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California would ban smoking indoors for people living in townhouses, condos, apartments and other attached units under a bill introduced by state Assembly member Marc Levine. The San Rafael Democrat says he wants to protect the one-third of Californians who live in multi-unit complexes, and who may be forced to breathe secondhand smoke from their neighbors. If approved, it would be the strictest anti-smoking law in the country. We’ll talk to Levine and an opponent of the idea.

Guests:
Marc Levine, assemblyman representing District 10, which covers Marin County and Southern Sonoma County
Debra Carlton, senior vice president of public affairs for the California Apartment Association

  • Steve Wilkes

    Time for everyone to switch to e-cigarettes then. Hopefully Mr Levine would not want to include these in his bill. It could be a problem though if the FDA do reclassify and regulate e-cigarettes as tobacco products even though they contain no tobacco.

    The bill prohibits smoking of other tobacco products as well – I guess the word smoking leaves some wriggle room. You don’t smoke e-cigarettes – you vape them.

  • Beth Grant DeRoos

    Would the courts uphold this type of law if it were forced upon someone who is now living in a place they are buying or have bought?

    What about someone who is vegan and dislikes the unhealthy smell of the person BBQ’ing meat next door on the patio? Or the person who dislikes the smell of the diesel engine his neighbors vehicle emits, bearing in mind vehicle pollution is a much bigger health issue and effects many more people each day.

    As it is rental property owners can already charge a larger deposit if you have a pet or are a smoker because of the residue smoke leaves behind on walls, drapes, carpet etc.

    P.S. I have never smoked.

    • tkejlboom

      Good point, but what about the people that purchased the condos around the smoker? In basic terms, the smoker is polluting the neighboring properties with toxic chemicals.

      There are already restrictions on the particulate emissions on vehicles. If you’re not certain why we did that: http://www.npr.org/2013/01/18/169708763/beijing-grapples-with-record-air-pollution
      I’m not aware of any studies indicating health effects from the smell of cooking meat. There are studies demonstrating that patio grillers should be restricted because they have a tendency to inadvertently BURN DOWN their neighbors homes.

      • Beth Grant DeRoos

        BBQ produces SMOKE which doesnt stay in the area its being cooked. And When meat is cooked at high temperatures, amino acids react with creatine to form heterocyclic amines, which are thought to cause cancer.

      • Valek Frost

        there in lies the flaw in this, purchased condos AROUND the smoker, meaning that said smoker was there beforehand you cant move in next to someone who’s been there and expect everything to all of a sudden conform to the way that you like things

    • chrisnfolsom

      I agree to a certain extent although because you cannot draw a line doesn’t mean you can’t make some decisions, or have protections. There are plenty of people who don’t like rock music, but live next to loud apartment neighbors – there is a sound limit though. Perhaps there needs to be a limitation. I would be pissed if I came home to my apartment and my neighbors were always smoking outside the door – could I open my window out front and suck in that smoke? Is that MY problem, do I have to move, or can I ask them – with the law behind me to stop, move their location away from my door, or find some other apartment where this is not a problem? Just asking…

  • Jon Gold

    My greatest peeve against smokers is not so much the smoke, but the BUTTS! Deal with your cigarette butts smokers!!! Those end up lining the basin of the bay, I see them on every beach, on trails in Yosemite, everywhere! Why? It’s a bad habit and smokers seem to subconsciously throw their butts in denial!? There was a brief campaign a couple of years ago. And what is the best way to rid of butts?

    • Kristine Magnuson

      Most people who toss their butts don’t seem to recognize the environmental impact of dropping them everywhere (or else don’t care).

      • Valek Frost

        of everything else in the world that is improperly disposed of cigarette butts are the problem….ok sure, look up the pacific gyre garbage patch

        • Adam

          Yes Valek, there’s more than one problem.
          Also, you’re probably imagining that gyre is an “island”, which it certainly is not. It’s much more sinister.

    • James Miller

      well, if it becomes illegal for millions of people to smoke indoors where their ashtrays are, expect to see more butts on the ground outside.

    • chrisnfolsom

      I believe littering is illegal – butt or not – especially in a National Park.

    • LibertyTreeBud

      I have never thrown a butt anywhere out of doors. I ‘dress’ the butt by rolling it to empty the paper of residual tobacco then roll it into a ball and pack it on my person or purse. Everyone should do that. I would defy and ignore any bullcrap about smoking in my ‘place’ unless they were willing to pay the rent for me. However, I would do it so that I wouldn’t get caught by the Nazi-enforcers.

  • Jens Emil Ravn Nielsen

    Yes!
    Ban smoking everywhere! It is gross and unhealthy for those around you.
    It is a foolish habit that has zero benefit to an individual, though
    some would argue stress, but it hurts the environment and leads to
    prolific litterers. No smoking in public spaces, no smoking in any
    rental situations, and a mandatory full disclosure for all automobile
    sales.

    • That should be the target ,when smoking drugs is illegal, so should tobacco be but then the govt will lose on taxes. As of now how much of tobacco settlement money has been used for smoke free environment is anybody’s guess. it has been used for something else.

  • As a former smoker, I support Marc Levine’s legislation that would ban smoking in multiunit residences like apartments and condominiums. I recently moved into an apartment building in Sacramento where I later discovered that the tenant in the unit below me smokes heavily. I’ve had to result to installing carbon-charchol filters on my vents to reduce the smell and purchase very expensive air filtration units to eliminate second hand smoke that rises into my dwelling. The situation is made worse by the apartments sub-standard ventilation and shoddy construction to convert the multi-room apartments into studios and single bedroom dwellings.

    Smokers that live in multi-unit housing should have to walk 20 feet or more away from open windows and doors of the complex to respect non-smokers that live near or above them.

    Thank you for making California a healthier smoke-free state!

    • Sanfordia113

      You have identified a huge problem across California – that developers have been allowed to subdivide units without installing sufficient insulation between units to give the units equivalent privacy to living in detached housing. This is a requirement in many countries. We should accept no less here.

    • Valek Frost

      good idea lets force them all onto the street so when people walk by they can breathe even more polluted air

      • Adam

        That’s not legal in a lot of places.

    • LibertyTreeBud

      I’d get on the building codes and planning boards and make it clear that ventilation is critical for health. Plagues in one apartment could spread just like smoke. Radiation does the same thing. Put the hate and energy to fight towards the building of crap housing ventilation systems.

  • Monsieur Oblong

    This fellow Michael is interviewing keeps telling us how many people die of second-hand smoke every year. Can he tell us how many people die of second-hand smoke that seeps thru walls? 0? Get real. I’m not a smoker, but this is absolutely ridiculous.

    • TrolleyMolly

      It doesn’t seep thru walls. It gets under doors and thru vents and windows.

      • LibertyTreeBud

        This doesn’t say much for the schlock building of these apartment units or the ill fitting doors. If one unit is filled with sick germs the vents help to spread it to everyone in the building.OMG that is the pits.

    • LibertyTreeBud

      I wish those enforcers would feel this strongly about the aluminum that we breath in from geo-engineering the atmosphere.

  • disqus_o2bx2aU16E

    What about marijuana smoke?

  • Guest

    Thank you, Mr. Levine. Smokers act like second class citizens. They should be treated as such. CORRECTION: I should say “second rate” citizens, not second class citizens.

    • James Miller

      Smokers act like second class citizens? What does that even mean? “I don’t vote because I’m a smoker?”

      • Guest

        Thanks for asking. Let me be specific: 1. Smokers are de facto consumers of poisonous products developed by a malicious industry which profits from the distribution, marketing and sales of products which have been unequivocally scientifically demonstrated to addict and kill. 2. Smokers seem to feel entitled to their addiction and tend to willingly pursue it regardless of its effects on others. How does it feel to be a human being who couldn’t pass a smog test? 3. Smokers smell bad. Your clothes stink and you don’t care. 4. Smokers litter. Everywhere I go I see cigarette butts, cigarette cartons, cigarette packs, cigarette lighters tossed aside with no concern. 5. Smokers cost society millions, probably billions, of dollars in health care costs. These attributes taken together suggest to me that smoking presents a scourge to our society and I am in favor in taking steps to shame, disincentivize and criminalize the habit. That, sir, is what I mean.

