Dry-Brined Herbed Roast Turkey

Dry-Brined Herbed Roast Turkey (Wendy Goodfriend)

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Deep-fried, smoked, grilled, spatchcocked, stuffed, dismantled, braised, submerged in a vat of brine…over the many years I’ve been making Thanksgiving dinner, I’ve prepared turkey every which way, some more successful than others. But this year I’m going old-school with a big beautiful bird roasted in my oven.

I’ve learned some key tips through my experiments: brined turkeys taste better, butter helps keep things moist, and don’t stuff your turkey or you risk food poisoning (plus I find it a bit gross.) So, with the stuffing on the side, this year I decided to treat my turkey the way I like to treat my roast chicken.

The first step is to dry brine it. What does that mean? Rub the turkey all over (inside and out, under and over the skin) with plenty of kosher salt and then let it sit and let the salt work its magic over one or two days. It works the way a wet brine does, which is to impart salty flavor into the meat.

Rub the turkey all over, inside and out, under the skin and over the skin, with plenty of kosher salt and then let it sit and let the salt work its magic.
Rub the turkey all over, inside and out, under the skin and over the skin, with plenty of kosher salt and then let it sit and let the salt work its magic. (Wendy Goodfriend)

Next step: take the chill off the turkey and dry it all over with paper towels. I don’t bother rinsing it (and there’s too much risk of cross-contamination with a giant dripping bird.) Drying it helps keep it from sticking, and helps the butter stick to it.

Take the chill off the turkey and dry it all over with paper towels.
Take the chill off the turkey and dry it all over with paper towels. (Wendy Goodfriend)

Then rub that bird all over with a herb-infused butter as you did with the salt: inside and out and under and over the skin. Stuff it with a few aromatics (but not so many that there is no air circulation inside the bird), pop it on a rack in a roasting pan, and roast, roast, roast away.

Rub that bird all over with a herb-infused butter, inside and out and under and over the skin.
Rub that bird all over with a herb-infused butter, inside and out and under and over the skin. (Wendy Goodfriend)

I like to keep some liquid in the bottom of the roasting pan to help keep things moist — plus it makes for a great gravy base when you’re ready to make it. I also like to turn the bird while cooking to make sure it’s all nice and crisp and browned.

I like to keep some liquid in the bottom of the roasting pan to help keep things moist.
I like to keep some liquid in the bottom of the roasting pan to help keep things moist. (Wendy Goodfriend)

Keep an eye on the temperature with an instant-read thermometer to make sure you don’t over or under cook this beauty.

Happy Turkey Day!

Dry-Brined Herbed Roast Turkey

Makes 12+ servings

    Ingredients:

  • One 14-lb turkey, ideally organic and pasture-raised, defrosted if frozen
  • About 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 6 tbsp unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh sage leaves
  • 1 small yellow onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 carrot, roughly chopped
  • 1 cup turkey stock, chicken broth, or white wine
    Instructions:

  1. One to two days before roasting:
    Rub the salt all over the turkey, under and over the skin and in the cavities. Place it in a roasting pan or a baking pan, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to cook.
  2. The day you plan to serve the turkey:
    Remove the turkey from the refrigerator about 1 hour before roasting.
  3. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400F. In a bowl, stir together the butter, thyme, and sage until well combined.
  4. In a bowl, stir together the butter, thyme, and sage until well combined.
    In a bowl, stir together the butter, thyme, and sage until well combined. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  5. Using paper towels, dry the turkey inside and out. Rub the butter mixture under and over the top of the skin. Stuff the cavity with the onion, carrot and parsley sprigs.
  6. Rub the butter mixture under the skin and over the top of the skin.
    Rub the butter mixture under the skin and over the top of the skin. (Wendy Goodfriend)
    Stuff the cavity with the onion, carrot and parsley sprigs.
    Stuff the cavity with the onion, carrot and parsley sprigs. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  7. Set the turkey on a roasting rack set inside of a roasting pan just big enough to hold the turkey. Add the stock or wine to the pan.
  8. Roast the turkey for 1 hour, then reduce the heat to 375F.
    Roast the turkey for 1 hour, then reduce the heat to 375F. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  9. Roast the turkey for 1 hour, then reduce the heat to 375F. Turn the bird upside down to brown the bottom. Continue to roast, basting the turkey occasionally with the pan juices, for 1 more hour. Remove the turkey from the oven and carefully turn the bird breast side up. Continue to roast until the temperature reads 165F in the thickest part of the breast away from the bone or 170F in the thickest part of the thigh away from the bone. The turkey juices should run clear.
  10. Turn the bird upside down to brown the bottom. Continue to roast, basting the turkey occasionally with the pan juices, for 1 more hour.
    Turn the bird upside down to brown the bottom. Continue to roast, basting the turkey occasionally with the pan juices, for 1 more hour. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  11. Remove the turkey from the oven, transfer to a carving board, loosely tent with foil, and let rest for 15 minutes while you prepare the gravy from the pan juices.
  12. Remove the turkey from the oven and carefully turn the bird breast side up. Continue to roast until the temperature reads 165F in the thickest part of the breast away from the bone or 170F in the thickest part of the thigh away from the bone.
    Remove the turkey from the oven and carefully turn the bird breast side up. Continue to roast until the temperature reads 165F in the thickest part of the breast away from the bone or 170F in the thickest part of the thigh away from the bone. (Wendy Goodfriend)
  13. Be sure to reserve the turkey carcass and roasted vegetables for making stock.
  14. The finished Dry-Brined Herbed Roast Turkey
    The finished Dry-Brined Herbed Roast Turkey (Wendy Goodfriend)
Homemade Thanksgiving: Classic Dry-Brined and Butter-Basted Roast Turkey with Herbs 15 December,2015Kim Laidlaw

Author

Kim Laidlaw

Kim Laidlaw is a cookbook author, editor, food writer, producer, project manager, and baker who has been in the kitchen covered in flour since she was big enough to stir the biscuit dough. She has over 16 years of experience in book and online publishing, and a lifetime of experience in the kitchen.

Her first cookbook, Home Baked Comfort, was published in 2011; her second cookbook, Baby & Toddler On the Go, was published in April 2013; and her third cookbook, Williams-Sonoma Dessert of the Day, was published in October 2013.

She was the first blogger on KQED’s Bay Area Bites blog, which launched in 2005, and previously worked as a professional baker at La Farine French Bakery in Oakland, CA. She lives in Petaluma with her husband and their child, whom she cooks for everyday. Find out more at http://www.kimlaidlaw.com.

Author

Wendy Goodfriend

I am the Senior Interactive Producer for KQED Food. I have designed and produced food-related websites and blogs for KQED including Bay Area Bites; Check, Please! Bay Area;  Taste This; Jacques Pepin’s websites; Weir Cooking in the City and KQED Food. When I am not creating and managing food websites I am taking photos and video of Bay Area Life and designing online navigation systems. My professional education and training includes: clinical psychology, photography, commercial cooking, web design, information architecture and UX. You can find me engaged in social media on Twitter @bayareabites and on Facebook at Bay Area Bites. I can also be found photoblogging at look2remember.