By Sasha Khokha

Levee manager Reggie Hill calls this riverbed the Grand Canyon of Madera County. Its rapid erosion is caused by the land sinking downstream. (Sasha Khokha/KQED)

This past weekend’s rain was too little, too late, to save Northern California from tight water supplies this summer. Another dry year for the state means farmers will be scrambling for water, and once again pumping from undergound water supplies. But too much pumping has overdrawn some aquifers, causing the land to sink in parts of California’s farm belt. And some farmers are turning to a unique solution.

The Sinking Valley

Levee manager Reggie Hill calls this riverbed the Grand Canyon of Madera County. Its rapid erosion is caused by the land sinking downstream. (Sasha Khokha/KQED)

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Source: Quest

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