In just over two weeks, more than 300,000 Rohingya refugees have fled from Myanmar into neighboring Bangladesh, due to state violence against the Muslim minority group. The Myanmar military says the violence is only a response to attacks by a militant group associated with the Rohingya, and that innocent civilians haven’t been targeted. But the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said this week that the situation looks like a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” We’ll bring you the latest on the situation in Myanmar and discuss the future of the Rohingya, a stateless group that has faced decades of abuse and discrimination.

Guests:
Joshua Kurlantzick, senior fellow for Southeast Asia, Council on Foreign Relations

Anbarasan  Ethirajan, South Asia editor, BBC

‘Textbook Ethnic Cleansing’ Occurring in Myanmar, U.N. Says 13 September,2017Mina Kim

  • EIDALM

    The UN commission on human right is quite correct, this is a mass genocide and ethnic cleansing against the Muslim minority sponsored and led and approved by the Myanmar government led their military junta and sanctioned by the Myanmar national leader Aung San suu Kai WHO SHOULD BE STRIPPED OF HER NOBLE PEACE PRIZE AWARD,as well as she together with Myanmar military junta should all be tried as war criminals in international criminal court.

  • Another Mike

    Why pick on Suu Kyi? Nobel Peace Laureate Obama launched airstrikes or military raids in at least seven countries: Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, Yemen, Somalia and Pakistan, according to the LA Times.
    http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-na-pol-obama-at-war/

    • kai ming

      That’s correct. Western media has high biased in this reporting. As an elected leader, she has duty to protect sovereignty, and uphold the rules of laws. Although I sympathized with those becoming stateless under current citizenship law, country will not accept fate of Crimeria.

  • 1PeterDuMont2STARALLIANCE8

    To answer your caller’s question to the effect: “Why does then U.N. not do anything…”

    The Security Council, which has fifteen member countries at any given time including five permanent members — China, France, Russia, UK, and USA — still requires all five of the latter to vote for any action. Thus, any one of the permanent members can block action. This is the so-called “UN Veto,” which is never mentioned using that word in the Charter.

    It is absolutely legally possible, under Article 109 of the UN Charter, to call a Charter Review, or what amounts to a Global Constitutional Convention. With this We the People of the World could have a chance to upgrade the UN Charter to a more fair system in regards to the veto — to create a sensible override feature such as we have in the US over a Presidential Veto, for example — and in other ways such as creating some form of population-linked representation which is entirely feasible in the Internet Age.

    In the 72 year history of the UN, which was put together in a matter of months after WWII, article 109 has never been activated. I believe this is from discouragement that the five permanent members would all agree on a reasonable change, and ignorance on the part of the public and even many in officialdom as to how, specifically, to get it done.

    As with so many things, it is a matter of knowledge and political will.

    The caller and others are invited to volunteer or donate to nonprofits including the UNA (United Nations Association chapters, of which there are several in the Bay Area alone) or the STAR ALLIANCE Foundation of Berkeley; and to contact their elected officials and generally “Talk it up” to BUILD POLITICAL WILL for the points I have outlined above.

  • Another Mike

    Do people really want to stay where they are a hated minority? One of my aunts was an ethnic German cleansed from Yugoslavia (one of the “Donauschwaben”) who was lucky enough to be admitted to the United States. She prospered here. Widowed, she married my uncle late in life.

    • Curious

      That will be the position of whites in this country soon.

  • Tiago

    Do people really want to stay where they are a hated minority? One of my aunts was an ethnic German cleansed from Yugoslavia (one of the “Donauschwaben”) who was lucky enough to be admitted to the United States. She prospered here. Widowed, she married my uncle late in life.

Host

Mina Kim

Mina Kim is KQED News’ evening anchor and the Friday host of Forum. She reports on a wide range of issues affecting the Bay Area and interviews newsmakers, local leaders and innovators.

Mina started her career in public radio at KQED as an intern with Pacific Time. When the station began expanding its local news coverage in 2010, she became a general assignment reporter, then health reporter for The California Report. Mina’s award-winning stories have included on-the-scene reporting of the 2014 Napa earthquake and a series on gun violence in Oakland.

Her work has been recognized by the Radio Television Digital News Association, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association.

Mina grew up in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Oak Park, CA. She lives in Napa.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor