspection. It comes with the territory.

    Some will say California is a shithole (everybody uses the term – as it fly so smoothly off the tongue). Certainly, Montecito is. They’re digging out from tons and tons of it.

    • geraldfnord

      Is one of your points true, that is that every non-citizen were subject to deportation? I had thought not, that legal residents, those claiming refuge whose cases had not yet been adjudicated, people whose deportation hearings were still in process, supposèd ‘non-citizens’ who are citizens who just looked too furrin’ and didn’t have papers on them, and the like, could be subject to deportation for cause. If that’s the case, then it were as true to say that they were subject to deportation as to note that I were subject to fines for speeding. (…omitting ‘if I ever drove, and exceeded the posted speed-limit.’.)

      • Skip Conrad

        True, any non-citizen could be subject to deportation for cause. A natural born citizen would never be subject to deportation for any cause. And a valid visa, or TPS, or any legal status by the government could be cancelled at any time for any reason.

  • Noelle

    Is this really news anymore(Trump comment)? He has a long history of racism, like when he put out full page ads railing against the Central Park 5, who were later exonerated. (see the ken burns documentary for more) We really need to move on from this pattern of outrage and learn to fight the man’s policies, organize voters, prevent voter suppression, you know, the usual political process. Instead we keep complaining, clutching pearl necklaces, wasting energy on this.

    • Curious

      Barry said the same thing about Libya. Where was the outrage?

      • Noelle

        he called it a s%^^* country?

        • Curious

          A sh**show.

  • pm05

    Who IS this woman!!! Trump “didn’t say it”; “Trump’s word were UNFORTUNATE”!!!
    She is HORRIBLE!

    • Curious

      Heaven forbid you should hear different thoughts!

    • geraldfnord

      Have some compassion: she’s making her way as best she can, living by advancing the interests of people whose interests she believes, delusorily, or not, jibe with hers, saying things she likely believes to be true. The same could likely be said of me, and though I believe myself to be smarter and clearer-eyed than she, and a better heir to thousands of years of ethics and observation, and less prone to mistaking beliefs for facts and passion for an argument….

    • KRAFFT

      I came here to find out who she is due to her shockingly conservative bigotry about the realities of immigrants and refugees. Sounds like she has a bee in her bonnet about which immigrants she believes should be allowed to live in the US, for example she favours her Indian brethren “who have been waiting patiently for 10 years” rather than those from just across the southern US border.

      • bear_in_mind

        As she mentioned, her father was a medical doctor. She was raised in the privileged upper class before immigrating and wants to hoard all the benefits for her extended family and people like her. It’s class warfare, pure and simple.

        • Noelle

          it’s the Republican way.

  • Curious

    The MSM did not explode with outrage when Barry said the same thing about Libya.

  • Curious

    Harmeet Dhillon is a voice of reason and a brilliant lawyer.

  • geraldfnord

    Norman Lear brought Till [sic]Death Do Us Part‘s ‘ Alfie Garnett’ as All in the Family‘s ‘Archie Bunker’ and was kind of shocked when some people loved him. Some of that was Lear et al’s three-dimensional characterisation’s and Carol O’Connor’s good acting’s spiting Bunker’s crude bigotry and mindless truculence, but I would hold that much of it was loving the character for those qualities.

    I sometimes find myself in formal agreement with Steve Bannon, in that I, too, feel that we have nurtured savages in our midst hostile to the best American values and deleterious to the best American goals—’formal’, because I’m pretty sure we have different people in mind.

    • Noelle

      yep, DJT reminds me a lot of Archie.

      • Skip Conrad

        True, he is Archie. Same Queens accent. Same appeal to the common man. Archie is the common man with all his prejudices and his faults, and his life mistakes. You are touching on the secret to Trumps success, as a politician.

        • Noelle

          Sadly, yes.

  • geraldfnord

    What the Republican spokesperson derides would, in fact, go a long way toward raising our nation to the level of, well, Norway.

    • Curious

      Higher taxes? Everyone pays taxes . Border control? Immigration control? I agree.

    • bear_in_mind

      Yes, but Norway citizens have a robust welfare state with universal health care that they pay for with TAXES — something the robber barons and their lackeys would never allow to currently allow to happen today.

