Social Media and Your Brain

Do a quick Google search on how social media affects your mood, and the results make it seem like all the social media platforms will plunge you into depression. Facebook shows everyone’s perfect life and exotic vacations. Expertly curated selfies abound on Instagram. But, if you look at the actual research, the results aren’t that simple.

All social media platforms are not created equal. The relationship between social media use and depression is complex, depending on what platform you use and how you use it — it can make you feel lonely and down, or it can make you feel more connected and supported. This is especially true with Snapchat. It’s pretty new to the research world, so it hasn’t been studied for that long. But, it may be that Snapchat affects your brain in a fundamentally different way.

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Learn More…

ARTICLE: Facebook Blues: How You Use the Site Can Make You Depressed, Say Research (KQED Science)

GUIDELINES: Feeling Lonely? Too Much Time On Social Media May Be Why (NPR)


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Is Social Media Making You Sick? 26 August,2019Derek Lartaud

Author

Derek Lartaud

Derek Lartaud came to the Bay Area after nearly five years of researching schizophrenia and diabetes at Yale University. Determined to tell visual stories, he’s worked for the BBC, Al Jazeera America, TIME, PBS, and the Center for Investigative Reporting. He has a bachelor’s degree in neuroscience and a master’s degree in journalism. When not holding a camera or editing a story, he’s trying to rebuild his 1969 Honda CL350.

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