        • Valek Frost

          what reality do you live in?

      • Guest

        I have used the wrong term, here. I should say “second rate” citizens…not second class.

    • chrisnfolsom

      I agree with smoking limitations, but not how it’s worded here – smoking IS an elective or limited activity (not an inherent right) that should not be pushed upon others who don’t want exposure, but does not make anyone “second class” – we don’t have a class system in America…or at least we don’t call it that šŸ˜‰

      • Guest

        Read what I wrote. I didn’t say smokers ARE second class citizens. I said they *act* that way. Actions carry consequences. I’m not blowing smoke here, they are.

        • chrisnfolsom

          Then anyone who consumes is a second hand citizen as they are mostly at the will of the producers of products which all have some form of waste or negative effects – I agree smoking is ridiculous as is drinking and over eating, but education and public pressure/change to make better choices is preferable to “laws” – unless their behavior can show some reasonably direct impact on others. We are talking grey areas of course and we all have our banners to wave on what is important or not, choice or not, affects others or not – not to mention children…. But things are getting so polarized now it is ridiculous and paralyzing…..

          • Guest

            I would argue that smoking has negative externalities which far exceed the example of overeating. (I hold Coca-Cola corporation with barely less contempt than Phillip Morris.) See my response to James Miller below.

  • Chemist150

    Banning smoking in rental apartments is one thing because there is a lot of transitory traffic but banning smoking within owned property is another thing and should not be allowed to move forward.

    • Valek Frost

      what if you’ve had the same apartment for years? whats transitory about that? if you have should you still be allowed to smoke in your own home?. people that paint any issue with a broad strokes need their head examined

    • LibertyTreeBud

      US INC, in cahoots with creeps from hell are working with sweated brow to remove private property from the world. We’ll all be renting from those from ‘on high’. I guess by then our ‘brain implants’ will forbid us to smoke, just breathe in the chem-trails and radioactive air.

  • Kristine Magnuson

    I disagree with the caller who felt this was unfairly targeting low-income tenants (the ones who smoke). It’s worth recognizing that this would help to improve the health of more low-income tenants, who rarely have another option. Just as Mr. Levine has said.

    • mr. x

      So you’re going to tell the poor how to live, what to do, what’s good for them. How very patronizing of you. On the other hand, maybe EVEN THE POOR should be able to decide how to live their own live?

    • Valek Frost

      how many low income neighborhoods have you lived in? seeing as I live in one right now I can tell you that it’s much more hazardous and a health risk being outside than sitting inside

  • My community already implements this and it works! There are designated smoking areas outside away from the buildings. Of course, there are some that do not oblige all the time, but majority of smokers seem to use the designated areas. Having a baby, dog, and asthma myself, it is so nice to be able and open my window again for cool, fresh air and not have smoke filter in.

    • LibertyTreeBud

      Watch out, there may come a time when your loud crying baby, shedding with the latest vaccine and your wheezing and barking dog are relegated to the roof. šŸ™‚

  • jayson

    Thank You Mr Levine for classifying on air the difference between cancer related tobacco smoke and non-carcinogous cannibis smoke. smoke is bad regardless especially for asthma sufferers etc, but its important to note marijuana smoke is much less harmful overall than cigarette smoke, namely packaged brands. thank you. Long Live Forum and Krasny! J-Livermore

  • James Miller

    Anti-smoking in California has progressed to a religion. No one has ever
    comitted suicide by locking themselves in a garage and smoking a
    cigarette. Running a car in a closed garage IS an effective way to kill
    yourself. Cars are FAR more toxic than cigarettes. Are we going to ban
    attached garages in condos and apartments? If I am a biker, should I be
    forced to breath my neighbour’s toxic car fumes?

    • Adam

      Maybe you haven’t noticed that cars and their emissions are highly regulated?

  • Sean

    I live in San Francisco. I don’t smoke indoors because I don’t want want to smell like smoke. But what about smoking on my back porch? My upstairs neighbor complains but I don’t want to walk down to the street to smoke

    • chrisnfolsom

      That is a tough situation, but do you believe it is your right to put smoke into your neighbors living space? Perhaps a schedule or something. Just as your upstairs neighbor has the right to do aerobics at 5:00am that would not be a very nice thing to do (personal experience – she went to another room thank gods..).

  • tkejlboom

    Yes!
    Besides potency, what is the difference between saying you can’t poison your neighbors with cigarette smoke and saying you can’t poison your neighbors with the externalities of a meth lab? Despite what the Tea Party says, law don’t exist only to protect people from their government. Laws also exist to protect people from other people.

    The targeting the poor is a strawman. 80% don’t smoke. For every smoker you can find inconvenienced by the law, I can find 4 “inconvenienced” by the smoker.

    • James Miller

      You assume smoking rates are uniform accross economic classes, which is not the case. At the $6k to $12k income range, the smoking rate is 34% — which means the majority of 2 person households at this income level have a smoker. The poor are also more likely to me in multi-unit housing. This law would disproportionately affect the poor.

  • ClaraT

    While I agree with the idea that people should be free to do
    what they want in their own homes, their rights end when their activity affects my health. No one has the ‘right’ to harm my health or my children’s health. Clean air = healthy air.

    Wood smoke has many of the same toxic and carcinogenic substances as cigarette smoke, and not only is the smoke not contained, it is actually directed out of the house into the neighborhood where it is breathed by multiple households. Currently, residents have no protection from neighbors who burn except on spare the air days. Wood smoke is harmful to health, and it is a huge contributor to wintertime air pollution. I applaud the efforts of Mr. Levine to protect people from secondhand cigarette smoke, but Iā€™d like to hear what he thinks about what should be done to mitigate wood smoke pollution and protect our health.

    See: http://familiesforcleanair.com for more information about wood smoke.

    • James Miller

      Do you drive? Cars are responsible for most of our urban air pollution.

      • chrisnfolsom

        And 30K+ deaths a year…

    • ClaraT

      Apples and oranges, James. I agree that we should work to reduce air pollution as much as possible, including car/truck/bus/factory/refinery pollution. The thing is, we don’t have to work on just one of these sources of pollution–we should work to reduce the harm and pollution from *all* of them.
      Wood smoke is a huge source of wintertime pollution in the Bay Area, and right now the rights of the polluters are considered more important than the rights of the rest of us to breathe the cleanest air possible. That stinks, both literally and figuratively.

  • anon

    said a CA assemblyman familiar with the negotiations, “now that we’ve solved all of CA’s other problems, we thought moving on to nonsense like this was a no-brainer.”

    • tkejlboom

      What kind of progress was he making on all of CA’s other problems?

  • chrisnfolsom

    Smoking does lessen the value of property and owners have a choice. To protecting neighbors is tough – I think there should be a way for challenged neighbors to request if there is a problem – big opening for abuse perhaps, but the right to clean air should trump the rights of others to influence others – why should moving be their only option? IT IS A VIOLATION of my (and others) rights to have to endure a neighbor who smokes – not through walls, but in front/back of their apartments, smoke wafting from window to window. We all have the right to be naked in certain places – which few have died from, but we have public decency rules limiting it – we are all limited in many ways – why is smoking any different especially in light of it’s proven negative health effects?

    • James Miller

      The nudity bans are silly too.

    • Valek Frost

      lol this is rich, do you not see the brownish yellow haze persistent in the sky? you want clean air? move to the country because it’s just not going to happen in a major city

      • chrisnfolsom

        there are limits to everything – there are apartments and condos in the country too – loud noise, partys, garbage, smoke and many things are electve and can affect others – why is smoking so sacrsanct in being limited and why must others move because of ones “need” for some habit or behavior that impacts others negatively – if you want to be excessive why dont YOU move to the country. I am glad I could enrich your day.

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    I hate smoking but this law will make it worse in my apt, not better. As it is, smokers in my building gather in front of it to smoke, and my windows are adjacent to the front door. So all their smoke now blows into my windows. However, if they smoke in their own apartments, that does not happen. In San Francisco, smokers cant smoke in common areas and are to remain 10 feet from the front door, but there is no one to enforce that despite my having written my landlord. My next door neighbor loves to get on cell phone and pace back and forth in front of my building. Again, the smoke comes into my windows, when it would not if he stayed in his place. So these laws have had the opposite effect for me – they drive the smoke from the smokers’ homes into mine.

    Take a look around san francisco: houses are often connected or built very closely together and right up to the sidewalk. Anyone with windows open to the front now gets a second hand dose.

    And yes, smokers end up in the bay, untreated, from washing into storm drains, to the tune of a quarter of a millions butts per year (see Baykeeper.org).

    • tickedoffamerican

      I suppose you counted the butts?

  • Hannah

    Actually outdoor smoking in apartments and condos should be banned first. (after all there is a 50 or 100 ft rule with public buildings) My neighbors porch is right next to my kitchen window. Her smoke comes into my house every half hour. Which means my kids and I cannot ventilate our house without living with her second hand smoke.(often Im in another room, and come into a kitchen and play area for kids full of smoke) Lucky for her, however her apartment stays smoke free!

  • Freebler

    I agree w/ M Krasny: Big Brother.

  • Sanfordia113

    If only they would implement a flatulence ban! (sorry, couldn’t hold in the urge to let that one loose)

  • RCCA

    I’m all in favor of a smoking ban in apartments, multi-unit complexes. Smokers can no longer puff away oblivious to the detrimental effects of their addictions on others, even if they couldn’t care less about their own health. As a person who is allergic to cigarette smoke and has a heavy smoker neighbors downstairs, I applaud the efforts of the Marc Levine. My neighbor claims she is not smoking in her apartment, but she’s lying. So even if I manage to prove it to the management, what can they actually do about it without a law?
    Your health is precious and deserves to be protected.

    • topgun966

      Get over yourself. I am allergic to the chemical in cheap perfumes. I am not going to try to get them banned. I LIVE MY OWN LIFE.

      • RCCA

        I’m not banning cigarettes, just don’t force me to live in your smoke filled life.

    • Valek Frost

      No one really is allergic to smoke. Many people insist that they are allergic to smoke created by cigarettes or cigars, but the truth is that they have having an allergy-like reaction due to other health complications. Understanding exactly why you feel like you are having allergy attack when around a smoker is the key to understanding how to prevent symptoms in the future.

      Smoke technically is not an allergen, but an irritant. This explains most people feel no relief when they take antihistamine allergy after exposure to smoke. The key to avoiding the problems caused by cigarette smoke is determining what type of sensitivity you have and how best to treat it.

      He could be sensitive to smoke
      Two Main Types of Smoke Sensitivity

      In order to truly treat the reaction to smoke, you have to identify what sort of sensitivity you are experiencing. There are two forms of smoke sensitivity:

      Smoke Aggravating Underlying Allergies: your body is weakened by smoke and begins reacting to all the tiny bits of pollen, dust and dander that usually would not have been a problem.

      Vasomotor Rhinitis: this is a condition that has all the same symptoms as allergic rhinitis (or nasal allergies), but cannot be treated by antihistamine allergy medicine.

      • Adam

        If its really just an irritant, how does that make secondhand smoke any less of an issue?

      • RCCA

        Sounds like you might know something, but actually not. What’s the difference if the smoke causes an allergic reaction or exacerbates an allergy when the bigger issue is that secondhand smoke is a known cause of cancer? No difference.

    • LibertyTreeBud

      Well, if the cigarette laws are as enforced as the many aged gun laws that were not enforced, on purpose so we would be here now freeking out over a nut in Connecticut, you’ll still be all bummed out over your smoking neighbor.

  • Guest

    As a townhome owner with a smoker next door who typically uses their back patio (which is attached to our own) to do so, I empathize with this proposed bill. It’s incredibly frustrating when I open my windows only to smell smoke from the neighbors wafting into our rooms (including that of our child). It’s even worse when we’re dining on our patio and they’re huffing and puffing on the other side of the fence.

    • Valek Frost

      here’s an idea, try eating inside the house and unless you have only one window to open try opening another it’s called a crossbreeze

  • stacy

    I live in a condo with my husband and 2 year old daughter. My daughter was forced to smell the cigarette smoke and marijuana smoke from our neighbors since she was born. I feel very guilty to put her in an enviroment like this and I wish we could afford to buy a house. If this bill pass, it’d mean so much to my husband and I as parents and much more to my daughter as she would no longer be harmed from secondhand smoke.

    • tickedoffamerican

      Your daughter was not “forced” to smell cigarette smoke…..you and your husband “forced” her to live there…..so you should feel guilty!…..I guess if you moved next to a hog farm…and didn’t like the smell…you would get a politician to enact a law to remove the hog farmer and his hogs??

      • If the hog farm was there when I moved there, it’d be my fault. But when I moved to the condo, none of my neighbors smoked, then smokers moved in. I think it’s a tricky situation living in a condo or apts, everyone needs to respect other people’s living rights, smokers have their right to smoke and destroy their own health, I have no say about that. But I’d preferred them not to destroy other people’s health. Maybe it’s not fair to ask my neighbors not to smoke in their condos, but it’d be nice to have smoke free condos, so when I am able to find the next home, I would be very clear on where to move to. And for you, where not to move to.

  • KL

    I heard this show on the radio yesterday and just have to have my say. First, I am not defending smoking, it is a disgusting habit. That said, I do believe people have a right to do what they want with their bodies as long as they are not hurting others in the process.

    Nowadays, admitting you smoke is worse than admitting you beat your kids. Their is plenty of documentation showing the dangers of smoking and as callers pointed out smokers are either in denial or hopelessly addicted, or have a death wish, or all the above.

    While I’m not defending smokers, I would like to defend peoples right to do what they want in their homes without the intrusion of SOCIAL ENGINEERING BUSYBODIES like state Assembly member Marc Levine.

    Levine is likely part of some local bay area agenda 21 “green coalition” whose plan is to remove all our god given rights to freedom and freewill and have us living in tiny 300sf micro apartments eating soylent green while our Elite overlords rule over us with an iron fist.

    If Mr. Levine really cared about your health (love how these guys always say they have to take away our freedom to keep our children safe, or to save us from the “terrorist”) he would propose a bill to outlaw Fluoride, a known carcinogen and worse, in our water supply, GMO’s in our food, mercury in our toxic vaccines, smart meters on our homes, and Chemtrails in our sky. But, he dosn’t care about that, all he cares about is falling all over himself to avoid steping on the property rights of the landlord association Forum had representing the opposition on the show.

    • LibertyTreeBud

      I enjoy a cigarette once in a while, it does taste good and I enjoy it. I can smoke less that one cigarette a day or one cigarette a year, as I can not become addicted. So, on those rare occasions I don’t expect anyone to bugger me about my smoking and if they do why I would tell them to shove off, oh, but wait, it IS all about the fine$. That and catering to the commies that run the state.

  • Kathy S.

    I own a condo and have the misfortune to live above a smoker who smokes on his balcony rather than stink up his own unit. If I want to enjoy my own balcony or just leave the door open to get some fresh air, I’m forced to inhale a toxic poison that is known to cause cancer and other serious illnesses. Ten years ago, my 4 year old cat died of lymphoma, which is correlated to cigarette smoke. My current cats like to lie in the sun on the balcony, but risk a similar fate due to his smoke. Is this fair? Why should my cats and I be forced to inhale a known toxin? Who is going to protect us if not the government? This is not Big Brother, this is the legitimate interest of the state in a serious public health issue. I fully support this legislation and think it is long overdue.

    • KL

      Kathy, I suggest you have a conversation with your neighbor and explain your situation and see if you two can come to some sort of accommodation. I would also like to point out to you that your cat’s may be getting sick from the chemtrails in your air, the microchip implant in their body, the smart meter on your wall, the quality of food you are buying them or the fluoride if you are giving them tap water to drink. I will also point out to you that while big brother anti-smoking rules may be what you desire now, what will you say when they come up with a new rule about what foods you can eat or limiting access to self defense, privacy, vitamins or health care therapies for example. You say anti-smoking legislation is in the interest of the state, but guess what Kathy, the state dosn’t care about you!

