Megan Marshall poses for a portrait.

Poet Elizabeth Bishop once famously told fellow poet Robert Lowell that “when you write my epitaph, you must say I was the loneliest person who ever lived.” Bishop must have understood what it was to be lonely: She was an infant when her father died and a child when her mother was institutionalized. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Megan Marshall sheds light on the life and legacy of the poet in “Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast.” We’ll talk with Marshall, a former student of Bishop’s, about the very private and reticent poet.

Guests:
Megan Marshall, author, "Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast"

  • Kevin Skipper

    Women are smart, funny and awesome.

    • William – SF

      Pandering will get you everywhere.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Funny, no one questions my sources or their factuality HERE. Only in my anti-pandering appearances. It’s all just a segue into my desire to describe mainstream media, as a whole, as racist and on a secondary level, sexist and misogynist.

        I just hope Krasny doesn’t say that Bishop’s writing reminds him of Alice Walker. That being said, I must admit, the descriptions of her abuse at the hands of her father do indeed bring that author to mind. Finding myself guilty of the same generalizations that I claim to condemn.

        • William – SF

          That’s not funny.

          • Kevin Skipper

            Funny is in the result. From Trump to Paul to that Zimering character to the University of California to Sweden’s pro-rape subculture, a limitless parody. Ever-dependable pure and utter comedy. A boon for burgeoning satirists such as myself,

          • William – SF

            I find nothing funny about how the right (politicians, media, supporters) has turned into Saturday morning cartoon characters.

          • Kevin Skipper

            Trump, along with the Clintons, was an oft-featured character on Stephen Spielberg’s ‘Tiny Toons.’ Which was, in fact, part of Fox’s line-up of weekday afternoon kids programming. At that time, all three (four, if you count Steve) were liberals, not neo-conservatives. Montana Max, his dad, Yosemite Sam and perhaps Hampton J. Pig were the only Republicans.

            As for the rest of the cast of our government follies, I’d say it’s more a combination of “Jurassic Park”, “Lord of the Rings” and “Game of Thrones.” The latter, I have not actually seen but assume to be a major catalyst in the shaping of the critical standards by which the younger demographic prefers to view social issues, particularly political participation and diversity.

          • William – SF

            Winter is coming.

      • Kevin Skipper

        Besides, my culture has a well-documented record of celebrating our female intellectuals, artists and political leaders. Turns out, our lack of sympathetic alignment with Western misogyny forms the basis of our cultural, scientific and civilizational schisms. It is the strength and salvation of our race.

  • Kevin Skipper

    Won the 1976 Neustadt International Award for Literature. A curious list of laureates.
    Would she be considered part of the first or second wave of feminist scholars?

  • Kevin Skipper

    Now we’re reading my comments… Nice.

    My question was a joke. Her time frame, reluctance to be labeled a feminist and reception of mainstream awards and recognition suggest that she was, indeed, of the so-called, second wave. Seems that her trans-racial, trans-class appeal supports the same notion.

Host

Michael Krasny

Michael Krasny, PhD, has been in broadcast journalism since 1983. He was with ABC in both radio and television and migrated to public broadcasting in 1993. He has been Professor of English at San Francisco State University and also taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco and the University of California, as well as in the Fulbright International Institutes. A veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures, he is the author of a number of books, including “Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life” (Stanford University Press) “Spiritual Envy” (New World); “Sound Ideas” (with M.E. Sokolik/ McGraw-Hill); “Let There Be Laughter” (Harper-Collins) as well as the twenty-four lecture series in DVD, audio and book, “Short Story Masterpieces” (The Teaching Company). He has interviewed many of the world’s leading political, cultural, literary, science and technology figures, as well as major figures from the world of entertainment. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including the S.Y. Agnon Medal for Intellectual Achievement; The Eugene Block Award for Human Rights Journalism; the James Madison Freedom of Information Award; the Excellence in Journalism Award from the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association; Career Achievement Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and an award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association. He holds a B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. from Ohio University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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