The controversy around contraception coverage started last August when the Administration said that insurers were required to cover contraception with no co-pay. Many religious nonprofits fought the rule, arguing it violated their religious beliefs.


Women who work for religious-affiliated organizations can have contraceptive services under their health insurance through separate coverage while allowing their employers not to violate their religious beliefs by exempting them from paying for it, according to a proposed regulation issued Friday by the Department of Health and Human Services.

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Author

Lisa Aliferis

Lisa Aliferis is the founding editor of KQED's State of Health blog. Since 2011, she's been writing and editing stories for the site. Before taking up blogging, she toiled for many years (more than we can count) producing health stories for television, including Dateline NBC and San Francisco's CBS affiliate, KPIX-TV. She also wrote up a handy guide to the Affordable Care Act, especially for Californians. Her work has been honored for many awards. Most recently she was a finalist for "Best Topical Reporting" from the Online News Association. You can follow her on Twitter: @laliferis

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