University of California President Janet Napolitano is seen at an event on expanding college opportunity on January 16, 2014 in Washington, DC.

University of California President Janet Napolitano joins us this hour to discuss the UC system’s ongoing efforts to mitigate sexual misconduct by faculty, the possibility of an enrollment cap for out-of-state students and the newly-hired Chancellor of UC Berkeley. We’ll also talk to Napolitano about her recent trip to Mexico to promote academic partnerships. What is your question for the UC president?

Checking in with University of California President Janet Napolitano 20 April,2017Michael Krasny

Guests:
Janet Napolitano, president, University of California; former U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security

  • Brian

    To Janet:

    1. Why don’t you ask the Trump administration to repeal Title IX, which has been abused and has inflicted profound, drawn-out agony upon innocent people? Title IX is more than a catalyst and amplifier of dippy paranoia. Because it has teeth, it works like a Molotov cocktail that any fool can lob at an ideological opponent to cause psychological injury and career damage.

    2. Regarding protests, why not ban all masks and facial coverings like bandanas on campus? “Black bloc” communists in particular use them as cover to commit vandalism and assaults on campus. Those facial coverings could also be used by agent provocateurs including undercover police to encourage radicals to engage in violence– this has been seen in other contexts.

  • Kurt thialfad

    Why are you giving scholarships to foreign students? UC is a public state university whose mission is to serve the citizen residents of California. i mean that’s what we pay taxes for. You’re stealing our money.

    A private college can be for sale to the highest bidder, but not UC. Don’t you get it?

    • William – SF

      You know the reasons, but just take budgetary as one. Feel free to send UC Berkeley a meaningful donation.

      • Curious

        Unfortunately, we are being taxed to support this radio station. That is, the 50% of us who actually pay tax….

        • Another Mike

          Not really. KQED thrives without government handouts, AFAIK. It’s the tiny rural stations that get federal government money, which they use to buy programs.

          • Curious

            Nope. PBS relies heavily on taxpayer funds. Nearly half of PBS affiliates in the U.S. actually rely on taxpayer funding for a bulk of expenses.

    • Another Mike

      In a university, you learn as much from your fellow students as you do in class. Even the tiny school I went to had students from every continent in my classes. You learn more about the world from classmates from Hong Kong and Nigeria than you do from classmates from Hollister and Nevada City.

      • Kevin Skipper

        It depends what you’re learning. I imagine Chico State and Nevada City College students could teach us a thing or two about kicking back and letting go of some of the pretentiousness for which SF is known. National of linguistic diversity is easy to come by around here. Not as easy for someone looking for a diversity of class backgrounds or a more grassroots economic scene. It’s all a give and take. I would be willing to bet that those same international students are learning a lot more than everyone.

    • Kevin Skipper

      Those students home countries tend to reciprocate scholarships and fellowships with future research partnerships and job exchange programs. Of course, certain nation’s students are more ‘attractive’ to Berkeleley and California than others. Keeps tech and science looking ‘sunny.’ Keeps tuition competitive. Keeps domestic marginalized communitities in their place and protects the affluent fro having to mix with them.

  • EIDALM

    As alumni of U C Berkeley, I always wondered, instead of appointing a World class scientist, leading medical expert,respected academic, or distinguished public servant, to lead the great university system, the U C regent opted for a political hack with no academic Merit what so ever, her choice was developed in secretive process that excluded meaningful participation of U C faculty, I find that real troubling and real hard to accept.

  • EIDALM

    As alumni of U C Berkeley, I always wondered, instead of appointing a World class scientist, leading medical expert,respected academic, or distinguished public servant, to lead the great university system, the U C regent opted for a political hack recurrence with no academic Merit what so ever, her choice was developed in secretive process that excluded meaningful participation of U C faculty, I find that real troubling and real hard to accept. equally troubling is the fact that Janet Napolitano have no professional experience in higher education what so ever,hired to lead the most important public research university in the U S with no record of thinking, developing and or executing higher education policy reflects the lack of appreciations of the unique challenge U C system faces today, and the specific intellectual and management experience that will undoubtedly be required to help it return to a healthy state,

    • William – SF

      EIDALM …to help with your desire to edit your comments there’s an Edit option just below your post. Pick the Edit option and you can modify your comment. Hope this helps.

    • Another Mike

      Academics largely make lousy administrators. In contrast, Ms. Napolitano has governed a state, and has run a Cabinet-level Department.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Yeah. The DHS is the most educational thing to happen to America since Kent State.

      • Die.Leit

        administrators make lousy administrators… and overpaid

        • Another Mike

          After WW II, General Eisenhower was tapped to run Columbia University. This was before my time, yet I am unaware that anyone protested his lack of academic experience.

  • John

    Why not ask her why illegal immigrants get in state tuition rates while a school receiving federal tax dollars charges out of state rates to legal U.S. citizens? This is mostly a reverse racist policy since mostly Caucasians are paying the out of state rate – liberals do not go off I said most not all – while the majority of illegals are non-white. Also nothing like being rewarded for breaking the law. What other coutnry does this for non citizens but the USA?

    Apparently it is to hard for the U.C. system to develop a three tier rate system instead of a two tier one with one rate for in state, one for out of state and one for out of country. No they can not do that since it would be discrimination.

    • Another Mike

      The illegal immigrants who get in-state tuition rates have established residency. They typically grew up here, graduating from California high schools. They and their families paid California taxes. Their families contributed their labor and talents to the California economy.

      People from other states did nothing for California.

      What other countries do this for non-citizens? All of the European Union. Students from other countries can study in a particular country’s universities under the Erasmus program.

      • Kurt thialfad

        “All of the European Union. Students from other countries can study in a
        particular country’s universities under the Erasmus program.”
        Even foreign students who are in the EU without any authorization?

        • Another Mike

          Canada and Mexico are in an economic union with the US — you’ve heard of NAFTA, right?

      • Curious

        Mots illegals pay no taxes. Those who do consume more in welfare than they put in.

        • Another Mike

          California’s Illegal aliens paid $3.2 billion in state and local taxes according to the report referenced here:

          https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-03-01/study-undocumented-immigrants-pay-billions-in-taxes

          How much did they receive in welfare?

          • Curious

            In Texas, 58 percent of illegal households collect some form of welfare, with 49 percent using food assistance and 41 percent using Medicaid. In California and Illinois, 55 percent use welfare.

          • Curious

            Californians bear an enormous fiscal burden as a result of an illegal alien population estimated at almost 3 million residents. The annual expenditure of state and local tax dollars on services for that population is $25.3 billion. That total amounts to a yearly burden of about $2,370 for a household headed by a U.S. citizen.

            Nearly half of those expenditures ($12.3 billion) result from the costs of K-12 education for the children of illegal aliens — both those illegally in the country and those born in the United States. Another major outlay ($2.1 billion) results from the need to provide supplemental English language instruction to Limited English Proficient students, many of whom are children of illegal aliens. Together, these educational costs are 57.1 percent of total expenditures.

            Other fiscal outlays result from the costs of medical care ($4.0 billion), public assistance services ($800 million), administration of justice functions ($4.4 billion), and general governmental services ($1.6 billion).

  • wandagb

    Why is the University of California being turned into a for-profit green-card mill for foreign students?

    Why is the University undermining the career futures of California kids by its use of the Optional Practical Training (OPT) program which advantages foreign students at the expense of our citizens?

    • Brian

      Why does it increasingly seem that the master plan is, screw over Americans every way possible, while public facing bureaucrats like Napolitano feign sympathy and spew bureaucratic nonsense to justify it all, making either no commitment to change things or vague non-promises?

      • William – SF

        Small typo, you meant to write Trump …totally agree.

