Kathryn Ma

Kathryn Ma was a partner at a law firm when she decided to leave the profession and pursue her dream to be a writer. Her debut novel, “The Year She Left Us,” follows the lives of three generations of Asian-American women. When Ari, the adopted teenage daughter, insists on tracing her roots back in China, it forces her Chinese-American family in San Francisco to confront their own issues of identity and acceptance. Kathryn Ma joins us to talk about writing, her own mixed heritage and assimilation.

Guests:
Kathryn Ma, author of "The Year She Left Us" and San Francisco-based fiction writer. Her previous book was "All That Work and Still No Boys."

  • jurgispilis

    The Chinese foreign adoption phenomenon is so interesting. The overwhelming majority are girls. Why is that? A combination of China’s one child policy and a cultural preference for boys – they are cheaper. But when boys grow up and seek spouses, they will all be in America, Australia, the UK. This will be interesting.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor