Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns (Wendy Goodfriend)

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I first became enamored with these Easter beauties when I was a baker at La Farine in Oakland, CA. Every springtime, we would dutifully mix the spiced dough with plenty of raisins and candied orange peel, then divide the fragrant dough, roll them into balls and bake them once they were perfectly puffy. Once cooled, we would pipe sweet icing in the shape of a cross over the top. Traditionally the crosses are made with a flour paste piped on before baking. But I’m just not crazy about that and frankly, I like the sticky sweet icing. Plus that’s how we always made them at La Farine.

These are not difficult to make, but they are a yeasted dough, so you’ll need to plan on them taking a few hours to rise. Remember that rising times are affected by the temperature of the room, so on a hot day, these might rise more quickly than on a cold day.

Using a stand mixer makes quick work of this dough, but you can also make it by hand in a regular bowl with a wooden spoon to mix. Once the dough comes together, just dump it on a work surface and knead it for about 10 minutes. It’s a great upper-body workout too!

Regardless of how you make them, they will fill your house with the sweet fragrance of spices and orange zest. If you like, use raisins instead of dried currants. Or add 1/2 cup chopped candied orange peel (in addition to or instead of the orange zest).

Traditionally the crosses are made with a flour paste piped on before baking. But I’m just not crazy about that and frankly, I like the sticky sweet icing.
Traditionally the crosses are made with a flour paste piped on before baking. But I’m just not crazy about that and frankly, I like the sticky sweet icing. (Wendy Goodfriend)

Recipe: Hot Cross Buns

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Makes 16 buns

    Ingredients:

  • 1 package (2 1/4 tsp) active dry yeast
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • ¾ cup whole milk, warmed to 110°F
  • 3 large eggs
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tbsp finely grated orange zest
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp ground allspice
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 6 tbsp unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into pieces
  • 1 cup dried currants
    For topping

  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp orange juice, plus more as needed
    Instructions:

  1. To make the dough, in the bowl of a stand mixer, dissolve the yeast and granulated sugar in the warm milk and let stand until foamy, about 10 minutes. Add the eggs, flour, orange zest, spices, and salt. Attach the dough hook and knead on low speed until the ingredients come together. Toss in the butter and continue to knead until the dough is smooth and springy, about 8 minutes. Add the currants and mix on low speed until they are mixed into the dough. Lightly oil a large bowl. Form the dough into a ball, put it in the oiled bowl, and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise at room temperature until it doubles, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
  2. Dissolve the yeast and granulated sugar in the warm milk and let stand until foamy, about 10 minutes. Add the eggs, flour, orange zest, spices, and salt.
    Dissolve the yeast and granulated sugar in the warm milk and let stand until foamy, about 10 minutes. Add the eggs, flour, orange zest, spices, and salt. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Toss in the butter and continue to knead until the dough is smooth and springy, about 8 minutes. Add the currants and mix on low speed until they are mixed into the dough.
    Toss in the butter and continue to knead until the dough is smooth and springy, about 8 minutes. Add the currants and mix on low speed until they are mixed into the dough. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Form the dough into a ball, put it in the oiled bowl, and cover the bowl with plastic wrap.
    Form the dough into a ball, then put it in the oiled bowl, and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Let the dough rise at room temperature until it doubles, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
    Let the dough rise at room temperature until it doubles, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  3. Dump the dough onto a clean work surface. Divide the dough into 16 equal pieces and roll each into a ball. Space the buns out on a baking sheet lined with parchment, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.
  4. Divide the dough into 16 equal pieces.
    Divide the dough into 16 equal pieces. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Roll each piece into a ball. Space the buns out on a baking sheet lined with parchment, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.
    Roll each piece into a ball. Space the buns out on a baking sheet lined with parchment, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  5. Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350°F. Remove the plastic wrap and brush the buns with the egg wash. Bake until golden brown, about 18 minutes. Let cool completely in the pan, set on a wire rack.
  6. Remove the plastic wrap and brush the buns with the egg wash.
    Remove the plastic wrap and brush the buns with the egg wash. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Bake until golden brown, about 18 minutes. Let cool completely in the pan, set on a wire rack.
    Bake until golden brown, about 18 minutes. Let cool completely in the pan, set on a wire rack. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  7. To make the icing, in a bowl, beat together the powdered sugar, vanilla, and orange juice. You should have a smooth but very thick icing, but if it’s overly thick (meaning you can’t stir it easily) just add a little more orange juice. Spoon the icing into a quart-sized Ziploc bag and snip a corner off. Use the bag as a piping bag to pipe the icing over the tops of the cooled buns in the shape of a cross.
  8. To make the icing, in a bowl, beat together the powdered sugar, vanilla, and orange juice. You should have a smooth but very thick icing.
    To make the icing, in a bowl, beat together the powdered sugar, vanilla, and orange juice. You should have a smooth but very thick icing. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Spoon the icing into a quart-sized Ziploc bag and snip a corner off. Use the bag as a piping bag to pipe the icing over the tops of the cooled buns in the shape of a cross.
    Spoon the icing into a quart-sized Ziploc bag and snip a corner off. Use the bag as a piping bag to pipe the icing over the tops of the cooled buns in the shape of a cross. (Wendy Goodfriend)
Easter Brunch: Hot Cross Buns 25 March,2016Kim Laidlaw

Author

Kim Laidlaw

Kim Laidlaw is a cookbook author, editor, food writer, producer, project manager, and baker who has been in the kitchen covered in flour since she was big enough to stir the biscuit dough. She has over 16 years of experience in book and online publishing, and a lifetime of experience in the kitchen.

Her first cookbook, Home Baked Comfort, was published in 2011; her second cookbook, Baby & Toddler On the Go, was published in April 2013; and her third cookbook, Williams-Sonoma Dessert of the Day, was published in October 2013.

She was the first blogger on KQED’s Bay Area Bites blog, which launched in 2005, and previously worked as a professional baker at La Farine French Bakery in Oakland, CA. She lives in Petaluma with her husband and their child, whom she cooks for everyday. Find out more at http://www.kimlaidlaw.com.

Author

Wendy Goodfriend

I am the Senior Interactive Producer for KQED Food. I have designed and produced food-related websites and blogs for KQED including Bay Area Bites; Check, Please! Bay Area;  Taste This; Jacques Pepin’s websites; Weir Cooking in the City and KQED Food. When I am not creating and managing food websites I am taking photos and video of Bay Area Life and designing online navigation systems. My professional education and training includes: clinical psychology, photography, commercial cooking, web design, information architecture and UX. You can find me engaged in social media on Twitter @bayareabites and on Facebook at Bay Area Bites. I can also be found photoblogging at look2remember.