A Chicanx Opera for the Day of the Dead

Dancers Mayra Enriquez and Norberto Martinez are featured in 'Una Opera Muerta' at the Brava Theater Center

Dancers Mayra Enriquez and Norberto Martinez are featured in 'Una Opera Muerta' at the Brava Theater Center (Photo: Gordon Huang)

John Jota Leaños is raising an army of skeletons against colonialism— at least metaphorically. He’s an animator and filmmaker who’s also directing Imperial Silence: Una Opera Muerta, a Day of the Dead opera that features animated sugar-skull news anchors on DNN, the Dead News Network, dancers and singers performing story songs like “El Corrido de Pat Tillman.”

“We’re in these borderlands,” Leaños says, “in this de-colonial mixed scene, where we get all of these influences and try to make sense of it.” As my co-host A-lan Holt says, Leaños’ work is an “intervention into the long (and often violent) history of tactics used to silence non-white viewpoints in the United States of America.” And there are laughs too. Details here.

 

A Chicanx Opera for the Day of the Dead 1 November,2017Cy Musiker

Author

Cy Musiker

Cy Musiker co-hosts The Do List and covers the arts for KQED News and The California Report.  He loves live performance, especially great theater, jazz, roots music, anything by Mahler. Cy has an MJ from UC Berkeley’s School of Journalism, and got his BA from Hampshire College. His work has been recognized by the Society for Professional Journalists with their Sigma Delta Chi Award for Public Service in Journalism. When he can, Cy likes to swim in Tomales Bay, run with his dog in the East Bay Hills, and hike the Sierra.

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