New York legislators approved same-sex marriage on Friday, launching a weekend of euphoria and engagements among LGBT New Yorkers. What are the political implications for California, and for the nation?

Scott Shafer, reporter and host of KQED's The California Report
Ken Rudin, NPR's political junkie

  • George Pilis

    There is no right to get married. (If anyone can show Article and Section of the Constitution, I will stand corrected)  But of course one can pursue happiness whatever way one (legally) chooses. However, in order  for the State (not some flacky church) to issue you a marriage license, you need to meet the qualifications set by the State, much like you need to meet the qualifications to acquire a drivers license, or a contractors’ license or a license to practice medicine, or a license to sell alcoholic beverages or firearms.Current marriage license qualifications include: being of legal age, not already involved in an existing marriage, not a sibling or very close relative, not more than two persons involved, etc. And then there is the blood test. What if you fail the blood test?I personally believe, considering the high divorce rate, that the qualifications for issuance of a marriage license be made more stringent rather than more relaxed. But that’s just me.Gay marriage is not going to improve our divorce rates, but I join most others in betting that divorce rates will most assuredly only get worse. We know there will be fraud. And we know there will be immigration fraud. I favor comprehensive marriage reform. Let fix the whole problem.

  •  After read the article,I want to say: Marriage is the freedom of the individual,now that the law gives us right,and that to say we can married with any people that without crime. Support them.

  • George Pilis

    ” we can married with any people that without crime”.  I think that is an odd and very bizarre way to put it.  I don’t think getting married incorrectly can be a crime.

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