Nancy Pelosi who is the minority leader of the House of Representatives speaks beside House Democrats at an event to protect the Affordable Care Act in Los Angeles, California on January 16, 2017.

Covered California released an analysis Tuesday of how the GOP bill to replace the Affordable Care Act would affect the roughly 1.5 million Californians who buy insurance through its marketplace. Covered California found that the average subsidy under the Republican plan would amount to about 60 percent what is provided under current law, and that a “dramatic increase” in out-of-pocket costs for seniors will cause many to drop coverage. It also found that enrollees living in high cost areas like San Francisco would feel negative impacts. The report comes a day after the Congressional Budget Office concluded that the GOP bill would leave 24 million more people without health insurance by 2026. We look at the bill’s potential effects on California and the politics behind it.

Guests:
Carrie Feibel, health editor, KQED

  • EIDALM

    According to the GOP the NOT really health plan short summery is if you get sick and you are not rich, you might as well read your last prayer and die.

  • EIDALM

    The grand ole Republican party is dead, it has been taken over by the Military Industrial Complex, the Neocons, Theocons. Wall Street, and Multinational corporations. The Republican leaders sold their soul and the American people to big money and totally betrayed the American middle class and the poor.

    • Curious

      Apparently you missed the elections.

      • turquoisewaters

        People are known to not vote in their own best interest, for a variety of reasons. Republicans use this shamelessly.

  • Skip Conrad

    The NY Times headline reads “45 million will lose coverage …”. USA Today headline reads “45 million may lose coverage …”. Forum is saying headline reads “45 million will lose coverage by 2026”. That’s in ten years. Tell us, please what will happen in the interim. In 2018? In 2020? In 2024? Can we get some real information about this bill?
    I got an idea – let’s have a public option like Britain or Canada. Let’s make the public option for Americans.

    • William – SF

      There’s lots of writing on the subject, google it.

  • geraldfnord

    We’re willing to make so much entirely dependent on how much money one can earn, inherit, or steal, why not life itself?

  • Bob Stone

    Obamacare needs to be fixed. I currently pay $330/ month for a plan with a $6,300 annual deductible. There is nothing affordable about the Affordable Care Act. Why don’t you focus on this problem?

    • Robert Thomas

      My 59 year old neighbor pays over $6,000 a year just buying insulin. Her ~$6,000 per annum deductible means she easily exceeds this now; she’d be overjoyed to maintain a guarantee of that deductible, with a $1,000 per month premium. Her assets allow her a modest living but she has too many to qualify for MediCal. Cross your fingers that you aren’t made cripplingly ill by such a thing as adult-onset type-I diabetes.

  • Robert Thomas

    Several relatives and two friends of mine are my age or a few years older. In their work lives in the technology industry it’s acquitted them very well to have scrupulously scrimped and paid off a mortgage; to have saved their capital and invested it in a way so as to receive from it a modest income so if by age sixty or thereabouts, they may live comfortably, if modestly, if the industry decides to walk away from their age cohort.

    That is, unless they get sick.

    The ACA allowed the highest premiums to be a maximum of 300% of the lowest premiums for a region. The AHCA seems to change this to 500%. It’s one ting to pay half of a $30,000 annual income for health insurance. It’s another thing to pay over two thirds of that income – $24,000?

    It’s ruinous. It seems to be coming.

  • pm05

    How do these tax credits work? Don’t you have to pay out the money and then declare it – a year later – on your tax returns ? Who has that kind of money and who can wait a year ?

  • Bill

    What % of GDP is now spent on health care, and what would it be with a single payer system?

  • geraldfnord

    I belueve Mr Krasny has noted that the A.C.A. has tried to avoid the sale of ‘insurance’ plans that consist of an envelope containing six aspirin and a cheerful message; I gather that the ‘replacement’ plan omits that kind of Market interference, freeing us all to buy something called ‘insurance’….

    • William – SF

      And the ACA has kept women from having to squeeze that envelope between their legs as a form of birth control. The Republican alternative, not so much.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Let’s be honest. Population and color-quota-wise, the so-called “White” sub-racial category can’t afford birth control. To them, abortions are for pickaninnies, half-castes and mongoloids. Eugenics blow-back?

