A gunman on the 32nd floor of a Las Vegas casino took aim at an outdoor country music festival below, killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 500, officials said Monday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

More Information:
At Least 58 Dead, More Than 500 Injured in Las Vegas Music Festival Attack (The California Report)

Guests:
Brett Eastwood, was at the country musical festival where the shooting took place
Adam Lankford, professor of criminal justice, University of Alabama; author, “The Myth of Martyrdom: What Really Drives Suicide Bombers, Rampage Shooters and Other Self-Destructive Killers”
John Sepulvado, host, The California Report
Fred Wasser, producer, KNPR in Las Vegas

Gunman Kills at Least 58, Injures More than 500 at Las Vegas Music Festival 2 October,2017Michael Krasny

  • EIDALM

    The blood of all of those Las Vegas victims lies on the hand of the the bloody NRA, and all of the bloody idiots morons who are misled and follower of the all for profit, cash for blood of innocent people life and blood…….Please stop the NRA nonsense about the guns ownership and the second amendments……As it is demonstrated in this bloody case, a man with a gun sane, or not represent real threat to us all which is against our given right to have peaceful live in a civilized society.

    • Randy Cook

      And yesterday’s Chronicle headlines are that Congress is ready to pass a law legalizing silencers and the ability to carry loaded concealed weapons across state lines with no regulatory options for the state. We could discuss this on a lot of levels, but I’m beginning to think that America has collectively lost their minds.

      • Another Mike

        Silencers are legal, at least at the federal level — there are just multiple hoops to jump through in order to acquire one.

        And I know a number of hearing-damaged shooters. The explosion of a long gun is quite close to the ear. Tinnitus is not much fun.

    • Curious

      You are unhinged.

  • EIDALM

    Gun owners are several folds more likely to use their guns against a family members, friends, or themselves, than using their guns in self defense. A house hold with a gun has an infinite more chance of shooting an innocent person than households free of guns.

    • Curious

      “A house hold with a gun has an infinite more chance of shooting an innocent person than households free of guns.”

      Ya think??????

  • Jessica

    So when mental illness isn’t actually a factor, then are we actually allowed to talk about stricter gun control?

    • Curious

      Like what?

      • pastramiboy

        no automatic weapons for any civilian. Allowing research by the NIH into gun homicides. Limits on ammunition purchases. A comprehensive federal database of firearm ownership. Close the gun show sales loopholes. there that was easy.

        • Another Mike

          Nothing stops the NIH from researching gun homicide except their implicit admission that they were merely trying to gin up support for gun control. I propose the NIH plan and execute a prospective cohort study.

        • Curious

          Automatic weapons have been banned since 1944!
          Easy, huh!!#

          • Alo Moj

            If a gun can be easily converted into an automatic weapon, that weapon should also be banned. Easy, huh!

  • TimDoyle

    If a person has to register to vote or drive a car why the hell doesn’t a person have to register all guns and ammunition?

    • Another Mike

      The Dunblane killer in the UK used his licensed handgun and police-approved ammunition purchases to shoot up a primary school.

      • pastramiboy

        so i guess we should do nothing, try nothing. any other bright ideas?

        • Another Mike

          Even though purely emotional arguments have their power, I still have respect for causation.

      • Alo Moj

        It is a matter of bringing down probabilities. If a gun buyer needs to register that is a step in the right direction and will prevent many many deaths, even if it does not eliminate all gun deaths.

        • Another Mike

          Can you connect the dots for me? How does gun registration prevent deaths?

          • Alo Moj

            People with criminal intent would not want to register and they would not want the authorities to know how many guns they bought. If a gun was used in a crime, law enforcement would have an easier time getting that gun and the shooter off the streets because they would have an important lead.

    • Curious

      Driving is not a constitutional right. But you support voter ID laws, right?

  • David Adler

    With no apparent reason for the shooters behavior, it seems possible that this could be due to “organic” causes.
    One is reminded of the small tumor found in the brain “Texas Tower” shooter Charles Whitman. In that case, a walnut-sized tumor was found pressing on his amygdala, the part of the brain responsible for fear and rage. In a note he wrote after killing his wife and mother, before he climbed into the tower to begin his shooting spree at the University of Texas, Whitman wrote, “I imagine it appears that I brutally killed both of my loved ones. I was only trying to do a quick thorough job… If my life insurance policy is valid please pay off my debts… donate the rest anonymously to a mental health foundation. Maybe research can prevent further tragedies of this type.” Perhaps this shooter had an underlying medical issue that radically changed his behavior. If a tumor causes someone to carry out these horrendous crimes, is the person “totally evil”, a “victim” of their disease or both? If we label it as a disease, do we encourage violent behavior in others? Is this a gun control issue or a health-care issue, or a social issue? Reminds me of “Officer Krupke” in West Side Story.