        At least Trump didn’t populate his cabinet with Wall Street cronies, or rich friends, or fossil fuel point-one-percenters, or mega-donors with an agenda to privatize education, or … oh wait, he did!

        • Brian

          Be against corruption and cronyism, not just the other party’s.

          • William – SF

            Ditto!

          • Brian

            I’m not with any party, so I have the moral high ground.

          • William – SF

            Funny! Neither am I! …I’d be a Republican along with Lincoln, for example.

          • Brian

            I’m just against TPP, H1B, Title IX, and corporate health insurance, and for free speech.

    • jakeleone

      If you raise prices on foreign students (or auction a limited number of slots), you will limit foreign enrollement. It is likely you can do this while increasing net revenue, thereby increasing the ability of UC to fund education for Americans.

      Let the Market and a profitability requirement limit foreign studends. The profitability requirement will raise revenue that will allow use to fund education for Americans.

      In short, treat it like a business with high profit and accountability requirement.

  • jakeleone

    As far as foreign students are concerned, why don’t we auction off foreign slots to the highest bidders? If they flunk-out, we still have their money. Use that money to pay for the education of U.S. citizens.

    • Brian

      There are many of these Chinese millionaires who got lucky by being ruthless or crooked, by polluting and bribing officials, by getting huge loans and then skipping the country, and their kids are not geniuses any more than they are. The kids belong in community colleges but their parents are rich and can buy a spot at Stanford.
      But is it in the mandate of UC to seize the wealth of crooked foreigners like Stanford routinely does?
      I don’t believe it is and every spot given to a rich kid is one that’s taken from a California native.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Don’t like it? Blame Roosevelt. The man was a virtual Sinophile. Sold out a century of financial futures to them in return for cash. New Deal.

        • William – SF

          Reference, source, book attribution…?

          • Kevin Skipper

            No, William. I don’t have time. If I were to do that for each comment, I’d be on this board till the afternoon. No benefit there.

            Do what I do. If something stands out, go sniff out your own material. I’m not holding anyone’s hand, just offering direction to decent questions. Due diligence.

          • William – SF

            Zzzzzzzzzzzzzz… just fell asleep.

            Also new to me was a large part of the discussion of Roosevelt’s methods in the New Deal; I’d had a vague sense that the New Deal was funded by a strongly redistributive progressive income tax policy, mostly because I was aware that income taxes were much more progressive in the 50s than they are now, and assumed that that was a hangover from the tax structure of the 30s. Rauchway notes, rather, that the Roosevelt administration focused on raising regressive excise taxes on liquor and other similar luxuries, rather than hiking the income tax in an attempt to keep business invested in the economy (this sort of thing does start to answer some nagging confusion I’d had about why Social Security is funded in the weirdly Rube Goldberg manner it is).

            Funding the New Deal
            http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2008/03/funding-the-new.html

            A search finds nothing to substantiate your claim.

          • Kevin Skipper
          • Another Mike

            My dad once told me that no family he knew in the 1930s earned enough to have to pay income tax. So the O% threshhold was relatively quite high.

        • Another Mike

          This is all I know about that time:
          The US and China had a common enemy, Japan.
          Before the US entered the war, American military were released to join the “Flying Tigers” unit of the Chinese Air Force.
          When China became a US ally, the Chinese Exclusion Act was relaxed to accept some Chinese immigrants.

          • Kevin Skipper

            If Japan was really an enemy, we wouldn’t have protected their immigrants after Pearl Harbor. The Chinese Exclusion Act was lifted when China became willing to offer an export-grade eugenicized population as opposed to the ethnic Manchurians and Hans who were known to be of too dark a heritage to be acceptable for entry into the US in any significant numbers.

      • jakeleone

        A spot is taken by lack of economic resources. If the rich foreign student can pay more, let them. Use that money to increase the economic resources that actually create the spots in the first place. Use that economic resource to fund education for Americans.

        • Brian

          As with outsourcing, I suspect the newfound cash is going into the pockets of and bonuses for cronies.

  • Another Mike

    Two questions:
    Janet Napolitano was once Secretary of Homeland Security. Why cannot UC Berkeley provide enough security to let Ann Coulter speak on campus?
    Ms. Napolitano is a graduate of Santa Clara University, which values competence, conscience, and compassion. How does the firing of 47 UCSF IT workers, replacing them with low-cost immigrants, comply with those values, especially the last two?

    • Brian

      The cops have repeatedly stood down when the proposed speaker is conservative or otherwise entertaining.
      So the UC and city bureaucrats pretend they support free speech, but they allow violence when the speaker is someone they don’t like.

      • Another Mike

        Surely Ms. Napolitano has a few names from her DHS Rolodex she could call on for help.

  • Kevin Skipper

    Pep Talk to Self: OK Kev. Be cool. Don’t ask her about the 40’s and 50’s. Suppress urge to mention Geobbels and Fermi and Hearst. Shut up about the Bund….wwhhhoooossaaaahhhh.

    Hello Dr. Napolitano. I’m a hopeful humorist and screenwriter looking to do an in depth documentary on post-WWII Berkeley and the impact of internationally coveted minds and research agreements in the local technical and engineering industries. Perhaps the most compelling figure has been Verhner von Braun, a physicist and aerospace scientist who ‘The Plain Truth Magazine’ called “America’s leading space scientist.”

    My question; Is Berkeley using clones of von Braun, Goebblels or even the Furher himself to populate silicon valley with automatonic drones bend on world domination and delivering America’s future into the hands of our Sino-Russian overlords?

    ….whoops.

    • William – SF

      Go with a direct question, ask her about your comment yesterday(?) about admitting students of color.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Oh, you mean the relaxed admissions standards for students of color who agree to leave the state AND attend an HBCU with no guarantee of future in-state job placement?
        That’s old news.
        She already has a response prepared. Sure to be euphemistically re-worded.
        That’s the game.
        She’ll point to the team of self-conscious black yes-men and yes-women and say that HBCU’s are a better place for talented black students and liberal whites will agree with her out of a sense of discomfort and uneasy guilt.

        • William – SF

          Or you could just ask her… and let her put words to it.

          • Kevin Skipper

            There’s no question to ask. It already happened. I went to UCB’s site, they have since modified the program as a faculty exchange and HBCU mentorship program for Cal students to share their ‘brightness’ and ‘sunniness’ and ‘excellence.’

            Listen to how she’s answered Krasny’s question about diversity at UC Merced…60% first generation (hispanics?). Her response: “It depends on how you define diverse.” True.

            JN is not in the business of making people feel better about Berkelely. She’s there to oversee the operations of a gigantic publicly-subsidized, corporate education institution. It’s all business. From Germany to Japan to Russia to Palo Alto to Brasilia. To ask anything else of it would be contrary to everything I’ve learned in tangling with them. After all, I attended Berkeley schools since I was a young boy. It was the same story then as it is now.

    • Another Mike

      Kevin, no need to go with non-affiliates. Read up on UCB Professor Edward Teller, the “Father of the H Bomb.”

      • Kevin Skipper

        That would require me to acknowledge and submit direct citations which I refuse to do. (@’Willhelm’)

  • ES Trader

    I agree w/nothing Coulter says but she or Yiannopolous and anyone else has a right to express their philosophy.

    Cancelling their engagement for “student safety” concern is a vacuous reason. I suspect the true reason is the cost from damages caused by the anti fascists, which the University should not incur w each speaker, therefore institute a policy requiring sponsors to obtain insurance for the event including any area businesses experiencimg physical damage and the necesssary security needed.

    • William – SF

      The best response a protester could offer someone who’s speech they object to is their absence. There’s nothing like a vacuous theater to make a point.

