People's Liberation Army (PLA) officers participate in the flag-raising ceremony at Tian'anmen Square on January 1, 2018 in Beijing, China. PLA guarded national flag and held the flag-raising ceremony at Tian'anmen Square for the first time on Jan 1.

When journalist Scott Tong moved to Shanghai to open a China bureau for the radio show “Marketplace,” he also seized the opportunity to reconnect with his extended family. Tong discovered that their stories reflect the radical changes and political shifts modern China has undergone. He joins us in the studio to talk about his book, “A Village with My Name: A Family History of China’s Opening to the World.”

Guests:
Scott Tong,
correspondent for Marketplace; author, “A Village with My Name: A Family History of China’s Opening to the World”

Marketplace’s Scott Tong Finds China’s Story in His Family Roots 9 January,2018Michael Krasny

  • Vern

    I wonder what the guest thinks about China’s move toward total surveillance, heavily relying on face recognition. If I were Chinese I would certainly not consider totalitarianism to be a part of my heritage m, any more than I’d consider pneumonia to be a part of a healthy lifestyle. But maybe Scott feels differently? Incidentally China’s use of face recognition makes me think twice or thrice about buying an iPhone x what with its Face ID.

    • Noelle

      Yes, in china they can do all that creepy surveillance software research without qualms.

      • Vern

        Also It’s done in the silicon valley.

  • Noelle

    Did he read the New Yorker article about the leader of China flattering DJT to the max and China’s plans for global influence?

  • Ben Rawner

    Almost everyday I walk past a group of dedicated protesters in downtown SF that protest the organ harvesting of “criminals” in China. Does your guest think that their claims hold water? Will China ever address its human rights issues?

  • Another Mike

    Did any of the author’s relatives make it here during the era of the Chinese Exclusion Act? Or did they all have to wait till immigration reform in 1965?

  • Curious

    What does the guest think about Michelle Obama traveling to China and praising them while telling them what a disastrous, unfair place the USA is?

    • William – SF

      The guest is probably stuck on DJT travelling to China and DJT’s praising and admiration of the Chinese leadership, like DJT did, and Fox News does with Putin.

      DJT’s totalitarianism envy.

      • Noelle

        Xi gave him an impressive show.

        • William – SF

          Narcissism candy for a narcissist.

          • Curious

            Like Barry’s messiah complex.

          • Noelle

            I prefer that at least he didn’t tweet about being a stable genius.

          • Curious

            Because he wasn’t.

          • Noelle

            But doesn’t DJT want to be an emperor too?

          • Curious

            Nope.

          • Curious

            Trump has shown that he respects the role of congress and thinks that imperial edicts that Barry used daily are bad for the country – and he is right.

          • Noelle

            He wants the Attorney General to defend him and doesn’t understand that’s not the justice dept’s role. I can agree with you about the “edicts”.

          • Another Mike

            It is typical for Presidents to expect loyalty from their Attorneys-General. Nixon’s AG was his law partner, John Mitchell. Carter’s AG was his boyhood friend, Griffin Bell. JFK picked his baby brother, RFK. And so on.

      • Curious

        Remember Barry stating he wished he could act like a Chinese dictator (and actually did act like one)?

        • William – SF

          No I don’t. Refresh my memory please.

          • Curious

            Mr. Obama has told people that it would be so much easier to be the president of China. As one official put it, “No one is scrutinizing Hu Jintao’s words in Tahrir Square.”

        • Noelle

          I think he was being sarcastic.

          • Curious

            I don’t.

  • Noelle

    it’s not a film, it’s a live dance performance Shen Yun. The ads are everywhere .

    • Bill_Woods
      • Noelle

        is it being sponsored by Falun Gong?

        • Bill_Woods

          I don’t know about “sponsored”, but it turns out there’s a strong connection.

          Quite a few of Shen Yun’s artists have themselves either been arrested and even tortured, or have had such things happen to their family members, just for practicing Falun [Gong]. Some of the dancers that you see on stage, performing with such joy and passion, have lost parents due to torture in China’s detention camps. For them, it is all too real. They feel they must do something to help their loved ones and the people of China.

          https://www.shenyunperformingarts.org/faq/index-new

    • Ron Gutman

      Right! That’s what I tried to tell forum@kqed.com when I heard Krasny say “movie” or “film”. Krasny really should be more aware of such a significant cultural event in California. Yes, there’s a connection with Falun Gang (at least the guest answered the question) but the Shen Yun show itself has only about 10 minutes out of 2 hours of related propaganda. The controversy only adds to the argument that Krasny should know about it.

  • Robert Thomas

    It’s difficult to understand how Mr Tong of the Marketplace program has nothing to comment about the subject of EB-5 visas, as they’ve been featured in news stories for at least a couple of years.

    “How to Woo Chinese Investors: With Visa Offers and the Trump Name”
    By Javier C. Hernández and Jesse Drucker
    The New York Times, May 19, 2017
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/19/business/kushner-trump-china-green-cards.html

  • Curious

    They have a wall over there, don’t they?

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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