Matthew Zapruder is the author of "Why Poetry."

Former New York Times Magazine poetry editor Matthew Zapruder thinks that far too often, schools teach students to be wary of poetry, to stress over finding a deeper, hidden meaning to the words. In “Why Poetry,” Zapruder lays out what he thinks is a better way to approach a poem, to focus on the literal meaning and visceral experience of the words. Zapruder joins us to discuss his book, his own verse and how poetry makes sense of the human experience and restores our humanity.

Guests:
Matthew Zapruder, poet and author, “Why Poetry”; associate professor, St Mary’s College of California

Rebroadcast: ‘Why Poetry’: A Manifesto for Reading and Enjoying the Art 20 December,2017Michael Krasny

  • Lisa Bourgeault

    I wanted to recommend a couple of books for kids that may get them interested in poetry. “Love that Dog” and “Hate that Cat” by Sharon Creech. Probably about 2nd or 3rd grade up to middle school age. A young boy writes notes and poems for his teacher emulating many classic styles and poems that this class is studying at school. Warning: the dog dies. Very touching and it provides all the actual poems upon which he bases his own writing.

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor