Chinese President Xi Jinping attends a welcome ceremony with Serbian President Tomislav Nikolic (not pictured) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 30, 2017.

On Thursday, Chinese President Xi Jinping will meet with President Donald Trump at his estate in Florida. The summit comes amid tense relations between the two nations over differing strategies toward North Korea, China’s military presence on islands in the South China Sea and Trump’s repeated criticism of China’s trade policy. In this hour of Forum, we’ll preview President Xi’s visit and discuss the current state of U.S.-China relations.

Mentioned on Air

U.S. Policy Toward China: Recommendations for a New Administration

Chinese President Xi Jinping and President Trump to Meet Amid Rising Tensions 4 April,2017Michael Krasny

Guests:
Orville Schell, director, Center on US-China Relations at the Asia Society in New York City
Anna Han, associate professor of law, Santa Clara University School of Law
Susan Shirk, chair, 21st Century China Center, School of Global Policy and Strategy, University of California San Diego

  • EIDALM

    I believe that China has far more control on North Korea than we are led to believe, China uses North Korea like their own mad dog on a leash, they do that as to play the good cop role so that they get their way in getting better deal in all aspect including trade, their expansionist policies in the region and China sea with the U S, Japan, and South Korea,…Their whole role of good cop, bad cop regarding North Korea may end up to be very dangerous game as the North Korean leader is a loose cannon and could be extremely reckless as to fire missiles or even nuclear bombs on Japan, South Korea, or even the U S.

    • jakeleone

      If China could take North Korea, I would be all for it. Frankly the Chinese would be better stewards and friends to South Korea, Japan, and the U.S. And we should work out a deal on Taiwan.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Do you really imagine that there is some real enmity between China, N. Korea and its Southern Neighbor!?!? All three benefit from security and prosperity while the circus effectively holds Amerikan interests at bay.

        • jakeleone

          Not enmity, but political stake and personal survival will come into play. Kim Jon Un will use his military, for as long as he can to head off such an invasion, in the mean time a lot of people die. Then administering North Korea is another task, it will require money, people, aide. It would all be just a big expense. And I agree, there is no real enmity between North Korea and China, indeed they like each other and already aide eachother, politically, militarily, strategically and financially.

          But having said that, North Korea invites a war and if they would just tone it down a bit, Kim Jon Un could already retire as dictator for life. A war between North and South Korea would be a war between China and all the other asian nations.

          War just kills people and makes most of the rest poorer.

          • Kevin Skipper

            North Korea won their last war. We lost our last two. The two before are still up so a certain level of debate. Von Braun likely saw at least one of them as a stalemate. I’d say that of both. That makes us 0-2-2 for the last four.

            Curious to know the source of intelligence regarding North Korea’s arsenal. The best that US news seems to have accomplished is that very weird Nat Geo piece with Lisa Ling.

    • Kevin Skipper

      Amerika faithfully and dimwittedly tows the N. Korea narrative just like the pack mule that it has always been.

  • EIDALM

    20B years ago some said that the U S will end in a war with China in 20 tears which is now, well the fact we already had the War and China has won, that was achieved with all of the unfair trade deals that resulted in losing bear all of manufacturing jobs to China, as they make near all the products we consume in the U S at such cheap cost using their slave labors from food, consumer electronics, furniture, automobiles, cloth, shoes. even military gear, we also in debt to China in tune of trillions, and trillions of dollars….Yes we did have war with China, and they won big while near all Americans were sleeping on the wheel,

  • EIDALM

    25 years VCRS sold for as much as 1500 dollars, new cars as little as 2000 dollars, a house in Berkeley flats as little as 25000 dollars,,,,Today thanks to all made in China junk you can buy a DVD player for 20 dollars, but a house in Berkeley flats sell for more than 700 thousands dollars which is beyond most the means Bay Area new home buyers, you must make the connection as China with the blessing of the U S government stole all American manufacturing and technical jobs and make all of the junk we consume in the U S, yes they did, but they also destroyed millions of well paying manufacturing and technical jobs in the U S and with it the great American middle class as they turned many thriving manufacturing cities, like Detroit,Michigan and hundreds other manufacturing regions into near total vacant decay of falling and deserted buildings,b poverty, crimes, and destitution,,,,,,,,Yes China won the war no thanks to the American government which was pawned and corrupted by the lobbies of the Wall Street and Multinational corporations….

    • Kevin Skipper

      You should see the Diamondhead Neigborhood on Oahu! Chinese and Japanese investors came, cash in hand and bought out whole blocks on the spot. Now, a center-island two and two bungalow goes for about $1.25 Million.

  • jakeleone

    The problem is the value of the dollar vs the value of the yuan. That high value is driven by the fact that the U.S. allows foreign direct investment. Chinese business people want dollars so they can move their wealth to the U.S. This causes bubbles in various U.S. housing markets, BTW.

    If China would allow foreign ownership, there would be no issues.

    • Kevin Skipper

      Foreign ownership=loss of sovreignty. A role more fitting of adolescent post-colonial states like Amerika, not grown man supernations like China. They paid the cost to be the boss and no amount of tee-totalling will level the field. Amerika is a dependent. A military offshoot of debt-ridden Western Europe. A blind neighbor and proxy of Russia. An immigration footstool of Canada, Cuba and Brazil. A write off. An afterthought. So much for economic hegemony, eh?

      • jakeleone

        What you are saying is very true. But in this case I think the modern Chinese government could easily handle it. But they will need to explain the reasoning to the people before it would ever be accepted there, might take decades.

        • Kevin Skipper

          China has nothing to explain. They lay down the rules a year ahead, forward the decree to the global banking community and leave it to European and American state media structures to work out the kinky narrative as they see fit. Hands off. “I don’t care how you do it. Just have my money, or else.”

  • Ben Rawner

    Currently China holds the most power in the US-China relationship. China owns a trillion dollars worth of treasury bills, produced over 50% of products consumed in the US, and have developed a scientific community that now rivals the ones in Europe and the US. It looks like the 21st century is going to be a Chinese century. What power does the US have?

    • jakeleone

      The only real problem in China is that they don’t have enough high paying jobs. That may change, it might not. The low pay is a just a fact that their currency is not as valued as the dollar. The U.S. could print money, and the Chinese business people would still want it. Because they can move that money to a non-kleptocratic market.

      The best thing that China could do (but don’t tell them) is to allow foreign ownership of land and businesses. This would be a big step for them (hey they could always nationalize it, Communists are good at that). That would fuel speculative booms that keep up the value of their currency while simultaneously keeping people employed.

      The U.S. has to develop more internal industry. We can’t just borrow forever without a crash (and it could happen if the Chinese do what I just said). But we’ll have to do it via productivity gains.

    • Kevin Skipper

      Just a lot of accounts payable. A disasterous immigration policy. An under-read, over-armed lower-middle class. A still-present slave class. An lagging and overpriced educational system? HMO-sanctioned hospitals/butcher shops….

    • Ben Rawner

      I misspoke. Only 10% of consumer goods are manufactured in China.

    • Curious

      Thanks, Barry!

  • Kevin Skipper

    This ain’t abut VCR’s.

    America has owed China money since the Revolutionary War, Slavery, “Emancipation” and Roosevelt’s “New Deal.” China has done the US the service of being willing to redistribute public debt accumulated from the country’s myriad investments in White Supremacy.

    In closing, let’s get something straight. Black folks have paid our debt to China and a good portion of yours. If you don’t pay your share, they’re coming for you. Don’t expect us to help. First, few of us know karate. Secondly, with China’s handle on both chicken recipes and artificial hair, urban folk face a conflict of interest. Things being as they are, we’re are likely to err on the side of consistency and convenience as opposed to nationalism or patriotism. That being said, y’all are on your own on this one.

  • 1PeterDuMont2STARALLIANCE8

    I have heard repeatedly in recent months to the effect there are ‘no good options’ regarding North Korea. Perhaps that’s because all the options being considered are “sticks” rather than “carrots;” negative approaches rather than positive ones.

    Of course “negative on the negative is positive,” (Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 1972.) But at the same time, one normally wants to fight fire with water, right? So here’s a novel approach to consider: Defense through good will.

    Please ask your Forum guests: How can the nations of the world, perhaps led by the U.S. and China: overwhelm North Korea’s bellicosity with a “smothering” package of love offerings toward the true and lasting welfare of its people?

    Please discuss what concrete measures might be offered to North Korea and its human population to meet legitimate human needs.

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    Michael, your guests are discussing China as though they think the same as the West. Please address differences in world view. As my Beijing scientist friend says “who is the US to criticize China’s government with all the bad the US has done?” They are not the China of Mao and they are certainly not free-enterprise capitalists with a declaration that all men are equal. Your show today gives the impression that it’s our relationship with China is a head to head disagreement on issues. That avoids differences in world-views.

    • G Whiz

      I agree. All this talk is bluster that will blow away over time… and China thinks historically. Capitalism has taken root in China and they are no longer country bumpkins. They have a natural poker face and don’t readily show their hand. Trump is correctly viewed as a buffoon in power, and China has never felt inferior to the great white society. All this said, it will be interesting to watch the interplay between these leaders. It will be like a parent watching a child who thinks he’s getting away with superficial niceties as diplomacy.

  • Kevin Skipper

    I’m not buying this middling explanation of WMD’s, as if China is somehow bound to the imaginary boundaries of MAD or other MIC charades.
    Susan Shirk is going to lie us all the way into WWIII.

    Oh. She’s quoting a UCSD report. No wonder her patter sounds like a half-chewed bolus of fictitious design.

    Call Professor Yoo for help. He’s a slightly better liar.

  • Kevin Skipper

    Difference in American and Chinese “views”: 3,000 years of civilizational history. Amerika needs to pull up a stool, shut up and listen to experience, not power narratives, which are a joke.