      • chrisnfolsom

        enough about the chemtrails…. jez, there is little way yo show cause and affect – I can “think” of a million things. Regarding the smoke – you should not have to endure it – sorry to all the smokers – if a neighbor complains you must come to some agreement – or you should. I know you smokers feel persecuted, but we have moved on as a society on many other behaviors – now smoking. I wish we could all be happy, but my right to clean air trumps yours to ingesting nicotine by burning tobacco in my vacinity.

    • Valek Frost

      wow that’s some magic smoke it can descend a whole floor in an open air environment. i’ll just leave this here “Cats have a higher incidence of lymphoma than dogs or humans. Genetic disposition is perhaps the strongest factor in developing lymphoma”

  • Much of this problem depends on the construction of the units. Permeability of adjoining walls and so forth. I’m glad they are trying to address this issue, but might be hard to do it with a law unless it can have a lot of local discretion for various situations. For instance some apartment complexes can have smoking areas and in some cases maybe an area could be in a person’s unit if it isn’t in an adjoining room to a neighbor. Maybe if there’s very good ventilation to the outside so the smoke leaves the building.

  • Guest

    Hey KQED moderators of this posting board, what happened to my post?

    Do you just plan to delete everyone’s post whose opinion is not politically correct?

    What’s the point of having a forum if you are going to exclude people who’s opinion you disagree with?

    My comment used the words Social Engineering, Agenda 21, and Nazi-like to describe the words and actions of Mr. Levine and his attempts to use big government to restrict peoples free will.

    I also stated that I thought smoking was a disgusting habit but I would take a smoker over more big brother control freak legislation any day!

    I also stated that if Mr. Levine really wanted to protect people he would do something about the high altitude Chemical and Biological trails daily covering our skies, the fluoride in our water, the GMO in our foods, mercury and other toxins in out of control vaccine schedules, EMF’s from smart meters…etc.

    If by chance, my original post was somehow deleted for technical reasons and not by your attempts to censor me, my apologies!

    Your words:

    “Please ensure that all comments adhere to our community guidelines. We reserve the right to edit or remove comments that do not follow these guidelines”

  • tickedoffamerican

    I am a smoker who started smoking when society as a whole thought it was “cool” to smoke. Do you know the main reason I don’t quit?…..It is because of these holier than thou politicians who choose to tax the heck out of cigarettes and say the tax is to encourage smokers to quit…but in all reality they don’t want anyone to quit….they just want the tax revenue and would be the first ones to complain if that additional revenue were to decline. On one hand, I begrudge every dime these parasites get from me…..but on the other hand due to the fact that smoking is not politically correct, and there are so many whiners and complainers who don’t have any life of their own so they choose to tell everyone else how to live their lives……I refuse to quit primarily because I do not like being told what to do. If it were my own decision and I was ready….I might quit……but keep telling me to quit?……I refuse to……So….you kool-aid drinkers keep believing what these politicians tell you when they say that they create laws to “protect” you……and someday every freedom you might have today…..will be taken away in the future…..just because someone out there who doesn’t like what you do will buy a politician who can pass a law to take away your freedom. There is something to be said about a society where it is legal to kill an unborn child……but getting to be illegal to sit down and enjoy a smoke……..Get a life and quit telling people how to live their own…

  • Steven Gaylord

    I recall years ago the very first ban was smoking in elevators. That was fine, but isn’t it getting a bit too ridiculous?

    • chrisnfolsom

      What is rediculous is that people dont care about others and get self rightouse – both ways. The fact that smokers say – “it doesnt seep through walls” and some nonsmokers are concerned about their cats gettin cancer in the back yard…. If it comes to LAW then what is the threshold for endangering someone, or creating allergic reaction (or irritation)? Its hard to say, but Irregardless the “dangers” – I just dont like rhe smell. Now I will tolerate smoking, but if I am on my porch and my neighbor want to smoke and the wind blows it in my direction I should have rights allowing myself and my guests to not have to endure that smoke – if you cannot accomodate that through public decency then legal protection will have to be used – a few asses on either side force the issue which is too bad.

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