  • Bill_Woods

    Instead of offering “symbolic arrests” as a service to protesters, maybe the Berkeley PD should threaten that actual law-breakers will be actually arrested?
    http://www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/Police/Home/Protest_101/Event_Checklist.aspx

    • Kevin Skipper

      It’s notoriously expensive and sticky to prosecute civil unrest. Note also that UC Berkeley is not part of BPD’s jurisdiction. Like BART Police, the UCPD utilize a state-funded police force comparable to a County Sheriff’s Department.

      • William – SF

        …comparable to a CSD. …ahhh…. not so sure. UCB swat team is brutally proficient. Read up on hostage episodes at UCB … with no implied disparaging editorial toward CSD’s.

  • Die.Leit

    How about capping the salaries of administrators (including presidents and regents) and limiting “administrative creep”?

    It’s great to hear about minority goals… should objectively improve the education, since “diversity” has been “proven” by so many opinion-makers frequent inclusive conclusory statements.

    • Die.Leit

      As though there is a well known market value for the “varied skill set” of an administrator!!!! It takes an administrator, well practiced at deception and rehearsed meaningless political phrasing, to unconvincingly convey that even getting administrators of non- or limitedly “varied skill set” would have a negative impact on the goals of the university: TO EDUCATE.

      How about H1Bs for this, or removing restrictions on legal authorization to work in the US altogether? Diversity, talent, and indentured labor all in one!

      “Politicians are the lowest form of life on earth. Liberal Democrats are the lowest form of politicians.” – Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. the Prophet George S. Patton

  • David Philhower

    Most non-educators do not know that schools are not open forums, per Supreme Court case history. Public schools are limited forums; neither students nor staff are free to speech that interferes with the smooth functioning, and safety, of students. Look back at Vietnam arm band protest cases, and Confederate flag tee shirts, etc. (from Dave in Oakland)

    • Another Mike

      Did Mario Savio know this?
      Was he even enrolled at UCB when he made his famous Sproul Plaza speech?
      And don’t conflate rules for K-12 schools with rules for universities. UCB is free to teach religion, because the students are old enough not to be indoctrinated.

  • Brian

    Isn’t floating housing in the Bay an option for UC?
    How about a capsule hotel or two?

    • Another Mike

      Caves.
      Dig caves into the hillsides.
      The bay is too far away for kids to make 8 AM class.

      • Brian

        That’s what buttle shuses are for.

  • Andrea Montalbano

    Can you explain why the UC system can not offer compensation to new professors that is competitive with other institutions of similar caliber, while the number of administrative staff out numbers that of professors by at least three to one, and often these low level administrators are paid salaries much higher than the professors they are supposed to be serving?

  • Lindsay

    I understand that emotions are running high after the election of Donald Trump and that Ann Coulter is an inflammatory figure in many respects. But I find it disturbing that Berkeley cannot host a conservative speaker without the risk of inciting violence. We should be teaching our students to react graciously to differing opinions and to use them as an opportunity for learning and thoughtful dialogue. We should be teaching our students to rise above.

    • Kevin Skipper

      Berkeley could hide a hundred conservatives at Clark Kerr or up by the Cyclotron. They make a big show out of rejecting conservative pundits because it’s attractive to liberally programmed applicants to tend to be more ideologically malleable.

      • William – SF

        …or not.

        • Kevin Skipper

          That would be nice but…The last election makes it hard to support that idea.

  • Mary

    How about offering CA students admittance at a higher rate before turning to out of state kids?

    • Mary

      A higher tuition rate, that is, for those who can afford ut

  • Kevin Skipper

    Not a fan of Cal but they could do worse in their choice of a President. She’s articulate, on point and direct. Berkeley is a big place with a lot of fingers in a lot of pots. She’s grounded and responsive. What more can an institution ask for.

  • Another Mike

    Caller wonders why Berkeley doesn’t expand their colleges of engineering.
    Why, when UC itself is outsourcing IT jobs to India?

  • Kevin Skipper

    OOH. The Village. I lived there as a kid. Went to Albany and Berkeley Schools. Village families might benefit but believe you me, Albany Schools are super-quick to show their resentment at having to take lower income kids in their classrooms. Most Village kids go to Cornell Elementary as opposed to Marin which is closer to the Hills and Kensington. By Middle School, there’s a pretty significant difference in the tracking and treatment of these students. Despite being one of the brightest students in my class, by far, once I got to Albany High, AP and Honors classes were never mentioned. I won’t even get into the reputation of the Albany Police Department when relating to young men of color in the single square-mile town. That was the early to mid-nineties. I imagine things are the same, if not worse, now.

    Hard to blame UC Berkeley for a condition like that. It takes too much cooperation between two many parties. Opportunity for all is a multi-form community issue not just educational.

    • William – SF

      My high school had no AP classes, but did have more difficult classes.
      In my military town if your hair was longer than those that served you were targeted – continued targeted harassment directly proportional to hair length.

      • Kevin Skipper

        One thing I’ll give to Albany Schools: they’re focused on achievement and excellence. They tend towards the more conservative but in the end, I’d say that regardless of race or nationality, the students that well tend to be the ones who are established and stable in the district. My parents and others with kids of color in Albany Schools can be jumpy and eager to move students back and forth between districts in the belief that they’ll shake what many see as a racial divide. This can make it difficult to develop and capitalize on the relationships and stability that are necessary for for a foothold on the upward climb.

  • John

    The University should annex UO-Eugene and make it UC Eugene. Turn it into a world class university.

  • Curious

    The average salary of a university chancellor is higher than the average salary of a CEO. Talk about leftwing hypocrisy!

  • jakeleone

    Talk isn’t interference. All the Russians did was talk.

    When Hillary Clinton said Trump supporters are deplorable, that was basically saying we can’t responsibly make up our own minds independently.

    Look, you have to start respecting people, long enough to understand them, in order to know how you can actually persuade them without throwing insults.

    You need that understanding so that you can establish a frame of reference.

    Democrats failed to respect the electorate, and they continue to disrespect the electorate by saying that we cannot make up our minds, correctly, because of words that come from another country.

    That’s just more insanity, born of hysteria and an inability to understand your own psychosis.

    Democrats need to understand that their insanity is caused by their shame at having lost the close election. And that shame is compounded by the fact that they have no respect for the supporters of the opposition, and therefor cannot persuade them. I can understand that shame leading to massive misunderstanding, what I can’t understand is the length and duration of that mental illness, but hey I am not a psychologist.

    Take this medicine Democrats, you almost won. It wouldn’t take much to have greater success in the future. But please take this opportunity to understand the opposition and engage intelligently. Believe me, if Hillary had just been a little more effective, she would be President. No government outside the United States has the power to overcome a well written and charismatic-ally given message.

    • Another Mike

      The denunciation of Russian interference in the election is enlightening.
      1. The Democrats never questioned the accuracy of the information that appeared on Wikileaks.
      2. The only other allegation made against the Russians was the spreading of fake news on social media. No cause and effect relationship between the fake news and a vote for Trump has been asserted.
      3. The DNC chair was forced to leave based on the allegations in (1), giving them credibility.
      4. The quality media, which has shown the ability to get insider information, is among the most active of the allegers of Russian interference. I have to wonder, about the Democratic primary campaign: “What did the New York Times know, and when did they know it?”

      Two conclusions seem likely:
      Hillary’s campaign had carefully crafted a narrative, that the information on Wikileaks threatened to upend.
      The quality media such as the Washington Post and the New York Times were working on HRC’s behalf by preserving her narrative.
      When the stories came out, the Democratic establishment and the quality media went on a campaign of blaming the messenger such as I have never seen.

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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