videogame

Video game consoles like the Xbox and PlayStation have long ruled the gaming world. But the increasing popularity of smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices is shaking up the industry. As game developers from around the world gather this week in San Francisco for their annual conference, we look at the future of video games.

Guests:
Adam Sessler, executive producer of games content at Revision3, and longtime television host on G4, TechTV and ZDTV
Nick Earl, senior vice president and general manager of Electronic Arts All Play

  • Ambulamus

    If only they would stop making games almost exclusively for escapists, and make a game that has some connection with the real world and practical concerns, I might get into gaming. There is a whole swathe of society who has never embraced gaming because of its preposterous fixation on gruesome violence against aliens, soldiers and zombies. It doesn’t help that violent games cause people to become so less compassionate in life.

    Religion is also an escapist activity that makes people less compassionate. See here:
    http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2012/04/30/religionandgenerosity/

    • Chemist150

      Could you be more specific? What are some examples of “practical concerns” that might make a good game?

      EQII had great crafting where you could make armor, weapons, potions, scrolls, for other players. It’s conceivable that you’d not have to do much killing at all. I spent time buying supplies from the market, crafting items and selling them on the market at a profit. I made a few platinum before reaching level 10.

      • Ambulamus

        How about a video game wherein someone falls on the tracks at a subway station and the goal is to help save them before getting smooshed yourself?

    • jmkqed1@yahoo.com

      I am truly disappointed with the direction of where the video gaming industry is going. Instead of focusing on story depth, plot, and character development, they’re concentrating more with family oriented, action, multi-player, and or social-mediacentric games. My favorite video game series is called Genso Suikoden(I – V), which was a emotionally resonant RPG filled with themes of betrayal, family, race, and valor. It was also the most ethnically diverse video games series I’ve come across as it has over 120 characters. Due to poor marketing strategy, it will probably meet a very slow death and we will be left with games devoid of all the rich qualities that attracted me to video games.

      here’s a link to the intro:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_f4eGQ9MIWM

      • Ambulamus

        I want games that follow the example of South Park: A new experience every week in direct response to real world events. This could prove shallow, but it would at least be entertaining.

        But I agree that the general shallowness of modern games is pathetic. It is rather like modern pørnögraphy.

      • Kaela PerLee

        Obviously you haven’t been paying attention to the last year of the video game industry. Between thatgamecompany’s Journey and Telltale Games’ The Walking Dead winning nearly every Game of the Year award for 2012, DICE and GDC have focused on discussing expanding narrative in games. Both games demonstrate that great story telling in games is possible and that players want it, whether it be traveling to a mountain top with players from all over the world via communicating through chirping or by making hard choices as you attempt to protect a little girl in a world gone to hell. Play these games, and I guarantee that you’ll have more hope for the industry.

  • Matt Small

    Ambulamus, your view of video games is woefully narrow. Just as with movies, and literature, and television, modern video games explore a wide variety of experiences. They can be violent, yes, or scary, but also hilarious, sentimental, mind-bending, thought-provoking, silly, even transcendent. Here are just a very few examples.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSRIlwXDBB4

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQNagqH6mO4

  • Tom Baker

    I’m wondering if the commenters could speak to the morality of freemium games, with their reliance on addiction models to make money?

  • Chemist150

    I’m still a PC gamer. I’m not going to play games on my phone but I do play PS3 games but they’re usually things like Pixel Junk, Plants Vs. Zombies….

    I’m still waiting for a real MMORPG, Everquest set the standard IMO with factions and languages where WOW dumbed it down and focused on combat and introduced battlegrounds in a good way. The things I remember most is with Everquest PVP at low levels. With my level 16 enchanter, I was able to hunt PVP in agro zones where I had to learn the language if I wanted to hear people shouting to get a team together to eliminate me. I also remember a dark elf, who had defected to the other side and leveled by only hunting other dark elves but maintained faction as not to lose his own city faction to make hunting easier. EQII made travel too easy.

    Bring back faction and languages to MMORPG please.

  • jmkqed1@yahoo.com

    I am truly disappointed with the direction of where the video gaming industry is going. Instead of focusing on story depth, plot, and character development, they’re concentrating more with family oriented, action, multi-player, and or social-mediacentric games. My favorite video game series is called Genso Suikoden(I – V), which was a emotionally resonant RPG filled with themes of betrayal, family, race, and valor. It was also the most ethnically diverse video games series I’ve come across as it has over 120 characters. Due to poor marketing strategy, it will probably meet a very slow death and we will be left with games devoid of all the rich qualities that attracted me to video games.

    here’s a link to the intro:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v

  • HZLR

    When did you stop giving out the phone number over the air? I wanted to chime in on this, but I never heard the number and I’m not normally out and about listening to forum, so I didn’t have it saved in my (non-smart)phone.

    Anyway,
    I feel that a large segment of video games has been left out of the conversation. The discussion always seems to define video games as either being console/pc games or as mobile/online/phone games. As someone who has over time owned a Gameboy, Gameboy color, GBA, DS, 3DS, PSP and PS Vita, I am very confused about why portable gaming (for lack of a better word) is never discussed.

    Yes, the amount of console games I purchase has decreased. That is in very large part due to the fact that I am now out of school and working, and my commute leaves little time at home for playing console games.

    However, the amount of portable games I purchase has /increased/, as I now have an income that allows me to buy more games and I spend a lot of time on my portable gaming systems while I’m on the (non-wifi-enabled-so-not-good-for-internet-requiring-pc-games-I-could-otherwise-play-on-my-laptop) train to and from work.

    I have no interest in mobile games, because portable games are just as convenient if you’re on the go and on average portable games are much, much better than mobile games. Having an extra piece of hardware to carry around is no problem for me, for as a chick I almost always have a bag it can easily fit into. The only advantage I can think of for mobile/facebook games is the social aspect (if one likes that sort of thing), but when it means weaker stories, worse graphics, being constantly badgered to purchase in-game items, and, in facebook’s case, many games requiring you to have dozens of friends playing the same software before certain features can be unlocked, it truly does not appeal to me.

    In short: Portable games seem like an obvious middle ground between console and mobile games, yet they are almost never part of the conversation, and this fact confuses me greatly.

  • Mac Senour

    wow, Adam couldn’t be more wrong. The biggest disruption will NOT be what Microsoft does with the next BOX. No question it will be Ouya and the Game Stick, two consoles that cost under $100 and will eat the low hanging fruit of non-hard core gamers market that used to go to Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft and even mobile.

    I’m not saying games on those consoles will be better, I’m saying that they’ll appeal to the cheap gamer who doesn’t want to spend $500 on a console, and $60 a game.

    Side note: EA as a mobile leader? Ya kidding me? What game have they released on mobile that didn’t already exist on another platform? That’s like saying a dog on a leash is a leader.

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