Recipe video by Vic Chin

Even though kale still seems to be holding the spotlight in a decade-long love affair, when it comes to sautéed greens, I’m partial to collard greens. Likely because I grew up with them in Texas (plus my father hailed from West Virginia and Georgia, so southern food runs through my veins), where collard greens are staple of Southern soul food.

Sturdy, slightly bitter collard greens hold up beautifully to long, slow cooking but can also be used raw in salads, much like kale. In America, they are most widely revered in Southern soul food where they are traditionally stewed with a smoked ham hock or bacon and vinegar. There are loads of great recipes out there, and many also include onions, garlic, and chicken stock. Collard greens have a long history: they were a staple of the Native American diet, an essential
part of Southern American soul food, and are widely used in cultures around the world, including Ethiopia, India, Brazil, and Portugal (to name a few).

Not only do they have a rich history, they are highly nourishing and full of vitamins K, A, and C, as well as calcium, iron, and fiber.

In this twist on a classic, I’ve paired the greens with spicy, paprika-laden Spanish chorizo, sweet caramelized onions, and a splash of sherry vinegar. This flavorful combination would also work well with kale or chard, just adjust the cooking times as needed and according to taste.

Collard Greens with Chorizo and Caramelized Onions
Collard Greens with Chorizo and Caramelized Onions (Wendy Goodfriend)

Recipe: Collard Greens with Chorizo and Caramelized Onions

Makes about 6 servings

    Ingredients:

  • 1 lb collard greens (about 1 large bunch), tough stems removed
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/4 lb Spanish chorizo, halved or quartered lengthwise and sliced
  • 1 tbsp sherry vinegar, or to taste
Prep 1/4 lb Spanish chorizo, halved or quartered lengthwise and sliced.
Prep 1/4 lb Spanish chorizo, halved or quartered lengthwise and sliced. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Instructions:

  1. Strip the leaves away from the tough stems of the greens and discard the stems. Roughly chop the leaves, transfer to a colander, and rinse thoroughly with cold water. Drain but leave the water clinging to the leaves.
  2. Strip the leaves away from the tough stems of the greens and discard the stems.
    Strip the leaves away from the tough stems of the greens and discard the stems. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Slice the bunched greens.
    Slice the bunched greens. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Roughly chop the leaves.
    Roughly chop the leaves. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  3. In a large saute pan over medium heat, warm the oil. Add the onions and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, until they start to caramelize, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. Add the chorizo, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until lightly browned, about 3 minutes. Drain off all but 1 tbsp fat.
  4. In a large saute pan over medium heat, warm the oil. Add the onions and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, until they start to caramelize, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a bowl.
    In a large saute pan over medium heat, warm the oil. Add the onions and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, until they start to caramelize, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Add the chorizo, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until lightly browned, about 3 minutes.
    Add the chorizo, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until lightly browned, about 3 minutes. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  5. Add the caramelized onions and greens to the pan with the chorizo and stir well to combine. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the greens are wilted, about 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to low, and add the sherry vinegar. Cover and cook until the greens are tender, about 10 minutes longer. If the greens look dry, add a few tablespoons of water. Taste and add more salt or vinegar if needed. Serve at once.
  6. Add the caramelized onions and greens to the pan with the chorizo and stir well to combine.
    Add the caramelized onions and greens to the pan with the chorizo and stir well to combine. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the greens are wilted, about 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to low, and add the sherry vinegar.
    Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the greens are wilted, about 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to low, and add the sherry vinegar. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Cover and cook until the greens are tender, about 10 minutes longer. If the greens look dry, add a few tablespoons of water. Taste and add more salt or vinegar if needed.
    Cover and cook until the greens are tender, about 10 minutes longer. If the greens look dry, add a few tablespoons of water. Taste and add more salt or vinegar if needed. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Serve at once.
    Serve at once. (Wendy Goodfriend)
Thanksgiving Recipe: Collard Greens with Chorizo and Onions 23 October,2017Kim Laidlaw

Author

Kim Laidlaw

Kim Laidlaw is a cookbook author, editor, food writer, producer, project manager, and baker who has been in the kitchen covered in flour since she was big enough to stir the biscuit dough. She has over 16 years of experience in book and online publishing, and a lifetime of experience in the kitchen.

Her first cookbook, Home Baked Comfort, was published in 2011; her second cookbook, Baby & Toddler On the Go, was published in April 2013; and her third cookbook, Williams-Sonoma Dessert of the Day, was published in October 2013.

She was the first blogger on KQED’s Bay Area Bites blog, which launched in 2005, and previously worked as a professional baker at La Farine French Bakery in Oakland, CA. She lives in Petaluma with her husband and their child, whom she cooks for everyday. Find out more at http://www.kimlaidlaw.com.

Author

Wendy Goodfriend

I am the Senior Interactive Producer for KQED Food. I have designed and produced food-related websites and blogs for KQED including Bay Area Bites; Check, Please! Bay Area;  Taste This; Jacques Pepin’s websites; Weir Cooking in the City and KQED Food. When I am not creating and managing food websites I am taking photos and video of Bay Area Life and designing online navigation systems. My professional education and training includes: clinical psychology, photography, commercial cooking, web design, information architecture and UX. You can find me engaged in social media on Twitter @bayareabites and on Facebook at Bay Area Bites. I can also be found photoblogging at look2remember.

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