      • geraldfnord

        It’s our fault for not making them scared enough of the rest of us.

      • Curious

        Dems want “free stuff.” they won’t pay taxes.

        • bear_in_mind

          That’s hilarious! The predominantly Democratic states pay FAR more in taxes (net contributor) than the predominantly Republican states. But I know our president and his acolytes cling to their ‘alternative facts’.

          • Curious

            California is the nation’s welfare queen. One eighth the nation’s population, one third of welfare recipients.

  • David Yuan

    Harmeet Dhillon talks about American values and how President Trump has done more than President Obama to support African Americans. I’d like to point out that language matters, and President Trump, who speaks so dismissively and disrespectfully of those who are not white, cannot be viewed as supporting African Americans nor are his words and views consistent with the shared values we have as Americans.

    • Curious

      Wrong.

  • pm05

    again, how horrible this woman is!!!

    • Noelle

      sometimes we have to hear what the people outside our bubble talk about.

      • bear_in_mind

        She’s citing RW talking points. You can find these on any Fox newscast 24/7.

        • Noelle

          A lot of us try to avoid those. But Drumpf in his tweets reiterates Fox & Friends talking points for us.

        • Curious

          NPR is National Propaganda Radio for the left – paid for with my tax dollars.

          • bear_in_mind

            Really? Then I suppose that would make you a right-wing troll?

          • dj

            I am looking backwards through these comments, so unfortunately mine are reverse-chronological. But I see your words as simple name calling, and off-topic as well.

          • pastramiboy

            maybe you shouldn’t be listening if it’s so offensive.

          • Curious

            Maybe I should not have to pay for it.

      • KRAFFT

        Agreed, but her opinions are clearly biased against immigrants and refugees which somewhat limits her ability to be fair.

      • dj

        I agree. But I would have liked to see a more coherent response from the other side. There was one caller who identified himself as a white man who had worked on Reagan’s campaign. He traced a history of the path of the Republicans since that time. But Michael Krasny cut him off in the middle of his statement. And there was the distracting discussion of the Hawaiian alert, right before callers weighed in. Overall, a disappointing show.

  • Skip Conrad

    Yes, Harmeet Dhillon, the DACA parents (i.e DAPA) have committed crimes – kidnapping, human smuggling, violations of the Mann Act, visa overstaying, crossing international border with out inspection. Why aren’t they being punished? Good poinrt Harmy!

    • geraldfnord

      By all means, do.

      Of course, it would be savage to ‘punish’ without drawing-up charges, indicting, trying their cases, and obtaining their convictions. One at a time, with appeals. Let them speak to judges or juries of what they fled, why they fled, and why they wanted their children with them. Some of them judged guilty will be convicted; others might meet judges or juries who see necessity as a defence valid in their cases or who’ve seen the exhortations I’ve read in gun-loving domains (among others) not to convict persons guilty of things they think shouldn’t be crimes.

      Best yet, schedule their trials after those of persons who’ve prima facie done worse….

  • Alex

    The press is doing the nation a huge disservice by focusing so much on the sh**hole comment. It’s clear by now that trump is practicing a deliberate strategy of outrage and distraction, and NPR is falling for it hook, line, and sinker.

    • Noelle

      meanwhile, the horrid legislation can be passed while the liberal outrage is ennunciated, diverting energies from efforts to counter that.

    • bear_in_mind

      This is exactly correct! Professor George Lakoff is doing great work on this to help people steer away from reinforcing the distractions and linguistic frames he uses. He’s a great follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GeorgeLakoff

      • Alex

        I’ve been a big fan of Lakoff’s ever since I read Metaphors We Live By. Unfortunately I don’t use twitter; the noise was too much for me. I read a recent piece of his on Medium though.

        Hopefully someone will convince him to get on Google+. It’s great *because* hardly anyone uses it.

        • bear_in_mind

          You can simply bookmark the URL and check it as you see fit. No need for a Twitter account.

    • dj

      Mr. Trump shoots from the hip without much thought. The only thing which strikes me as pre-planned is the two senators (Cotton and the other one), who changed their stories a day or so later.