    • Niketana

      It’s a gun control issue to the extent that regulating guns and gun ownership is a step toward making the society we share safer. No one here appears to be saying that eliminating guns is the necessary response, but doing more to keep them ‘relatively’ less lethal and doing more to screen owners would help make concerts and other public gatherings safer while lowering the element of ‘terror’ people are experiencing as more & more of these attacks happen.
      People everywhere have a right to safety; it’s a universally recognized civil right. Of course, the gun-defense side responds that outlawing bump stocks, etc., would not remove the ‘evil’ in the soul of people like Stephen Paddock and that they would then just drive a truck into a crowd instead. Perhaps. But we would have still eliminated an attractive option, which is to play sniper and gun-toting martyr. With just a single-shot rifle at that distance, Paddock couldn’t have done near the damage, and for those who like ‘logic’ and ‘causation,’ there’s an easy deduction.
      Let’s remember, too, that the vast majority of people with small tumors or suffering from social isolation don’t act out in this way. Why not, in essence, make the street safer by putting in a couple of barricades to divert traffic, as it were?

  • practiCalfMRI

    Regarding urban vs rural law enforcement agencies being for or against gun control, since most sheriffs are elected they are acting more as politicians than LE professionals in their viewpoint. It’s entirely logical since they won’t be sheriff if they don’t reflect the majority opinion of their constituents. Instead, police organizations that do not have to face an electorate should be pushed to the fore, to lead the calls for gun control reform. Elected LE officials have a conflict of interest.

  • Robert Thomas

    From this horrific event, I expect to learn more about our news media than about anything else.

  • nitrab

    Professor’s argument is ridiculous. We cannot expect family members to be the main line of defense against mass shootings. Most people can’t stop a relative from drinking.

    • Another Mike

      The mother of the Newtown killer admitted to a friend that she was frightened of him. But she continued to live in the same house as him, with her weapons collection locked in a steel box to which only she had the key.

      • nitrab

        exactly. Family dynamics are so easily effed up. Codependency and denial are the language of most. You only have to look at how incest and child abuse happens to see how easily things get swept under the rug and things go underground.

  • Another Mike

    Mass shooters do not suddenly snap, and they provide plenty of warning signals. The Newtown killer researched other school shootings, and spent most of his waking moments playing “first person shooter” games, as if he was rehearsing. The Aurora, Colorado killer had high capacity magazines and boxes of ammunition delivered to his university laboratory. No one apparently batted an eye in either case.

    • Niketana

      So true. But given the laws in this country, certainly in Nevada, there’s not much legally that suspicious people could have done. If the guns are obtained legally and the brewing madman has no criminal history, then all people can do is tell I-told-you-so stories in hindsight.

  • SJC

    What if our entire theory of this event is wrong? What if someone else did the shooting, killing the hotel guest and staging this mass murder from his room?

    • chriswinter

      So you are suggesting that the hotel guest brought a quantity of rifles and ammunition to his room (up to 10 rifles, according to reports), only to be killed and framed by someone else who was aware of his arsenal?

    • jdoubleu

      Why would a resident of a nearby city be staying at that hotel, using a credit card for his wife/female friend (who is out of the country)?

      • Another Mike

        My wife and I have spent many weekends in SF. The reason is to be able to go out, eat, drink, and tumble into bed, instead of facing a long drive home.
        The other person’s credit card I cannot explain.

    • Alo Moj

      I think they also found a great number of guns at his house.

  • jdoubleu

    Foreign hotels often -do- screen suitcases, carry-on items, etc., before entry to the lobbies. (Westin Dhaka, Melia Yangon, InterContinental Kuala Lumpur …) My suitcase has been screened, and I have been screened in 10-15 countries before entry to a hotel. Casinos in France, Monte Carlo, etc., do screen people before entry. (Casino Barrière Deauville…) I have to be screened before entry to banks in Spain, Portugal, etc. Trash cans have been removed from airports in Amsterdam, Gare du Nord train station in Paris…) We need to start learning from the lessons of other countries where attacks have happened. What have we learned from the Boston Marathon, Atlanta Olympics…?

  • Robert Thomas

    David Kaczynski and his wife Linda are now the archetypes for family members who came to the terrible decision that they were compelled to identify a loved one as a criminal suspect.

  • Another Mike

    I’m really wondering how he got 10 (or 19?) rifles and ammunition up to his room. If the bellman delivered them, did he not wonder at the weight and dimensions of the luggage? Ammunition in particular is heavy.

    • Bill_Woods

      Multiple trips?

    • Fielding Mellish

      Golf club travel bag on wheels ..

  • Curious

    At 7:15 a.m. PST today, NPR was screeching that Trump had not taken enough steps about the Vegas shooting. The left is simply unhinged. Deranged.

    • Alo Moj

      I learned about at 11pm when it happened. I am sure Trump was woken up and told about this. Trump is famously all hours of the night tweeting about some celebrities. In that context, you do wonder why this did not get a quick response.(also 7:15 am pacific time is 10:15 eastern time.)
      But I simply disagree that NPR was screeching about this. I listened. I did not hear anyone screeching. They were just expecting him to make a statement shortly.

  • Alo Moj

    Other civilized countries are just shaking their heads.

  • Scott Whittaker

    The drill

    Who is more inspired that ISIS
    In trying to exploit a crisis?
    Get out there libcats, tweet!
    Link antigovhate to Mesquite!

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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