When I was in college in Texas, many years ago, my off-campus house was often the gathering place for friends. And when friends gathered, we made food – lots of it. As students we were on a strict budget, and many folks were vegetarian (for both political and budgetary reasons!) so we had to be creative. Of the many favorites during those days, which have carried through to my adulthood, one of the stand-outs was making a big pot of savory-sweet black beans.

Nothing irks me more when you order black beans at a restaurant and all you get is an unseasoned pile of starchy blandness. (Ok, well, plenty of things irk me, but come on….all it takes is a little salt and spices to jazz up beans.)

My friends and I came up with this recipe, which hasn’t morphed much in the (ahem) number of years since college, and I still love serving it at big gatherings. It would be a great addition to an alternative Mexican-inspired Thanksgiving spread alongside Mexican rice and chile-rubbed turkey with mole gravy. But it’s just as festive when served up over a bowl of white steamed rice with a pile of warm, fresh tortillas, the way we did it back in Texas so long ago (if you are really feeling fancy, top it with fresh tomato pico de gallo, shredded Jack cheese, and a dollop of sour cream.)

Be sure to soak your beans the night before as it helps plump them up, gives them better texture, and makes them cook a bit faster.

Pre-soaked black beans ready to cook.
Pre-soaked black beans ready to cook. (Wendy Goodfriend)

Recipe: Savory Black Beans

Makes 10–12 servings

    Ingredients:

  • 1 lb dried black beans (about 2 cups), soaked overnight in cold water to cover by a few inches
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 1 small red bell pepper, trimmed, seeded, and finely chopped
  • 1 small yellow or orange bell pepper, trimmed, seeded, and finely chopped
  • 1 small green bell pepper, trimmed, seeded, and finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon dried Mexican oregano
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup dry red wine
  • 2 tablespoons sugar (optional)
  • Hot pepper sauce, to taste (optional)
Prepped vegetables for the savory black beans.
Prepped vegetables for the savory black beans. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Instructions:

  1. Drain and rinse the beans. Add the beans, garlic cloves, and bay leaves to a large, heavy saucepan or pot and add cool water to cover by about 1 inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then cover partially, reduce the heat to low, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 1 hour (this is highly dependent upon the age of the beans so it could take less time or more time, so keep an eye on them!). If the beans start to dry out, add a little boiling water to keep them moist and slightly soupy. (If, at the end of cooking, there is too much liquid in the pot, skim some of it out.)
  2. Add the beans, garlic cloves, and bay leaves to a large, heavy saucepan or pot and add cool water to cover by about 1 inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then cover partially, reduce the heat to low, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until tender.
    Add the beans, garlic cloves, and bay leaves to a large, heavy saucepan or pot and add cool water to cover by about 1 inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then cover partially, reduce the heat to low, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until tender. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  3. Meanwhile, in a frying pan, warm the olive oil. Add the onion, bell peppers, oregano, and 1 teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are really tender, about 8 minutes. When the beans are tender, add the vegetables to the beans. Stir in the wine and sugar. Let simmer for 15 minutes longer, then taste and adjust the seasonings with salt, pepper, sugar, and hot sauce. Serve.
  4. In a frying pan, warm the olive oil. Add the onion, bell peppers, oregano, and 1 teaspoon salt.
    In a frying pan, warm the olive oil. Add the onion, bell peppers, oregano, and 1 teaspoon salt. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are really tender, about 8 minutes.
    Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are really tender, about 8 minutes. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    When the beans are tender, add the vegetables to the beans.
    When the beans are tender, add the vegetables to the beans. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Stir in the wine and sugar.
    Stir in the wine and sugar. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Let simmer for 15 minutes longer, then taste and adjust the seasonings with salt, pepper, sugar, and hot sauce.
    Let simmer for 15 minutes longer, then taste and adjust the seasonings with salt, pepper, sugar, and hot sauce. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Serve the Savory Black Beans
    Serve the Savory Black Beans (Wendy Goodfriend)
Mexican-Style Thanksgiving: Savory Black Beans 18 November,2016Kim Laidlaw

Author

Kim Laidlaw

Kim Laidlaw is a cookbook author, editor, food writer, producer, project manager, and baker who has been in the kitchen covered in flour since she was big enough to stir the biscuit dough. She has over 16 years of experience in book and online publishing, and a lifetime of experience in the kitchen.

Her first cookbook, Home Baked Comfort, was published in 2011; her second cookbook, Baby & Toddler On the Go, was published in April 2013; and her third cookbook, Williams-Sonoma Dessert of the Day, was published in October 2013.

She was the first blogger on KQED’s Bay Area Bites blog, which launched in 2005, and previously worked as a professional baker at La Farine French Bakery in Oakland, CA. She lives in Petaluma with her husband and their child, whom she cooks for everyday. Find out more at http://www.kimlaidlaw.com.

Author

Wendy Goodfriend

I am the Senior Interactive Producer for KQED Food. I have designed and produced food-related websites and blogs for KQED including Bay Area Bites; Check, Please! Bay Area;  Taste This; Jacques Pepin’s websites; Weir Cooking in the City and KQED Food. When I am not creating and managing food websites I am taking photos and video of Bay Area Life and designing online navigation systems. My professional education and training includes: clinical psychology, photography, commercial cooking, web design, information architecture and UX. You can find me engaged in social media on Twitter @bayareabites and on Facebook at Bay Area Bites. I can also be found photoblogging at look2remember.

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