KQED Science

KQED Science brings you award-winning science and environment coverage from the Bay Area and beyond by the flagship Northern California PBS and NPR affiliate.

Computer Program Maps Cancer Progression

What if doctors could call up a computerized map that would show them how a case of cancer is likely to progress? Tumor cells can mutate in unexpected ways. And cancers can suddenly grow. For doctors, anticipating cancer’s next moves can help guide timely, effective patient treatment. The program maps cancer progression Read More … … Continue reading Computer Program Maps Cancer Progression →

Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: How to Judge Research Study Results

A recent study making headlines around the world found that some early-stage breast cancer patients could avoid chemotherapy with only a slightly higher risk of the cancer recurring and spreading than those who underwent the treatment. There is often potential variation in study numbers that make the headlines. The study Read More … Source:: Future … Continue reading Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: How to Judge Research Study Results →

Coastal Commission Roundly Rejects Banning Ranch Development

NEWPORT BEACH — A California panel has overwhelmingly rejected a plan to build nearly 900 upscale homes and a hotel on a valuable stretch of Southern California coastline that has long been the site of oil drilling and now provides habitat for endangered and threatened wildlife. After a 13-hour meeting with Read More … Source:: … Continue reading Coastal Commission Roundly Rejects Banning Ranch Development →

Supervisor Pressures County to Get More Data on Chevron Refinery Flaring

For the third time in the last six months, local air regulators and Contra Costa County health officials are looking into a problem at Chevron’s Richmond refinery. Large flames and black smoke shot out of the facility for three hours on Saturday morning after one of the refinery’s hydrocracking units, which Read More … Source:: … Continue reading Supervisor Pressures County to Get More Data on Chevron Refinery Flaring →

Asteroid Named for Freddie Mercury is Announced on His Birthday

“It’s just a dot of light, but it’s a very special dot of light.” That’s how Queen guitarist Brian May describes the asteroid named for his late friend and bandmate Freddie Mercury. Official designation: Asteroid 17473 Freddiemercury. “Happy Birthday Freddie!” May wrote on Twitter. “They already named a planet after you, but Read More … … Continue reading Asteroid Named for Freddie Mercury is Announced on His Birthday →

Video Shows Vandals Destroying Popular Oregon Rock Formation

When the iconic sandstone formation known as “the duckbill” collapsed, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department wasn’t suspicious. Erosion happens. Rocks fall. The stretch of cliff where the formation was located, in Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area, was so unstable it was fenced off to keep visitors away. There seemed to Read More … Source:: … Continue reading Video Shows Vandals Destroying Popular Oregon Rock Formation →

A Flying Fish That Transformed the Sierra — for Better and for Worse

There’s no road in California quite like Highway 395. For more than 200 miles, the Sierra Nevada rises up alongside the route, a towering granite wall bordering starkly beautiful desert valleys. If you are driving 395, chances are you’ve come to fish for trout in one of the area’s alpine lakes. Read More … Source:: … Continue reading A Flying Fish That Transformed the Sierra — for Better and for Worse →

Bears Get Early Start on Labor Day in Pasadena Pool

PASADENA — Three black bears treated a suburban California neighborhood like a resort, taking a dip in a backyard pool and helping themselves to a dumpster buffet. The trio — two cubs and their mother — wandered out of the San Gabriel mountains and into the foothill city of Pasadena on Read More … Source:: … Continue reading Bears Get Early Start on Labor Day in Pasadena Pool →

Wait, an Edible Battery? Not So Hard to Swallow

“I’m not comfortable eating a watch battery.” That’s how researcher Christopher Bettinger describes one of the biggest obstacles for sending tiny medical robots into the human body for diagnosing and treating diseases. These devices run on batteries (like those in watches) and they are usually made of toxic materials such as Read More … Source:: … Continue reading Wait, an Edible Battery? Not So Hard to Swallow →