        • William – SF

          I know no woman, regardless of race, that hasn’t used birth control or hasn’t done “something” to terminate a pregnancy. None. Ask around. Women reproductive rights are always under assault by Republican men.

          • Kevin Skipper

            Individually, it’ hard to see any kind of disparity. The patterns reveal themselves when one views the process over time and across larger sample groups.

          • William – SF

            What patterns?

          • Kevin Skipper

            For instance, the frequency with which mothers are encouraged to purse adoption in favor of abortion. The preponderance of women of color who pursue abortion for economic and not health reasons, or the idea that a woman’s privilege, or the pursuit of it is threatened by pregnancy. Look at the newsstand. White celebs, aged 16 to 46 sport miraculous ‘baby-bumps.’ Only black women I’ve seen get pregnant are Halle Berry and Janet Jackson (both born 1966) for birthing the ‘love children’ of some white man.

          • William – SF

            Celeb mags, and such, serve up entertainment as crack, for profit, for those seeking it. Their recursive ideology is predictable. I give them no mind.

            Yes, women are judged when they acknowledge being pregnant.

            All of the women I’ve spoken with who acknowledge ending a pregnancy said they did it because they didn’t want a child (at that time), not because of health reasons. Not really an economic reason either; they speak of not being able to manage a child and their lives. For all of them, planning for pregnancy, if desired, is paramount. Is you’re experience with women different?

          • Kevin Skipper

            It varies, indeed. The most important example would be my sisters. All of them have kids. My closest one chose to have both of hers and raise them as a single mom. Regardless of her reasons or planning, I’ve always supported the fact that she’s a mother first, foremost and always.

            I have no right to speak to the right or wrong of any decision made by any woman. I can only speak to what I know, as a man, of the structure and thinking that contribute to providing the boundaries and contexts within which these decisions are so often made.

            Perhaps my own relationships and shared experiences around the subject most strongly inform my understanding that regardless of how one feels about the thinking behind a decision, there is no arguing with the fact that the final right lies with her who ultimately stands to make the greatest sacrifice.

            I don’t argue abortion. I argue the terms of parenthood. I don’t argue with contemporary infantilism and anal-retentive amnesia. I argue the terms of adulthood and awareness. I don’t argue what it’s right or wrong to want or not. I argue the way by which we are taught to deserve. What are we really responsible for. Overpopulation? Of whom? Where? Why?

            Mars? Been there. Done that. The real work is here and now. Any other thinking is a joke.

          • William – SF

            Yup.

  • geraldfnord

    As a disciple of Ayn Rand, Mr Ryan has a fundamental moral objection to the poor’s achieving anything like equity with the wealthy in any wise.

    • Kevin Skipper

      well put.

    • Robert Thomas

      Representative Ryan is notable for his earnest concerns about the people; among these are his consternation – related to an adoring CPAC audience – over other people’s desire that children be too, too generously provided with “full bellies” at the expense of such allowances threatening them with “empty souls”.

      The state of a child’s nutrition would likely not have concerned Miss Rand, either; unlike Ryan, she was also free of the burden to consider the hygiene of their souls.

  • Kevin Skipper

    Why shouldn’t health plans disproportionately affect older Americans? Not only are they the ones who get sick most often but their generations must also take responsibility for the economic and, to a degree, social mess that we are in. Why not require those who’s advantage and comforts were gained during times of segregation and inequality to pay their fair share.

    Why do they deserve to be put up in comfort when they failed to make the allowances for it when they could have? They could have built hospitals and hospices but instead, they wanted to hire cops, put freeways and dumps in between them and their colored neighbors. They could have educated a population to care for them but no. Look at the prisons and computer companies. THERE is your health care. You want it, go ask “The Cloud.”

    • Robert Thomas

      Whether boomers are properly assigned the principal responsibility for “the mess we are in” or not is debatable.

      I’m not sure that it doesn’t rest more squarely with the cohort that raised itself obsessed with playing video games; with a musical sensibility nurtured by the music of video games; with “educating” itself by means of “graphic novels”; by relying upon a segregated martial fraternity – paid for by Chinese investment – for its national security; that cannot get through a casual lunch with a friend without attending to its phone fifteen times; that incurred ruinous post-secondary education loans seemingly oblivious to its ability ever to pay for the service.