  • Chris1030

    did anyone talk about Trump getting his trademark granted after many years of failing to get it, right after he confirmed the ‘One China” policy?

    • Kevin Skipper

      Tell me, what authority does Trump have to confirm One, Two, or Ten China Policy. Sounds like he’s reading from his work orders. He’s a subcontractor.

  • Kevin Skipper

    We all know that Trump’s a useful idiot with no clothes, RIGHT!?!?” Actually, No. That’s not right. Even if it was, it would do virtually nothing to bring understanding to the subject. In intellectual saboteur. Take that smokescreen of unquestioned rhetoric to a Hillary rally.

  • Kevin Skipper

    China: Hey, Amerika! Who’s your daddy?
    US: Um, Britain? Russia?
    China: …Good enough. You got my money?

    • William – SF

      They don’t want their money. It’s safer where it is and provides pseudo leverage that conservatives use to ply voters for votes through fake fear of deficit balloons. It’s a ruse.

      • Kevin Skipper

        It’s anything but a ruse. American debt to China is real. Failure to pay has cost us our transportation, education and information industries. Housing is soon to be next, followed by our government and militaries. I could help but I won’t. Gonna let the pendulum swing on this one.

        • William – SF

          If U.S. debt was an issue, Treasury bonds would pay vastly higher interests rates. It’s just the opposite, investors have functionally paid the Treasury to store their money in the cloud. It’s a ruse. It’s a fake story conservatives use to scare voters .. for votes – claiming that conservatives are better at managing the governments money — now that is a ruse and funny!

          • Kevin Skipper

            They take turns. Conservatives rally opinions to horde funds. Liberals spend them in ever smaller, manageable circles.

            One hand puts the lotion into the basket which is, I guess, held by the other hand.

  • 1PeterDuMont2STARALLIANCE8

    Thanks for the followup specificity, Dr. Krasny (and guests.) Security for North Korea’s population could be a feature of the good will package other nations and the family of nations can offer.

    • Kevin Skipper

      What family? China is a Fatherland. Head of the Household. Amerika is an arm, at best. More like a wrist. Increasingly limp and arthritic…

  • 1PeterDuMont2STARALLIANCE8

    As to the last callers point re the White House vs the President’s retreat: it may well be there is a certain genius and practicality to host important leaders in a relaxed setting.

    • William – SF

      …like Camp David

  • William – SF

    China’s vulnerability remains the same – controlling its population and maintaining those in power. The ‘yuge’ human migration from rural to urban to supply cheap labor for state controlled enterprises is now their greatest dependency. Want leverage with China, reduce the trade deficit and limit China money buying/investing in US properties/companies.

    • Kevin Skipper

      If that was going to happen, we would have build our own Transcontinental Railroad, San Francisco, Los Angeles, the Central Valley and been able to finance our own New Deal instead of selling Amerika’s future to a global credit/welfare system.

      • William – SF

        All that happened before China became a competitor to the U.S. All so much inconsequential water under the bridge.

        • Kevin Skipper

          That happened as China reestablished itself as a benefactor to a cash-strapped Western economy. There is no competition, only the readily accepted suggestion of it. Like a dog track with a mechanical rabbit, we can run, bark, and win all the trophies we want. Doesn’t change anything. Those greyhounds run for food and the ‘right’ to reproduce. What makes Amerika’s labor force any different?

  • Kevin Skipper

    Press can claim that respect for China is ‘difficult’ all that they want. Something tells me that somehow or another, the Executive Branch will find a way to get it done.

    • William – SF

      Yup, Trump will get the Chinese to admit that global warming is a hoax and that they started the hoax.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Seems to me that China already used the green craze to catapult its industrial base ahead of the competition then used Trump and the GOP as a platform for a virtual rug-yank. The US is left holding the bag which is full of a mixture of clean coal and now-worthless carbon credits. The genius is nowhere to be found. Probably eating dim sum over the bank to which he laughed, all the way.

  • Kevin Skipper

    Xi Jinping. Dynastic name.
    Look at that nose. End of story.
    Just say it. He holds all the chips. King of the World.

  • Curious

    And still no reporting by KQED/PBS/MSM on the mounting evidence of Obama and his regime spying on Trump, his family, and his associates ………

  • Sar Wash

    Trump is Putin’s puppet and will obey whatever Putin tells him to do. Trump’s China policy will be dictated by Russia’s. Trump wants to put Russia first and America last.

  • ES Trader

    Orville Schell’s response to call in woman asking about cost of Maralago, displayed complete ignorance to Xi & Chinese officials desire for a 2day meeting there.

    Shinzo Abe received a 2day getaway w/his wife, it’s Chinese ego that demands a equal prestige relative to it’s ancient foe, that it had attempted to invade since Kublai Kahn’s disaterous failure which spawned the name Kami Kaze or Divine Wind.

    Jealousy is wrapped in a Red Flag of Communist Chinese.

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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