People seem to love reading studies about the beneficial effects of moderate alcohol consumption. In a review published this month, In a review published in Addiction this month features a critical look at these associations and concluded, “The evidence for the harmful effects of alcohol is undoubtedly stronger than the evidence for beneficial effects.” The confounding issue: people who drink moderately may simply have healthier lifestyles in general.

That was the response of several doctors and alcohol researchers to an editorial based on a critical analysis of recent studies in the journal Addiction. “People have several motives for drinking alcohol, but most evidence today indicates that health is not a valid argument,” author Hans Olav Fekjaer, a psychiatrist in Oslo, Norway, told Reuters Health by email.

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Lisa Aliferis

Lisa Aliferis is the founding editor of KQED's State of Health blog. Since 2011, she's been writing stories and editing them for the site. Before taking up blogging, she toiled for many years producing health stories for television, including Dateline NBC and San Francisco's CBS affiliate, KPIX-TV. She also wrote up a handy guide to the Affordable Care Act, especially for Californians. You can follow her on Twitter: @laliferis

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