    • dj

      It seems more like something that shot out of his mouth without much preceding thought, Alex. Considering that he said this thing in the Oval Office while conducting the people’s business, it reflects on us as a people and how we think of the rest of the world. The response of Republicans present (“I don’t recall him saying that” becomes “He did not say that” and “Durbin has a long history of making deceptive statements”) draw attention to how they feel about the role of honesty in creating national policy and foreign relations. Already the comment has had effects on our reputation in the rest of the world.

      • Curious

        Barry said the same thing about Libya. Were you outraged?

  • Sanfordia113

    As someone who has worked legally in 6 countries, I know what it is like to wait 6 hours in line at a US Embassy at below-zero temps just to get a meeting with Embassy staff. I know what it’s like to pay thousands of dollars to immigrate legally. The dreamers are a sympathetic bunch, but their parents are criminals. No DACA fix unless it involves a financial penalty of at least $50,000.

  • Curious

    I am not a Trump supporter, but he has achieved a lot more in one year than Barry achieved in 8, despite being opposed at every step.

    • bear_in_mind

      You’re correct! He’s driven more of our allies fleeing than ever before, and driven Syria, China and North Korea into Russias awaiting arms. Bravo, Drumpf!!!

      • Curious

        Uh, Barry screwed up Libya, Iran, Iraq, North Korea and Russia. Barry screwed the economy. Trump is turning things around.

      • Curious

        BTW, you lefties and your name calling are so cute! Very impressive!

    • Noelle

      Trump has Republicans in both houses of congress, that helps.

      • Curious

        They oppose him at every step. Barry had both houses and a slavish MSM.

        • Noelle

          Until the 1st midterm elections.

        • bear_in_mind

          Slavish MSM? Are you referring to the Ministry of Propaganda (aka “Fox News”)?

  • bear_in_mind

    Harmeet Dhillon opens with a four minute monologue of right-wing talking points to blame immigrants for the condition of highways and infrastructure, schools, government… you name it! This is Class Warfare 101. All the world’s ills are due to immigrants in her eyes — unless you come from a Brahmin-class family (like she admitted she did). No wonder she supports Trump!

    • Tom Scott

      Exactly.

    • Noelle

      Democrats should not assume all immigrants who become citizens will join their party. They need to earn that.

      • Curious

        Free stuff helps.

        • bear_in_mind

          Right. Immigrants *never* spend money in the United States, nor pay into Social Security, Medicare, taxes of any sort… (rolling eyes)

          • Curious

            They take many times more than they give.

          • dj

            That doesn’t seem to be the case. Check out a “This American Life” broadcast concerning the chicken processing plants in northern Georgia. Economists evaluating the overall lifetime effect on the US social support systems found the migrant workers to be a much lower burden than uneducated/blue collar whites.

            The other aspect, which unfortunately did not get covered in this broadcast, is that the migrants from the south provide labor that nobody else in this country wants to do – cut up chickens, pick crops, etc. The farmers in the Central Valley are having a hard time finding labor when their fruit is ready to harvest, and it may actually change the type of produce that they grow – mechanical harvesting equipment is not suitable for some types of fruits and nuts.

          • Curious

            Myriad studies prove illegals are a net cost. And common sense confirms. No one earning less than minimum wage can support a family of five and contribute over and above to the economy.

          • dj

            Reference, please.

          • Curious

            One of many:

            The Cost of Illegal Immigration to the United States
            At the federal, state, and local levels, taxpayers shell out approximately $134.9 billion to cover the costs incurred by the presence of more than 12.5 million illegal aliens, and about 4.2 million citizen children of illegal aliens. That amounts to a tax burden of approximately $8,075 per illegal alien family member and a total of $115,894,597,664. The total cost of illegal immigration to U.S. taxpayers is both staggering and crippling. In 2013, FAIR estimated the total cost to be approximately $113 billion. So, in under four years, the cost has risen nearly $3 billion. This is a disturbing and unsustainable trend. The sections below will break down and further explain these numbers at the federal, state, and local levels.

            https://fairus.org/issue/publications-resources/fiscal-burden-illegal-immigration-united-states-taxpayers

          • dj

            In this study, the estimates appear to take into account the annual expenses by various agencies for new immigrants and their offspring. I do not see an estimate of the contributions that these immigrants make over the course of time to the economy, and what the detrimental effects of deporting them would be to various US commercial enterprises that have long depended upon immigrant labor (like poultry processing in the South and Midwest, or the fruit harvesting in the Central Valley).