      Assigning blame! Try it! It’s fun!

      • William – SF

        Woooohoooo!

      • Kevin Skipper

        RT in the m-f’n house!

        Glad I provoked a response. Not assigning blame, simple questioning precedent. BTW, I don’t know anyone in my age group who wrote, developed or addicting THEMSELVES to video games or television. Seems to me, it was the same generation that promoted ‘latchkey kids,’ two-income households and dismantling welfare.

        As for musical tastes, I’m from the G-funk era. I play roots reggae on an acoustic bass and have played Afro-Caribbean percussion since childhood. My Dad worked at the best jazz joint in the area (Kimball’s East, hands-down no questions) before it closed down. If we’regoing to talk about musical sensibilities, lets talk about how Fats Domino and other Colored American composers were able to influence four generations of “original” white music!?!?!

        Say what you will about graphic novels. I would challenge you to find a better way to convey the subtleties of Voltaire’s “Candide” to the first-time reader who might not have access to prep-schools or private tutors.

        Who invented the smartphone!?!? Not millennials!

        Chinese investments: How about the New Deal? Transcontinental Railroad? Slavery? The Navy’s Pacific Fleet? The Vanderbilts? FDR? Their mansions? NATO’s parachutes!?!? C’mon.

        Lastly, our generation didn’t ask for a dried-out job market or excessive public education. In fact, I believe that was, again, a gift inherited from previous generations embrace of unrealistic exceptionalist expectations.

        Fun? That’s an understatement.

        • Robert Thomas

          We’re all in the same thermodynamic boat, Kev.

      • Kevin Skipper

        The details that you present were instituted by YOUR generation in order to discredit the intelligence and maturity of incoming generations so as not to challenge your communo-fascist, authoritarian sympathies. To spite your face, you cut off your nose. When forced to move on, you start sawing at your legs.

  • Kevin Skipper

    Don’t get me wrong. I love my elders and I really wish that you guys could live forever. Things being as they are, we must accept certain realities as they are.

    To put it plainly and simply today’s youth should not be held responsible for the lifestyle and mentalities that have created an abundant and frequently ill elder class. As I have already spoken to certain structural insolvencies as they pertain to providing the opportunity and promise experienced by preceding generations, as I have alluded to the manner in which war and expansionist economics have colluded to inform a condition of generational disenfranchisement.

    If the story is true, and the system is broken and underfunded, admit it and divest from the thinking that disallows an effective solution. Stop pretending that the “market-based approach was EVER sufficient to serve society as a whole. Be willing to place the power and thinking into the hands of those who can actually WORK! To do otherwise is to embrace a falsified and ill-attained presumption of dignity, the consequences of which will only be suffered by those of who are least responsible for their existence.

    • William – SF

      Give that speech to the party of no! – Republicans.

      Public health care has been solved by lesser democratic societies than ours. Republicans want the resources necessary for proper public health care to go to their wealthy donors.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Democrats conveniently and consistently fail to provide feasible solutions sufficiently independent of market restrictions.

        You’re right. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that it’s a purely American anomaly.

        • William – SF

          Live free and die sooner w/o health care. Oy!

          Democrats tried, …went so far as having a Black President push Bob Dole’s Republican plan Democrats felt too lame in Clinton’s reign. I wish Obama demanded better, and fought to do better, but he’s a realist, with unreal expectations from those of the other aisle.

          • Kevin Skipper

            He lacks the experience and upbringing that one might normally equate with an educated black American man. His color is a picture but not a story. The results show it simple and plain.

  • De Blo

    Trumpcare is an unmitigated disaster. 24 million Americans will lose access to health care and tens of thousands will die. The Republican party is the most anti-life/ pro-death organization in the country.

  • turquoisewaters

    Focus, people: this is all about moving money from the poor to the rich. Everything else is a side show.
    Watch inequality grow when the top 1% get more and more tax cuts and the poor lose more and more of their safety net. Mission accomplished for Trump/Ryan/Koch and the whole fine gang. Morals are for little people.

  • Curious

    President Trump should just let Obamacare collapse.

  • Curious

    Pelosi is not firing on all cylinders.

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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