The #MeToo movement has shined a light on abuse and harassment in the workplace in almost every industry within the past year, but one industry that’s been glaringly quiet is the rap industry. So why isn’t Hip Hop having its own #MeToo moment?

Rap has traditionally been male dominated, not unlike many other industries. However, in the film and television industry, when a woman comes forward with allegations, she gains support from other male and females power players from within her industry. The same cannot be said for women who come forward with allegations against those in the rap industry. We see how gender dynamics play a role, but there’s more to it. Is it a matter of race? Or an issue of power structures?

SOURCES
Why Black Women Can’t Say #MeToo

Opinion | Russell Simmons, R. Kelly, and Why Black Women Can’t Say #MeToo

Op-Ed Contributor There’s an intersection in almost every hood that teaches young girls lessons about power, racism and sexism. In the projects, where I grew up, I had to pass it almost every day to get home from school.

Why the Music Industry Hasn’t Had Its #MeToo Moment

Why the Music Industry Hasn’t Had Its #MeToo Moment

When a man turns himself in to authorities for allegedly punching a woman in the face enough times to knock out her front teeth, there are various ways to respond. Claiming a conspiracy might be the most peculiar option to exercise.

The Long Struggle Against Sexual Harassment at Work

Before #MeToo: The Long Struggle Against Sexual Harassment at Work (with Interactive Timeline and Lesson Plan)

In October, the dam finally broke. That’s when multiple women, including female employees and actresses, began to accuse powerful film producer and studio executive Harvey Weinstein of explicit sexual harassment. The revelations came more than a year after Roger Ailes, the chairman of Fox News, was toppled following allegations of sexual misconduct, and just months since Fox News host Bill O’Reilly was forced out on similar charges.

Representations of the African American female body in urban rap videos

Can’t touch this! representations of the African American female body in urban rap videos

(1997). Can’t touch this! representations of the African American female body in urban rap videos. Popular Music and Society: Vol. 21, Cartographies of Sound, Noise, and Music at Century’ End, pp. 107-116.

Black Feminism and Third-Wave Women’s Rap

Black Feminism and Third-Wave Women’s Rap: A Content Analysis, 1996-2003

Scholars have argued that women’s rap lyrics can be located within a larger black feminist musical tradition whereby race, gender, and sexual politics are discussed in an empowering and self-defining manner. The emergence of third-wave women’s rap in the mid-1990s, however, challenged black feminist readings of the music; of particular concern were the messages around black female sexuality and womanhood.

Female Rape in the USA

No Title

No Description

Why Isn’t Hip Hop Having Its Own #MeToo Moment? 10 August,2018Annelise Wunderlich

Author

Annelise Wunderlich

Annelise is a documentary filmmaker, educator, and Youth Participation Manager at KQED. Her films have aired on national and regional public television outlets, and she teaches film studies at Diablo Valley College. She loves very spicy food, and traveling to places where people make it.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor