Old-fashioned oatmeal cookies are as comforting as a warm hug. This sweet, chewy cookie recipe, with the added benefit of chocolate chips, is here to hug you.

I love a good oatmeal cookie, especially one that is chewy, slightly crisp on the edges, with a nice balance of sweet and savory. I also find them incredibly versatile, an ideal cookie to personalize to your own tastes. The most obvious addition to a plain oatmeal cookie would be plump, juicy raisins…but I know plenty of folks who won’t even be in the same room with a raisin. For those, I’d throw in some chocolate chips—my favorite embellishment. This recipe is my go-to, and as you can see, I’ve included the chocolate chips. But for the rest of you, if this doesn’t make your heart sing, I offer plenty of variations:

  • For plain oatmeal cookies, leave out the chocolate chips (seems obvious, right?).
  • For oatmeal-raisin cookies, swap out the chocolate chips for 1 cup raisins or dried currants.
  • For oatmeal-cranberry-white chocolate cookies, swap out the chocolate chips for 1 cup white chocolate chips and 1 cup dried cranberries.
  • For spiced oatmeal cookies, omit the chocolate chips and add 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon and 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg.
  • For oatmeal-chocolate chip-nut cookies, add 1/2 to 1 cup toasted chopped walnuts, pecans, or almonds to the dough when adding the chocolate chips.
Oatmeal-Chocolate Chip Cookies
Oatmeal-Chocolate Chip Cookies (Wendy Goodfriend)

Recipe: Oatmeal-Chocolate Chip Cookies

Makes about 3 1/2 dozen cookies

    Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at cool room temperature
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 (12-oz) bag bittersweet chocolate chips
    Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter, both sugars, and salt on medium speed until creamy. Add the eggs one at a time, beating until combined, then beat in the vanilla.
  3. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter, both sugars, and salt on medium speed until creamy.
    In a large bowl, using an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter, both sugars, and salt on medium speed until creamy. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Add the eggs one at a time, beating until combined.
    Add the eggs one at a time, beating until combined. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Then beat in the vanilla.
    Then beat in the vanilla. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  4. In another bowl, whisk together the flour and baking soda. Turn off the mixer, add the flour mixture to the butter mixture, then beat on low until combined. Stir in the oatmeal and chocolate chips.
  5. In another bowl, whisk together the flour and baking soda.
    In another bowl, whisk together the flour and baking soda. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Turn off the mixer, add the flour mixture to the butter mixture, then beat on low until combined.
    Turn off the mixer, add the flour mixture to the butter mixture, then beat on low until combined. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Stir in the oatmeal.
    Stir in the oatmeal. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Stir in the chocolate chips.
    Stir in the chocolate chips. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  6. Drop rounded tablespoonfuls of the dough onto the prepared baking sheets, spacing them about an inch apart. Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes, then use a metal spatula to transfer the cookies directly to wire racks to cool.
  7. Drop rounded tablespoonfuls of the dough onto the prepared baking sheets, spacing them about an inch apart.
    Drop rounded tablespoonfuls of the dough onto the prepared baking sheets, spacing them about an inch apart. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes, then use a metal spatula to transfer the cookies directly to wire racks to cool.
    Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes, then use a metal spatula to transfer the cookies directly to wire racks to cool. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Serve the Oatmeal-Chocolate Chip Cookies
    Serve the Oatmeal-Chocolate Chip Cookies (Wendy Goodfriend)
Christmas Cookies: Sweet and Chewy Oatmeal-Chocolate Chip Cookies 26 December,2017Kim Laidlaw

Author

Kim Laidlaw

Kim Laidlaw is a cookbook author, editor, food writer, producer, project manager, and baker who has been in the kitchen covered in flour since she was big enough to stir the biscuit dough. She has over 16 years of experience in book and online publishing, and a lifetime of experience in the kitchen.

Her first cookbook, Home Baked Comfort, was published in 2011; her second cookbook, Baby & Toddler On the Go, was published in April 2013; and her third cookbook, Williams-Sonoma Dessert of the Day, was published in October 2013.

She was the first blogger on KQED’s Bay Area Bites blog, which launched in 2005, and previously worked as a professional baker at La Farine French Bakery in Oakland, CA. She lives in Petaluma with her husband and their child, whom she cooks for everyday. Find out more at http://www.kimlaidlaw.com.

Author

Wendy Goodfriend

I am the Senior Interactive Producer for KQED Food. I have designed and produced food-related websites and blogs for KQED including Bay Area Bites; Check, Please! Bay Area;  Taste This; Jacques Pepin’s websites; Weir Cooking in the City and KQED Food. When I am not creating and managing food websites I am taking photos and video of Bay Area Life and designing online navigation systems. My professional education and training includes: clinical psychology, photography, commercial cooking, web design, information architecture and UX. You can find me engaged in social media on Twitter @bayareabites and on Facebook at Bay Area Bites. I can also be found photoblogging at look2remember.

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