Healthy Black-Eyed Pea Salad

Healthy Black-Eyed Pea Salad (Wendy Goodfriend)

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I’m not really a fan of black-eyed peas. Being from the south, they are a fairly common legume and make their appearance in plenty of dishes, the most famous being Hoppin John’. But all I remember of these two-toned beans is a big mushy pile of flavorless blech. I clearly haven’t had good black-eyed peas in my life.

So I set out to change these recollections with an updated dish. Now, I like a good, vinegary bean salad. Lentils vinaigrette–hell yes. Homemade white bean salad with tuna–now you’re talking. And what I came up with was a healthier version of black-eyed peas with a few crunchy veggies, and an herbed vinaigrette with plenty of oomph. The great news is that you can make this a day or two in advance, and then just pull it out for your New Year’s Day feast. Or eat it anytime for lunch or as a side dish for dinner.

Black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed and drained again.
Black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed and drained again. (Wendy Goodfriend)

To keep things easy, and make this quickly, I used canned beans. But if you want to take the time to start with dried beans, you’ll need 1 cup dried black-eyed peas, soaked in cold water overnight. The next day, drain and rinse the soaked beans. Add to a large saucepan, then add enough water to cover the beans by 1 inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender but not mushy, about 45 minutes (the amount of time it takes to boil beans can vary greatly depending on the age and type of bean, so taste as you go). Drain the beans and run under cold water. Let drain, then transfer to a serving bowl. Let cool.

Healthy Black-Eyed Pea Salad
Healthy Black-Eyed Pea Salad (Wendy Goodfriend)

Recipe: Healthy Black-Eyed Pea Salad

Makes 6 servings

    Ingredients:

  • 2 (15.5-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed and drained again
  • 1 roasted red bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 1 large or 2 medium stalks celery, finely chopped
  • 1/2 small red onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    Sherry Vinaigrette

  • 3 tbsp sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
    Instructions:

  1. Put the drained and rinsed beans in a large serving bowl. Add the roasted bell pepper, celery, red onion, and parsley.
  2. Put the drained and rinsed beans in a large serving bowl. Add the roasted bell pepper, celery, red onion, and parsley.
    Put the drained and rinsed beans in a large serving bowl. Add the roasted bell pepper, celery, red onion, and parsley. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  3. To make the vinaigrette, in a jar, shake together all the vinaigrette ingredients plus a pinch each of salt and pepper. Alternatively, whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a bowl.
  4. To make the vinaigrette, in a jar, shake together all the vinaigrette ingredients plus a pinch each of salt and pepper.
    To make the vinaigrette, in a jar, shake together all the vinaigrette ingredients plus a pinch each of salt and pepper. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  5. Pour vinaigrette over the bean mixture. Stir to combine, cover, and refrigerate until chilled, about 1 hour. (The salad can be prepared up to 1 day in advance.)
  6. Pour vinaigrette over the bean mixture.
    Pour vinaigrette over the bean mixture. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Stir to combine, cover, and refrigerate until chilled, about 1 hour.
    Stir to combine, cover, and refrigerate until chilled, about 1 hour. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  7. Taste and season with salt and pepper, then serve.
  8. Taste and season with salt and pepper.
    Taste and season with salt and pepper. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Garnish the Healthy Black-Eyed Pea Salad with some fresh parsley and serve.
    Garnish the Healthy Black-Eyed Pea Salad with some fresh parsley and serve. (Wendy Goodfriend)
New Year’s Day: Healthy Black-Eyed Pea Salad with Sherry Vinaigrette 2 January,2017Kim Laidlaw

  • Hillary Clintub

    Dang, I wish I’d had this recipe yesterday before I made the trek into the big city to do my monthly grocery shopping. This sounds like it would make black eyed peas pretty palatable. As it is, I’ll just have to have my traditional BLPs out of the can. I’m not a real big fan of BLPs except on New Years Day. My mother and grandmother would be spinning in their graves if I didn’t have black eyed peas for New Years. That’s the only time out of the whole year I eat them.

Author

Kim Laidlaw

Kim Laidlaw is a cookbook author, editor, food writer, producer, project manager, and baker who has been in the kitchen covered in flour since she was big enough to stir the biscuit dough. She has over 16 years of experience in book and online publishing, and a lifetime of experience in the kitchen.

Her first cookbook, Home Baked Comfort, was published in 2011; her second cookbook, Baby & Toddler On the Go, was published in April 2013; and her third cookbook, Williams-Sonoma Dessert of the Day, was published in October 2013.

She was the first blogger on KQED’s Bay Area Bites blog, which launched in 2005, and previously worked as a professional baker at La Farine French Bakery in Oakland, CA. She lives in Petaluma with her husband and their child, whom she cooks for everyday. Find out more at http://www.kimlaidlaw.com.

Author

Wendy Goodfriend

I am the Senior Interactive Producer for KQED Food. I have designed and produced food-related websites and blogs for KQED including Bay Area Bites; Check, Please! Bay Area;  Taste This; Jacques Pepin’s websites; Weir Cooking in the City and KQED Food. When I am not creating and managing food websites I am taking photos and video of Bay Area Life and designing online navigation systems. My professional education and training includes: clinical psychology, photography, commercial cooking, web design, information architecture and UX. You can find me engaged in social media on Twitter @bayareabites and on Facebook at Bay Area Bites. I can also be found photoblogging at look2remember.