Dance and Theater Join in a Healing Ritual

A scene from a recent episode of 'House/full of BlackWomen'

A scene from a recent episode of 'House/full of BlackWomen' (Photo: Robbie Sweeney)

Theater director Ellen Sebastian Chang and dance maker Amara Tabor Smith (Deep Water Dance Theater) have mixed theater, dance, ritual healing and a bit of social work in a series of shows called House/Full of BlackWomen, addressing issues of displacement, oppression, and sex trafficking in Oakland.

A scene from a recent episode of 'House/Full of BlackWomen'
A scene from a recent episode of ‘House/Full of BlackWomen.’ (Photo: Robbie Sweeney)

This newest episode, passing/through/the great/middle, invokes the Yoruba Orishas (a pantheon of gods from Africa who came to the new world with African slaves) as it tells a story about displacement and migration from Oakland. Ellen Sebastian Chang tells us that the show will take the audience on a journey too, from International Boulevard into the theater and back onto the street. “The audience is moving so they get this feeling also of being constantly in a state of migration of motion,” Chang said, “the difference between moving by choice and moving by force.”

passing/through/the great/middle runs Feb 2 and 3 at the Eastside Cultural Center in Oakland. Details here.

Dance and Theater Join in a Healing Ritual 24 January,2018Cy Musiker

Author

Cy Musiker

Cy Musiker co-hosts The Do List and covers the arts for KQED News and The California Report.  He loves live performance, especially great theater, jazz, roots music, anything by Mahler. Cy has an MJ from UC Berkeley’s School of Journalism, and got his BA from Hampshire College. His work has been recognized by the Society for Professional Journalists with their Sigma Delta Chi Award for Public Service in Journalism. When he can, Cy likes to swim in Tomales Bay, run with his dog in the East Bay Hills, and hike the Sierra.

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