hula

The stereotypical image of a hula dancer often features a woman in a grass skirt on a beach. But Patrick Makuakāne says that’s a far cry from 21st-century hula. The Hawaii-raised and San Francisco-based hula master’s shows are elaborate stage productions weaving in everything from opera and electronic music to ’90s pop. His newest show, “The Natives Are Restless,” looks at the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy and the native resistance that followed. He and his dance troupe, Na Lei Hulu, are also the subject of a new book by the same title, by local author Constance Hale. She and Makuakāne join us to talk about the evolution of hula and what it means to be Hawaiian in the 21st century.

Related Links:

Not Your Grandma’s Hula: New Book Looks at the Evolution of Hawaiian Dance 23 September,2016Mina Kim

Guests:
Patrick Makuakāne, kuma hulu and director, Na Lei Hulu; "The Natives Are Restless"
Constance Hale, author, "The Natives Are Restless: A San Francisco dance master takes hula into the 21st century"

Host

Mina Kim

Mina Kim is KQED News’ evening anchor and the Friday host of Forum. She reports on a wide range of issues affecting the Bay Area and interviews newsmakers, local leaders and innovators.

Mina started her career in public radio at KQED as an intern with Pacific Time. When the station began expanding its local news coverage in 2010, she became a general assignment reporter, then health reporter for The California Report. Mina’s award-winning stories have included on-the-scene reporting of the 2014 Napa earthquake and a series on gun violence in Oakland.

Her work has been recognized by the Radio Television Digital News Association, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association.

Mina grew up in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Oak Park, CA. She lives in Napa.

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