(Krissy Clark/KQED)

Governor Jerry Brown says he can meet a federal court order to reduce the state prison population by more than 9,600 inmates without releasing prisoners to the streets. Brown’s plan spends $315 million next year to push inmates to private prisons and detention facilities in and out of the state. But the plan faces a lot of opposition from other California Democrats, who say the plan does nothing to address the causes of the overcrowding crisis. Senate leader Darrell Steinberg has penned an alternate proposal which asks for a three-year extension of the court deadline, in exchange for investing an extra $200 million annually for rehabilitation, drug and mental health treatment, with the aim of reducing the number of California prisoners. We discuss the plans.

Guests:
Darrell Steinberg, California State Senate president pro tem
Senator Bob Huff, California State Senate minority leader representing California's 29th District, which includes parts of Orange, San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties

  • susansrwc

    I think we want rehabilitation, not training for recidivism. Is the Senator listening to himself.

  • Sanfordia113

    why is nobody talking about building more prisons? Clearly a need for more, not less prison beds.

    • MattCA12

      Build the walls higher.

  • amyj1276

    Why is it that Sen. Steinberg seems to be the only person in the legislature who has common sense and is able to think long-term and strategically?

  • Ginny Bahr

    a lot of these inmates don’t have a fighting chance- getting out of prison with felony convictions limiting their ability to get employment (ban the box), a back log of child support preventing their ability to get a driver’s license, limited education the list goes on and on. How about investing money into real change in the system they are walking out into? Otherwise it will be a steeper climb than anyone is really paying attention to.

    • Sanfordia113

      or how about death penalty for 3-strikers.

      • Ginny Bahr

        wow really?

        • Sanfordia113

          absolutely

          • Ginny Bahr

            well as they mentioned on air, they all eventually get out. If your solution is kill them all you may want to be careful your own anger doesn’t put you in their bed one day.

          • Sanfordia113

            I hold no anger. Why should innocent people be subjected to terror by fuzzheads with nothing better to do than plot the destruction of civilization?

  • amyj1276

    Under SB 678, we ARE tracking people, and there are more scientific evaluations going on now than ever before.

  • RSA

    I believe the courts have already found that moving inmates far from family, friends, and legal counsel is unconstitutional. So, if CA manages to proceed with this approach, it will cost of money. First to move the inmates. Second, by robbing money from evidence-based rehab programs. Third, by having to meet the inevitable and justified court challenge. Fourth, to move those inmates back. Gov Brown’s approach is cruel, expensive, and unrealistic.

    • Sanfordia113

      When a criminal commits a felony, they deserve no rights. Commit multiple felonies, they don’t deserve to live.

  • utera

    It isn’t just violent criminals. I think its been overlooked but car theft is getting ridiculous in the bay area. Just go to a site like crimereports and just zoom in and out on the map, set the time period to a reasonable amount of time or just sign up for alerts and just watch the cars stolen/recovered alerts and locations roll in, my friend had his car stolen recently and the cop he spoke to said it was up to 30 incidents a day in san jose alone. Just calculate the economic damage from this and you can see just a few of these people out on the streets going from car to car is going to cost far more in terms of damage to society than it will cost to just lock them up.
    Like it or not we just have to eat the cost at this point, California is just reaping the costs that come with being soft with illegal immigration, like it or not much crime is related to having a population who is unaccountable and lives below the radar, never mind the fact that this population undercuts wages on the low end, effectively imported scab labor which just ends up pushing up crime from poverty.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor