Religious statues are seen among fire damaged buildings at Cardinal Newman High School on October 10, 2017 in Santa Rosa, California.

The fires that swept the North Bay earlier this month left behind a swath of destruction: at least 5,700 homes and buildings were destroyed and most significantly, at least 42 people have died, with 27 others still unaccounted for as of Wednesday. Many people in the region have lost their homes, their place of employment or have been significantly impacted by the fires in some way. In this hour we’ll talk with faith leaders from Sonoma County about how their religions or practices are helping their communities get through the challenges and emotions brought on by the historic wildfires. If your faith is helping you cope in the wake of the North Bay fires, please tell us how. And if you’re not active in a religious or spiritual practice, where are you finding solace?

Guests:
Rachel Boughton,
roshi and director, Santa Rosa Creek Zen Center
Dale Flowers, pastor, First Presbyterian Church of Santa Rosa
George Gittleman, rabbi, Congregation Shomrei Torah in Santa Rosa
Sameh Hussein,president, Islamic Society of Santa Rosa
Mandeep Nagra, spokesperson, Sikh Temple of Santa Rosa

North Bay Faith Communities Play a Role in Wildfire Recovery 27 October,2017Mina Kim

  • EIDALM

    As all indication shows that fire started by falling PG&E sparking high voltage wire and exploding transformers, we all must request from the state and cities officials to demand that PG&E remove all their suspended high voltage wire and bury them under ground as is always the case in all Midwest and Eastern states where high wind, tornadoes,and hurricanes are common. that will avoid having that catastrophic fire and the great loss of life from these beautiful people life.

  • Gregory Roberts

    http://www.facebook@ashglaze.com

    Sonoma Ash Project is remembrance project for those
    who lost homes, businesses, parks
    and meaningful places

    The Sonoma State University Ceramics Program is
    sponsoring the Sonoma Ash project. Professor Gregory
    Roberts and his class will be dedicating the remainder
    of the semester to give victims of the wildfires a new
    object from the remains of their homes.
    Wood ash is one of the oldest, naturally occurring
    flux used in ceramic glazes. Its composition is
    unique,depending on the wood that is burned creating
    the potential a variety of results from place to place.
    The Sonoma Ash Project is proposing to collect one
    cup of ash from individual properties that will be
    used to create a glaze specific each address. Each
    sample collected will be identified with the property
    residence’s name and location (either street address
    or cross street). The samples will be collected and
    processed at Sonoma State University and entered into
    a database. The database will then be used to stay in
    contact with participating members of the community
    and notify them when the project is ready for exhibition.
    At the end of the exhibition, participants will have the
    opportunity to take their piece, free of charge.

    The Sonoma Ash project Outline
    1. Collect ash samples from homeowners, businesses, or a place
    of importance. This is the most time-sensitive aspect of the
    project. Samples will be collected from Oct. 20th – Nov. 5th
    2. On each sample write; location & contact the information
    then delivered to SSU
    Participants can also use create their own ID card to be dropped
    off or mailed to:
    Sonoma State University
    Ceramics Department
    1801 E. Cotati Ave.
    Rohnert Park, CA 95401

    3. The collected samples will be logged into a database, assign
    an ID# and processed at SSU.
    4. Ceramic pieces will be given corresponding identification
    numbers to the individual samples.
    5. The final collection will be exhibited publicly in Santa
    Rosa in Spring 2018 (Date TBA)
    6. All participants will be able to pick up their personal object at
    the end of the exhibition free of charge.

    Neighborhood group pick ups can
    be arranged by contacting:
    Sonoma Ash Project on facebook

  • Gregory Roberts
  • Arthur

    We should be concerned with the loss of life and homes and also the loss of jobs. Many of the restaurants, wineries, and other businesses are still operating. Now is the time to visit and spend your money, so those who have lost so much do not also lose their jobs. Hotel space, however, is somewhat scarce, so day trips from the Bay Area are best.

  • 1PeterDuMont2STARALLIANCE8

    This comment will not be comforting, but since it could contribute to life-saving on a truly massive scale, I feel a duty to express it.

    Years ago I heard a Native American elder speak to the effect that Mother Earth was running a fever — that she was unhappy with what human beings, collectively, were doing to her.