            American workers typically do not take these jobs, so the effects on the survival of these industries could be significant. In the current situation, with so much antipathy toward the migrants, there is a net outward migration of workers. The situation contradicts some media claims of undocumented migrants pouring across the border. Farmers in the Central Valley are reporting difficulties in obtaining migrant workers at the times when they are needed.

            The estimates on the NPR/This American Life radio broadcast (perhaps a month ago?) were based on an economic analysis of the lifetime contributions of undocumented immigrants to society, compared with the burdens related to providing social services.

            Regarding the hospital expenses, if it were not a specific policy to deny coverage to these individuals; if they were allowed to have insurance or some other form of coverage; then they would not need show up in hospital emergency rooms for treatment, the least economic of the alternatives for obtaining medical care. Many undocumented workers do not show up in the health system at all, because they are afraid they will be turned in to the immigration authorities.

            The immigrants who moved in for the poultry processing in Georgia rented housing, and purchased food and services. Over the course of 20 years, the city that was the primary focus of the study prospered, because the ancillary businesses that supply the plants and provide goods and services to the immigrants were able to hire more people in more skilled jobs. Few in those towns complain about the immigrants now, who appear to be hard working and family-oriented people.

            The history of our country has largely been defined by immigrants. The issue of whether they were legal or illegal was typically a function of the prejudices of the times. The ethnic group which arrives most recently is perceived to be in conflict for the same resources as the group that preceded them, and the subject of suspicion and hatred. Remember the internment of Japanese and the seizure of their farms and other assets; and the refusal to permit entry to the Jews, many of whom were incinerated during WWII.

            The Big Four recruited Chinese workers for the transcontinental railroad in the 1860s, because they were hard-working, willing to do the most dangerous blasting, and did not get sick as frequently as the white workers. (But consider how badly they were treated in the 1870s, both legally and socially, after the railroad was completed.)

            Earlier groups despised the Irish, and the Irish were excluded from restaurants and other establishments (“No Irish” and “Irish need not apply”). Few would argue about their contributions (or the contributions of their offspring) over time to both our social structure and the economy. Richard Daley, Mayor Fitzgerald of Boston, John F. Kennedy and siblings, Gene Kelly, Grace Kelley, Spencer Tracy, Harrison Ford…the list goes on and on.

            The same thing played out with the Italians, who arrived later. Sinatra, DeNiro, Pacino, Stallone, Pesci, DiCaprio, etc. Imagine scientific progress, mathematics, and the atomic program without Einstein and his peers. If Sergey Brin and family had not been allowed to come from Russia, would Google exist? How many employees does Google have in this country? Perhaps 70,000 alone in California?

            Concerning the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), which evidently published the study you cite, it echoes the historical thread of dislike and exclusion:

            “As Whites see their power and control over their lives declining, will they simply go quietly into the night? Or will there be an explosion?”
            — FAIR founder and board member John Tanton, Oct. 10, 1986

            “I’ve come to the point of view that for European-American society and culture to persist requires a European-American majority, and a clear one at that.”
            — John Tanton, Dec. 10, 1993

          • Curious

            The swelling population of illegal immigrants and their kids is costing American taxpayers $135 billion a year, the highest ever, driven by free medical care, education and a huge law enforcement bill, according to the the most authoritative report on the issue yet.

            http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/record-135-billion-a-year-for-illegal-immigration-average-8075-each-25000-in-ny/article/2635757

          • pastramiboy

            yeah thats been roundly debunked.

          • Curious

            Yeah, it hasn’t and only an idiot would believe it has.

          • Noelle

            Harmeet Dillon talked about the free handouts from California legislature too. LOL.

          • Curious

            And she is 100% correct.

    • dj

      She was certainly a smooth talker, whereas the SFSU professor had difficulty presenting a coherent rebuttal. Her reference to “defecting in the streets” in India seems misplaced, too, since those aren’t the ones who would be migrating here in any case.

  • Curious

    In pushing for the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, Ted Kennedy said:

    “First, our cities will not be flooded with a million immigrants annually. Under the proposed bill, the present level of immigration remains substantially the same…

    Secondly, the ethnic mix of this country will not be upset… Contrary to the charges in some quarters, [the bill] will not inundate America with immigrants from any one country or area, or the most populated and deprived nations of Africa and Asia…

    In the final analysis, the ethnic pattern of immigration under the proposed measure is not expected to change as sharply as the critics seem to think… The bill will not flood our cities with immigrants. It will not upset the ethnic mix of our society. It will not relax the standards of admission. It will not cause American workers to lose their jobs.”

    What liars those on the left are.

    • bear_in_mind

      Right, America should be locked in a time capsule from 1951 and never ever change. Try arguing that thread to a Native American.

      By and large, the jobs immigrants take are back-breaking labor positions (think: agriculture) which most Americans don’t want> more importantly, corporations — not immigrants — have changed the labor landscape with offshoring of factory / production jobs. And automation is increasingly beginning to wipe-out those positions. That’s a CHOICE being made by corporations to maximize profits for their executives.

      • Noelle

        Republicans have this fantasy that Americans are hankering for farm worker jobs. Look what happened in Georgia(and Alabama too?) when they made life harder for the immigrant farm workers and other Latino immigrants there.

    • dj

      1965 was a few years ago. The patterns of immigration have changed over the course of fifty years, and can be expected to change again.

      Honestly, it doesn’t serve any useful purpose in a debate over something as important as our growth and well being as a society, to be name calling the people who might disagree with your point of view.

      • Curious

        A simple fact is that we do not need an influx of illiterate, non-English speaking unskilled laborers. No debate necessary.

  • Tom Scott

    This woman’s points are tired and disingenuous.

    • Curious

      Great rebuttal.

  • Noelle

    I feel badly for Dr. Taylor being attacked by the Republican lawyer.

    • Massai

      I’m fine. She was strange and partisan. I was trying to contextualize Trump and the Republican Party and Democrats, ideologically. She was all about her party. She called a Black man a racist on MLK day in a discussion where her man called Black and Brown countries “sh*tholes”. It felt like a jedi mindtrick. I been on the show 15 times and never had a guest personalize their comments like she did, which is why I checked her. Thanks!

      • KRAFFT

        I thought you did well not to react judgementally as she did, to be honest, and your exasperated responses to her vile screeds came over as utterly justified.

  • geraldfnord

    Our national case of the D.T.s not racist? See United States v. Fred C. Trump, Donald Trump, and Trump Management, Inc., FH-NY-0024,
    Docket/Court 73-1529 ( E.D.N.Y. ).

    (That he escaped a brief stint in prison [for perjury and contempt] that might have preëmptively saved our nation is due entirely to the actions and connexions of his father and of Roy Cohn—no wonder he now longs for Roy.)

    And on this day, let’s remember Rev. M.L. King’s emphatic endorsement of affirmative action, saying that it were necessary to avoid equal oppirtunity’s being a sham when played-out on a field shaped by bigotry.

    • Curious

      “I mean, you got the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy,” Biden said about Obama. “I mean, that’s a storybook, man.”

      • Noelle

        Microaggression.

    • Curious

      “A few years ago, this guy would have been getting us coffee,” Bill Clinton said about Obama.

    • Curious

      Hillary thinks that African-American youths are “super-predeators.”

      • pastramiboy

        i believe she apologized for that-while DJT hasn’t changed his tune at all.

        • Curious

          About what?

  • Michael Brant

    Yes, not only was Mr. Trump on the golf course at the time of the Hawaii missle alert, his (very late) after the fact response mentioned nothing about the event, only was another exercise in self-congratulation and his skewed view of the world. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/politics/wp/2018/01/14/the-false-alarm-in-hawaii-revealed-an-abdication-of-leadership-by-trump/

    • Noelle

      he did not come out and reassure the Hawaiians.

    • bear_in_mind

      Michael, he STILL hasn’t responded to it. All he said what another rant about ‘fake news’ and the media.

    • Bill_Woods

      The federal government found out about the false alarm the same way everybody else did.
      The president isn’t obliged to respond to screwups by state government officials.
      https://twitter.com/RadioFreeTom/status/952681044636991491

      • bear_in_mind

        No, and apparently he’s not required to act presidential to reassure Americans that our military and civil defense systems are sound in spite of this local failure.

