Ioan Grillo

When Mexican authorities recaptured the infamous Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, President Enrique Pena Nieto tweeted “Mission Accomplished.” But the truth is far darker: Guzman is just one kingpin in a sprawling network of criminal fiefdoms that extend from the streets of Juarez in Mexico to the favelas in Brazil and the slums of Jamaica. In his newest book, “Gangster Warlords: Drug Dollars, Killing Fields and the New Politics of Latin America,” veteran journalist Ioan Grillo goes to the front lines of the drug war to learn how it’s changing and what can stop it.

Guests:
Ioan Grillo, journalist; author of "Gangster Warlords: Drug Dollars, Killing Fields and the New Politics of Latin America" and "El Narco"

  • EIDALM

    Capturing El Capo Guzman is just a show in the failed war on drugs U S policy ,wont make any difference in the drug trade ,he is just one guy with thousands who gladly take over…While the U S population makes only 5% of the world population ,Americans use 60% of illicit drugs produced world wide….The solution to the rampant drug use in the U S is to decriminalize drug use and treat addicts as patients and offer them treatment for their addiction, ,that also will have a side benefit which is to reduce the U S prison population which by far highest in the world ,and reduce the breaking of American families when breadwinners are send to prison for drug use…..By decriminalizing drug use all the Mexican and Latin American drugs cartels will go out of business.

  • EIDALM

    Bill Clinton NAFTA is the main reason for the rise of the Mexican drug trade and drug war when it let to mass unemployment of Mexican workers when it cause the demise of near all family owned small farms and small business .,it also led to the mass immigration to the U S.

    • Kurt thialfad

      Are you suggesting we should not control our borders?

      So why did the Mexican government approve the treaty if it would harm their farmers’ jobs?

  • EIDALM

    Bill Clinton NAFTA is the main reason for the rise of the Mexican drug trade and drug war when it led to mass unemployment of Mexican workers when it cause the demise of near all family owned small farms and small business .,it also led to the mass immigration to the U S…NAFTA also caused the loss of million jobs in the U S .

    • Kurt thialfad

      NAFTA is unconstitutional, because a treaty requires a 2/3rd vote of the Senate. NAFTA passed with a simple majority.

    • Robert Thomas

      Stick to physics.

  • EIDALM

    The prohibition of booze in the early last century ,led to the rise of the mafia and gangs like Al Capone with extreme violence and bloodshed ,it also led to the death of thousands of people who drank illicit poisonous liquids ,like wood alcohol ,just like what is happening today when addicts consume street drugs that often tainted with toxic substances …..Decriminalizing drugs will end the death and violence ,just as decriminalizing alcohol did by taking illicit profit out of it…..

  • Kurt thialfad

    Blaming the drug user (in the US) for the rise of Latin America-based drug cartels is much like blaming the rape victim for proliferation of rapists.
    Or blaming the patient for catching the disease.

    • jimjamgol

      that’s not the same thing at all. people don’t get attacked and become drug addicts by force in the USA , well at least not the majority of addicts . They have a willing role in using at least for the first time they use. This is a totally absurd comparison

  • Wendy Muse Sinek

    I just heard your guest refer to the favelas in Rio as “ghettos.” Come on Mr. Grillo, you are more educated and aware than that. #callthemfavelas http://catcomm.org/call-them-favelas/

  • Ben Rawner

    I have heard that heroin use is on the rise. Is heroin being smuggled into the US through these established trafficking routes or is it coming through a different way?

  • 1PeterDuMont2STARALLIANCE8

    Many thanks to Mr. Grillo for the enormous courage implicit in his important work, and to KQED-Forum for the courage to give him and his message proper public exposure.

  • Skip Conrad

    I don’t think granting asylum enmass to Latin America refugees is the answer. It’s just kicking the can down the road.

  • Cedric Thomas

    To what extent are countries coordinating, pooling resources and working together as a unified force to deal with or eradicate these warlords?

  • Robert Thomas

    Crime and corruption exist everywhere. But Asia, Africa and Latin America are ruled by crime fiefdoms. Look at the map:

    “What Were The Least (And Most) Corrupt Countries In 2015?”
    By Bill Chappell
    The Two-Way
    National Public Radio, January 27, 2016
    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/27/464586586/what-were-the-least-and-most-corrupt-countries-in-2015

    Where are the great, murderous crime cartels and warlords of Anglophone Canada and Francophone Quebec?

    None exist. Even during American Prohibition, Canadian suppliers of alcohol to the United States didn’t wreck Canadian political institutions.

    The source of Iberian America’s violent feudal fiefdoms is its failed Iberian society, its failed Iberian culture and failed Iberian religion.

    Corruption of social structure is endemic to the human condition. It was so in Europe, from Edinburgh to Constantinople and From Saint Petersburg to Seville, as well, until the advent of the Christian Reformation. This reaction against a corrupt Roman Church along with parallel creation of practical commercial institutions such as the Hanseatic League that encouraged an individual’s TRUST in civil institutions of government – rather than merely among clan or tribe – set Northern Europe on a novel road of increasing transparency in its civil institutions that has careened through history to today, where Denmark is the most transparent, least corrupt state on Earth.

    Cataclysms and horror are NOT precluded by this social construct, as we see in twentieth century Europe. But the civil institutions persisted through Nazi Germany and through the fascist nightmare suffered by the only other society that institutionalized cross-clan TRUST, Japan.

  • gez devlin

    Very interesting discussion, thank you. Senor Grillo knows much about ‘las calles narco,’ & the supply side of the equation… green rivers flowing south, white ones al norte.Chat w/ las cambistas (money-changers) at any Central American border crossing for a good intro. into el mundo-narco.

    The root to reducing the coca-blood lies on the demand side.
    Post-prohibition & legalization will go a long way to shifting the power
    from the warlords to pharma; but that will not cure the demand. Why do people
    consume drugs in the first place?

    There is a wide cross section of reasons, from positive to negative,
    and some societies are darker than others, so pop-a-pill & escape –
    prescribed drug addiction exceeds illegal drug addiction. In time, Big Pharma
    will take the reins and run the whole show, but at some point, society may want
    to ask, ‘how come we got so many junkies!?’

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