    With great sympathy for those directly affected, therefore: it occurred to me during the fires that ‘This is nothing compared to a single nuclear incident — much less an exchange’ — which scientists like climatologist Alan Robock have been warning could easily lead to a Nuclear Winter.

    Nuclear Winter, of course, is precisely caused by smoke from uncontrollable urban fires; which would spread out all around our precious Earth atmosphere and, aside from being difficult to breathe, would block the sun, causing crop failure and death throughout the Earth.

    If we consider these fires a kind warning shot from Mother Nature, we will do everything we can to support the historic Nuclear Weapons ban passed at the United Nations just this July 7th, and each do our part to see that it gets ratified and put into practice by all nations.

  • Bogo Mips

    Oh, no, no, NO! I take strong exception to Rachel’s assertion that science is its own religion. No genuinely science literate person would accept that as a legitimate characterization of science as a way to understand and reconcile the world. Science is distinct from religion precisely because it doesn’t compel belief without evidence. Yes, you can talk about the “miracles” science and the “wonders” nature. But that is not the same as recognizing there is a metaphysically spiritual or supernatural element to reality. Let us stop perpetuating this misconception!

  • Steve

    I found the comments by the Islamic clergy person disturbing. He said the fire was a trial sent by God to remind us that he is in control, that we are powerless. I thought of people like the husband and wife who had to spend hours in a swimming pool while the fire raged around them, and the wife did not survive, while the husband was severely burned. That clergy person believes in a God that would intentionally do this?

  • Tristan

    I found the comments by the Islamic clergy person disturbing. He said the fire was a trial sent by God to remind us that he is in control, that we are powerless. I thought of people like the husband and wife who had to spend hours in a swimming pool while the fire raged around them, and the wife did not survive, while the husband was severely burned. That clergy person believes in a God that would intentionally do this?

  • Nelson

    http://www.facebook@ashglaze.comSonoma Ash Project is remembrance project for thosewho lost homes, businesses, parksand meaningful placesThe Sonoma State University Ceramics Program issponsoring the Sonoma Ash project. Professor GregoryRoberts and his class will be dedicating the remainderof the semester to give victims of the wildfires a newobject from the remains of their homes.Wood ash is one of the oldest, naturally occurringflux used in ceramic glazes. Its composition isunique,depending on the wood that is burned creatingthe potential a variety of results from place to place.The Sonoma Ash Project is proposing to collect onecup of ash from individual properties that will beused to create a glaze specific each address. Eachsample collected will be identified with the propertyresidence’s name and location (either street addressor cross street). The samples will be collected andprocessed at Sonoma State University and entered intoa database. The database will then be used to stay incontact with participating members of the communityand notify them when the project is ready for exhibition.At the end of the exhibition, participants will have theopportunity to take their piece, free of charge.The Sonoma Ash project Outline1. Collect ash samples from homeowners, businesses, or a placeof importance. This is the most time-sensitive aspect of theproject. Samples will be collected from Oct. 20th – Nov. 5th2. On each sample write; location & contact the informationthen delivered to SSUParticipants can also use create their own ID card to be droppedoff or mailed to:Sonoma State UniversityCeramics Department1801 E. Cotati Ave.Rohnert Park, CA 954013. The collected samples will be logged into a database, assignan ID# and processed at SSU.4. Ceramic pieces will be given corresponding identificationnumbers to the individual samples.5. The final collection will be exhibited publicly in SantaRosa in Spring 2018 (Date TBA)6. All participants will be able to pick up their personal object atthe end of the exhibition free of charge.Neighborhood group pick ups canbe arranged by contacting:Sonoma Ash Project on facebook

Host

Mina Kim

Mina Kim is KQED News’ evening anchor and the Friday host of Forum. She reports on a wide range of issues affecting the Bay Area and interviews newsmakers, local leaders and innovators.

Mina started her career in public radio at KQED as an intern with Pacific Time. When the station began expanding its local news coverage in 2010, she became a general assignment reporter, then health reporter for The California Report. Mina’s award-winning stories have included on-the-scene reporting of the 2014 Napa earthquake and a series on gun violence in Oakland.

Her work has been recognized by the Radio Television Digital News Association, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association.

Mina grew up in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Oak Park, CA. She lives in Napa.

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