Sasha Khokha

Sasha Khokha is the host of The California Report  weekly magazine program, which takes listeners on sound-rich radio excursions around the Golden State. As The California Report's Central Valley Bureau Chief for nearly a dozen years, Sasha brought the lives and concerns of rural Californians to listeners around the state. Sasha's reporting helped exposed the hidden price immigrant women janitors and farmworkers may pay to keep their jobs: sexual assault at work -- and helped change California law with regard to sexual harassment of farmworkers.  She's won a national PRNDI award for investigative reporting, as well as multiple prizes from the Radio Television News Directors Association and the Society for Professional Journalists. She began her radio career in waterproof overalls, filing stories about the salmon fishery at Raven Radio in Sitka, AK. She has produced and reported for several documentary films. Calcutta Calling, about children adopted from India to Swedish-Lutheran Minnesota, was nominated for an Emmy Award. Sasha is  a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and Brown University, and is the mother of two young children.
(J. Stephen Conn/Flickr)

Farmworker Women Gather in Tulare County

Nearly a thousand farmworker women will gather Friday in Tulare, one of California’s poorest counties, for the annual Farmworker Women's Conference. They'll learn about education, social services and have an opportunity to discuss their lives and the health challenges they face. Lali Moheno of Visalia started this San Joaquin Valley conference 11 years ago because she wanted to help other women farmworkers. Moheno’s mother spent decades picking cotton and grapes. She died without any medical insurance to treat her leg injuries and diabetes. Moheno sought to help educate other women and share tactics to improve their lives.

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‘Cal Enviroscreen’ Ranks Zip Codes Statewide By Pollution

California’s Environmental Protection Agency is rolling out a new tool to help pinpoint communities that may be particularly vulnerable to pollution. It’s the first environmental index of its kind in the nation, measuring a broad range of pollutants and health indicators in every zip code across the state. The highest scoring community is West Fresno, one of the city’s poorest areas. City leaders recently opened a new sports complex there, billing it a “baseball, softball, and soccer dreamland.” It also features a skateboard park, paintball, and a fishing pond.