  • Ehkzu

    Realpolitik point: if Trump–despite being the most corrupt President in American history–is reelected, it will probably be over immigration issues. I’m not saying this should be the case. Only that it is.
    Democrats say (without saying it in so many words) that if someone reeeeely wants to live here, he should get to, regardless of what America needs. The unspoken assumption is that America has an unlimited carrying capacity. This is relativesly easy to say for middle-class Americans who will not lose their jobs to unskilled immigrant labor, or get their wages driven down to below poverty level by competition from unskilled immigrant labor.

    But it’s a false assumption. The next big drought here in California won’t last for 6 years, according to NOAA–it will probably last over 20 years. Guess what that will do to the water supply?

    Democrats also make the unspoken assumption that we did something to the countries that resulted in all these immigrants trying to come here. Which is also false. Mexico’s population exploded from 20 million in 1940 to over 100 million by 2000–vastly beyond Mexico’s carrying capacity. Consequently half of Mexicans live in poverty. And that’s who wants to come here. So in advocating for unskilled laborers from Mexico immigrating illegally over, say, skilled engineers from India who are trying to go the legal route, we do America no favor and support the Mexican government’s allowing the Catholic church to determine its family planning policies.

  • Robert Thomas

    MICHAEL CHE: “Let me just say what a thrill it is to be alive at a time where ‘Porn Star Blackmails President’ is like, the fourth-biggest story of the week. At this rate, in a year from now, we’re going to see the headline ‘Trump Found With Dead Hooker’ right next to the crossword puzzle.”

    • Skip Conrad

      Unfortunately Stephanie Clifford denies any association. Trump also denies any association. Even if they’re both lying, there ain’t nothing more to do but move on.

      • Robert Thomas

        That’s what Che and I have already done.

  • Noelle

    yeah look how great individualism is for our country. every man for himself. We need more communitarian ethics.

    • bear_in_mind

      That’s funny! If Wall Street and Russian banks didn’t bail-out Drumpf seven times (he filed bankruptcy six times and was barely saved on the seventh), the empire he inherited from his daddy would have collapsed. And yet, he’s applauded for being such a GREAT self-made man by the right-wing.

      • Noelle

        Corporate welfare at its finest. I feel like no one ever called him out on whatever words he spewed due to his “wealth” now we all have to pay for this deference people gave him. Gawd help us.

      • Curious

        Trump has never filed for bankruptcy protection.

        • bear_in_mind

          In other alternative facts, the Earth is flat and the Moon is made of cheese.

          • Curious

            Sorry. Facts are facts.

  • Tess Byler

    One thing I do not hear much about in immigration reform are the number of people who travel to the States to give birth so that their child is an American citizen. I have heard that hospitals rely on this income. What are the numbers and why does this not merit discussion?

    • ldemelis

      Here is a Wikipedia article on the subject. Numbers are hard to come by, but it does appear that some hospitals, and nearby hotels, profit from international birth tourism. One of the sites is Trump Tower in Miami. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birth_tourism

    • Noelle

      Definitely lots of wealthy Chinese do this. Then their kids can attend US colleges in the future(which does help public universities’ bottom line by charging them out of state tuition).

  • geraldfnord

    Obama stepped-up immigration enforcement and deportation—but he failed to validate and endorse hatred of immigrants, so that and his background ensured that he could only satisfy people actually concerned about immigration rather than using it as a stalking-horse for racism and as an occasion of validated, exhilarating hatred.

    • Noelle

      That;s a really good point. He never gets props for his deportation policies.

      • geraldfnord

        He certainly got a lot of anger in the immigrant communities to which he supposedly just pandered.

  • Ehkzu

    Your Republican guest’s worldview is profoundly bizarre. The Republican Party is a white supremacist organization and has been since Nixon’s Southern Strategy took in all the Dixiecrats. It then morphed into a white tribe. The party is 87% non-Hispanic white. Trump based his entry into politics on the racist proposition that Presiden Obama was not an American citizen.

    The handful of non-white-appearing Republicans like your guest is just tokenism. The heart and soul of the GOP is white supremacism, as demonstrated by Pew surveys of Republican voters showing that a solid majoirty still question President Obama’s citizenship to this day.

    But just as she misrepresents the GOP’s character, that doesn’t mean the Democrats’ stance on immigration is A-OK. I’d like to see us adopt India’s biometric ID system, which would enable us to find out just who is here illegally, and would capture the hordes of visa overstays–and to deny employment to those who are here illegally. Republicans say “illegal is illegal.” How is that indefensible?

    • bear_in_mind

      “The handful of non-white-appearing Republicans like your guest is just tokenism.” Exactly.

      • jurgispilis

        Indians are of the Caucasian race, as in Indo-European. Though I don’t believe in the zoological classification of the human species into 3 races or breeds, there is a case for classifying Harmeet as white, rather than black or yellow.

        We have no problem classifying cattle or dogs into different breeds, but it certainly irks us when we apply the same criteria on ourselves.

    • geraldfnord

      That party billed itself early as the ‘Party of the Anglo-Saxon working man’, to whom ‘negroes’, Chinese, Irish, and all other non-Christian[==’Protestant’] immigrants were threats, and the Natives impediments to giving Good People living room.

      Some of them, to be closer to fair, did in fact have a soft spot for the ex-slaves, but in time their affections were transferred to the railroads and trusts, until and after T.R. and Taft. (The Democrats did not attempt to pick-up Southern black voters because their Southern white voters were too much of their base, but did welcome the immigrants and some black people up North who could see what the Repyblucans thought of them, those being plain-spoken times when your inferiors were being addressed.)

    • Jen

      I put her in the category of “I’ve got mine, screw you.” What happened to “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” or the Christian “I, the Lord, command you to do what is just and right. Protect the person who is being cheated from the one who is cheating him. Do not ill-treat or oppress foreigners, orphans, or widows; and do not kill innocent people in this holy place.” (Jeremiah 22:3) or my moto: ” Do to others as you would have them do to you.” The republican party seems to be a party of selective memory and they have all forgotten that the Bush admin started this and as Colin Powel said of Iraq “If you break it, you own it” I speak of the refugees of war, not the illegal border crossings that is. But requiring someone you just bombed the hell out of who is asking for help “what’s in it for me” is her moto.

      • dj

        For the Republicans to send 190,000 young people back to war-torn countries that they have never seen simply flies in the face of the historical traditions of our country. I wonder why people refer to the Republicans as the party of conservatism. It seems more like a radical racism which sacrifices our time-held beliefs.

  • bear_in_mind

    Listeners who want to help reshape the Trump agenda should consider following Professor George Lakoff’s work on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GeorgeLakoff

  • Noelle

    No one talked about how there is not enough people who are immigration judges, and that adds to the backlog of cases, and some of the immigrants disappear into the underground economy. I think both parties can agree we need more immigration judges, I believe this is in an immigration deal proposal.

    • jurgispilis

      Until then, we should limit immigration to a manageable level.

  • Lyn Van Tighem

    Harmeet Dhillon’s description of the kind of people we should allow to immigrate into this country – higher status, upper echelon, highly educated, likely to pay taxes and contribute to American society (I’d like to see how this one would ever be articulated into policy — how in the heck do you make a judgement on the future contribution someone will make, without all kinds of biases coming into play?), etc, is quite different, like by 180 degrees, from the original values this country was founded on — “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”
    It’s like she’s saying, only give us the cream of your crop, which is far less likely to be those experiencing discrimination, persecution, or other injustices. The original idea was that here, in this country, you will have the “opportunity to build” the kind of life you desire for yourself and your family, without a repressive government or systemic injustices to hold you back. The idea wasn’t “only come when you’ve already achieved our American definition of success.”

    • Curious

      “higher status, upper echelon, highly educated, likely to pay taxes and contribute to American society (I’d like to see how this one would ever be articulated into policy — how in the heck do you make a judgement on the future contribution someone will make, without all kinds of biases coming into play?)”

      Other countries have done so successfully for decades.

  • Scott Whittaker

    Meet me in my echo chambers

    Another outrage about race
    Another outrage about race
    Plays well to the Dems agog base

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor